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Emory University
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1836, Emory University is a national center for teaching, research, and service, awarding more than 4,921 undergraduate and graduate degrees annually. It is recognized by U.S. News & World Report as one of the top 25 universities in the US (ranked 21st in the 2019 report). In 1966 the University’s Board of Trustees integrated all of Emory’s health components into the Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center. The Woodruff Health Sciences Center joins those components of Emory University concerned with patient care, education of health professionals, research affecting health and illness, and policies for prevention and treatment of disease. Its components include schools of medicine, nursing, and public health; Yerkes National Primate Research Center; Winship Cancer Institute; Emory Global Health Institute, and Emory Healthcare, the most comprehensive health system in Georgia.

See http://www.emory.edu/home/about/factsfigures/index.html

 

Funded Research at Emory

Researchers at Emory University received $734 million from external funding agencies in fiscal year 2018, marking a 17 percent increase over the previous year, with such funding having increased more than 50 percent over the past 10 years. Federal agencies awarded $440.8 million, or more than 60 percent of the total, led by the National Institutes of Health, with $359.2 million in awards. NIH funding represented nearly 82 percent of total federal dollars awarded to Emory.

See second article in http://whsc.emory.edu/publications/hs-update-archive/11-2018.html

And https://news.emory.edu/features/2018/11/record-research-funding/index.html

Founded in 1836, Emory University is a national center for teaching, research, and service, awarding more than 4,921 undergraduate and graduate degree...

Emory College of Arts and Sciences
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Emory College of Arts and Sciences, founded in 1836, is Emory University’s primary undergraduate division with more than 5,600 students. Its intensive liberal arts curriculum is backed by all of the resources of one of the world's top research universities.

Emory College plays a critical role in supporting and expanding the liberal arts throughout the University and its nine undergraduate and professional schools. Emory College is driven by passions for inquiry and discovery, which are led by the College’s renowned 550-member faculty who bring their path-breaking research – and commitment to excellent teaching – to the classroom everyday.

With more than 50 departments and programs, 86 majors, and 63 minors, Emory College students explore widely and dive deeply in rigorous courses of study that emphasize critical thinking, the nature of evidence from multiple perspectives and the ability to effectively reason and communicate. Emory College students are encouraged – and expected – to ask bold questions and expand the boundaries of knowledge.

Emory College of Arts and Sciences, founded in 1836, is Emory University’s primary undergraduate division with more th...

The Robert W. Woodruff Health Sciences Center
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1966, the Woodruff Health Sciences Center is named for the legendary leader of the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff. It includes three schools, a national primate research center, a cancer institute, a global health institute, and the most comprehensive health care system in Georgia. The center is a component of Emory University, and many of its facilities are located on Emory’s main campus, five miles east of downtown Atlanta. The center also has clinical facilities throughout metro Atlanta and the state. 

 

Woodruff Health Sciences Center Components 

• Emory University School of Medicine

• Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing 

• Rollins School of Public Health

• Yerkes National Primate Research Center 

• Winship Cancer Institute

• Emory Global Health Institute

• Emory Healthcare (EHC) 

• Emory University Hospital

• Emory University Hospital Midtown

• Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital

• Emory Rehabilitation Hospital

• Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods

• Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital

• Emory Johns Creek Hospital

• Emory Decatur Hospital

• Emory Hillandale Hospital

• Emory Long-Term Acute Care

• Emory University Hospital Smyrna

• Emory Clinic (physician practice of Emory faculty physicians)

• Emory Specialty Associates (Emory-owned outreach physician practice 

organization with locations throughout the city and state)

• Emory Wesley Woods Campus (includes psychiatric hospital as well as a 

skilled nursing care facility and an affiliated residential retirement facility) 

• Emory Healthcare Network (clinically integrated network of Emory faculty and private practice physicians and hospitals formed to improve care coordination and quality outcomes) 

 

The Woodruff Health Sciences Center is part of Emory University, which also includes Emory College of Arts and Sciences, Oxford College, Laney Graduate School, Goizueta Business School, Emory School of Law, and Candler School of Theology. Including health sciences, Emory has a total of 15,451 students, 4,971 faculty, 37,716 employees, and $7.31 billion in endowment.

 

http://whsc.emory.edu/publications/pdfs/glance-2019.pdf

 

Comprehensive Figures in Woodruff Health Sciences Center (WHSC) 

Faculty.................................................................................................................... 3,459 

Adjunct faculty.......................................................................................................1,397

Students and trainees............................................................................................5,675

• Medical ................................................................................................................556

• Medical residents and fellows .......................................................................1,311 

• Nursing ...............................................................................................................899

• Public health .................................................................................................. 1,344 

• Postdocs .............................................................................................................495

• Allied Health ..................................................................................................... 530 

• Graduate Division of Biological & Biomedical Sciences..............................402 

• MD/PhD ...............................................................................................................93

• Master’s in Clinical Research .............................................................................45

Employees (includes 3,459 faculty) ..................................................................31,557 

Hospital beds .........................................................................................................2,691

Annual Emory Healthcare hospital admissions ............................................. 75,492 

Annual Emory Healthcare outpatient service visits ...............................4.7 million 

Annual Emory Healthcare nursing home admissions ........................................947 

Number of unique patients treated annually in Emory Healthcare ......... 617,094 

Annual inpatient and outpatient service visits (Emory Healthcare & affiliate hospitals).................................................7.7 million 

Research funding (fiscal year 2018) .................................................. $685.8 million 

Annual operating expenditures (fiscal year 2018).................................$4.5 billion 

Annual budget (fiscal year 2019) ............................................................. $5.4 billion 

Annual economic impact on metro Atlanta ........................................... $8.8 billion 

Emory Healthcare charity care (fiscal year 2018)..................................$98 million 

WHSC annual community benefit .................................................... $558.8 million Endowment...............................................................................................$2.91 billion 

Total buildings ....................................................................................................... >100 

Total net square feet....................................................................................5.2 million 

 

Rankings 

For more rankings, see http://whsc.emory.edu/about/facts-and-figures/rankings.html 

 

US News & World Report (July 30, 2019)

Emory University Hospital: 1 metro Atlanta, 1 Georgia 

Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital: 2 metro Atlanta, 2 Georgia

Emory University Hospital Midtown: 4 metro Atlanta, 5 Georgia

Emory University School of Medicine: 24 for research, 35 for primary care

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing: 4

Rollins School of Public Health: 5 

 

National Institutes of Health research funding 

Emory University School of Medicine: 18 

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing: 3 

Rollins School of Public Health: 6

 

Founded in 1966, the Woodruff Health Sciences Center is named for the legendary leader of the Coca-Cola Company, Robert W. Woodruff. It includes three schools, a national primate research center, a cancer in...

Emory University School of Medicine
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Founded in 1854, Emory University School of Medicine is ranked among the nation’s finest institutions for education, biomedical research, and patient care. Emory University School of Medicine has 3,166 full- and part-time faculty and 816 volunteer faculty. 

The school had more than 10,376 applications in 2019 for 138 first-year medical student positions. This class is composed of 53% women and 25% under-represented minorities, and 76% of the class members are nontraditional (they were out of college for at least a year before entering medical school). In 2019, the pass rate for first-time takers of step 1 of the National Board Exam (testing basic science knowledge and skills) was 96%. The school has 582 medical students and trains 1,322 residents and fellows in 107 accredited programs. The school has 92 MD/PhD students in one of 48 NIH-sponsored Medical Scientist Training Programs. Some of these students are in a joint program with Georgia Tech, with which the medical school shares a biomedical engineering department ranked third in the country by U.S. News & World Report. The medical school also offers a joint MD/MSCR (master’s in clinical research) degree, an MD/MPH degree with public health, and an MD/ MA in bioethics with Laney Graduate School. Dual programs with law (juris master) and business (MBA) also are available. Some 133 medical faculty also train predoctoral bioscience researchers in eight programs in the Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences in the graduate school. Faculty in five allied health programs train 522 students. These include physician assistant (PA) and physical therapy (PT) programs, each ranked fifth in the nation by U.S. News & World Report.

Medical school faculty received $443.8 million in sponsored research funding in fiscal year 2019. Ranked 18th nationally in NIH dollars received, the school is best known for its work in infectious disease, brain health, heart disease, cancer, transplantation, orthopaedics, pediatrics, renal disease, ophthalmology, and geriatrics. 

Physician faculty in Emory’s own and affiliate teaching hospitals and outpatient venues were responsible for 6.8 million patient service visits in 2018. Alumni totals: 6,139 medical school, 11,824 residency/fellowship, 6,574 allied health, including 1,462 PT and 1,887 PA alumni. In addition, 9,867 physicians and other health care professionals participated in continuing medical education classes offered by Emory in 2018. 

At a glance: 

  • The school has 3,166 full- and part-time faculty and 816 volunteer faculty. 

  • The school had more than 10,376 applications in 2019 for 138 first-year medical student positions. This class is composed of 53% women and 25% racial minorities, and 76% of the class members were out of college for at least a year before entering medical school. 

  • In 2019, the pass rate for first-time takers of step 1 of the National Board Exam was 96%. 

  • The school has 582 medical students and trains 1,322 residents and fellows in 107 accredited programs. The school has 92 MD/PhD students in one of 48 NIH-sponsored Medical Scientist Training Programs. 

  • The medical school shares a biomedical engineering department with Georgia Tech that is ranked third in the country by U.S. News & World Report. 

  • The medical school offers a joint MD/MSCR (master’s in clinical research) degree, an MD/MPH degree with public health, and an MD/ MA in bioethics with Laney Graduate School. Dual programs with law (juris master) and business (MBA) also are available. 

  • Some 133 medical faculty also train predoctoral bioscience researchers in eight programs in the Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences. 

  • Faculty in five allied health programs train 522 students. These include physician assistant (PA) and physical therapy (PT) programs, each ranked fifth in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. 

  • Medical school faculty received $443.8 million in sponsored research funding in fiscal year 2019. 

  • Ranked 18th nationally in NIH dollars received, the school is best known for its work in infectious disease, brain health, heart disease, cancer, transplantation, orthopaedics, pediatrics, renal disease, ophthalmology, and geriatrics. 

  • Physician faculty in Emory’s own and affiliate teaching hospitals and outpatient venues were responsible for 6.8 million patient service visits in 2018. 

  • Alumni totals: 6,139 medical school, 11,824 residency/fellowship, 6,574 allied health, including 1,462 PT and 1,887 PA alumni. 

9,867 physicians and other health care professionals participated in continuing medical education classes offered by Emory in 2018.

Founded in 1854, Emory University School of Medicine is ranked among the nation’s finest institutions for education, biomedical research, and patient care. Emory University School of Medicine has 3,166 full- and part-time faculty and 816 volunteer faculty.

Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing produces nursing leaders who are transforming health care through science, education, practice, and policy worldwide. It has 490 baccalaureate, more than 300 masters, 31 PhD, and 75 DNP students as well as five postdoctoral fellows.  The number of PhD students and post-doctoral fellows includes those participating in the NINR-supported T32 program focused on interventions in chronic illness. Students who complete their degrees go on to become national and international leaders in patient care, public health, government, and education.

The school offers a traditional Bachelor of Science in Nursing undergraduate program with a strong foundation in liberal arts and nursing.  Three different accelerated Bachelor of Science in Nursing degree options are available for students with degrees in other fields.  The three options are the accelerated BSN, accelerated BSN+MSN, and the distance accelerated BSN.  The master’s program offers opportunities to specialize in advanced nursing practice in nine specialty areas with training provided in a number of clinical settings and roles.  Two opportunities for dual-degree master’s programs are available with the Rollins School of Public Health and Laney’s Graduate School’s Master of Arts in Bioethics.  Our DNP program focuses on two tracks, Post BSN DNP and Post MSN DNP with a focus in either Health Systems Leadership or Population Health.  Graduates of our MSN and DNP programs are qualified to seek certification as nurse practitioners, nurse midwives, and/or clinical nurse specialists. The school’s PhD program is focused on generating new knowledge to improve health and health care quality and developing the next generation of nurse scientists and educators who will change the face of health care. The program also prepares our students to become researchers, and since 2010, our PhD students have received 16 NIH NRSA fellowships.  

In fiscal year 2018, the school received $17.9 million in external sponsored funding and $8.9 million in National Institutes of Health research funding, ranking 3rd nationally in NIH funding among schools of nursing.  U.S. News & World Report ranked the school’s graduate programs 4th overall. Major programs include the Fuld Fellowship, targeting second-career students with interest in serving vulnerable populations or palliative care patients; the Lillian Carter Center for Global Health and Social Responsibility; and the Maternal and Newborn Health in Ethiopia Partnership. 

The school has 350 full and part-time faculty and instructors, and students can learn from adjunct faculty at some 500 clinical sites, including an alternative winter break in three countries and a multi-university, multidisciplinary summer program with Georgia migrant farmworkers. The school has 8,076 alumni.

The Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing Biobehavioral Research Laboratory includes 600 sq ft of dedicated space that serves as a resource for use by School of Nursing and affiliated researchers. This laboratory is equipped for processing and analyzing samples and are outfitted with refrigerated centrifuges, a spectrophotometer, a real-time PCR system, a cold room, hoods, an upright refrigerator and ice machine, and seven ultralow freezers connected to an alarm system and equipped with CO2-back up system for long-term storage of biospecimens, printers and software for sample labels printing, 2D barcode scanners for biospecimens inventory tracking. Additionally, the lab is equipped with a plate reader, ultrapure water maker, pipettes, a dry block Incubators, a shaker, a vortex, mini centrifuges, a pH-meter, blood drawing supplies, processing tubes and other equipment and supplies needed to advance the range of biobehavioral research conducted in the School of Nursing.

The Nell Hodgson Woodruff School of Nursing produces nursing leaders who are transforming health care through science, education, practice, and policy worldwide. It has 490 baccalaureate, more than 300 masters, 31 PhD, and 75 DNP students as well as five postdoctoral fellows.

Rollins School of Public Health
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1990, the Rollins School of Public Health has 1,164 master’s degree students and 180 PhD students who choose from degree options in behavioral sciences and health education, biostatistics and bioinformatics, epidemiology, environmental health, health policy and management, and global health. A leader in interdisciplinary studies, the school offers dual-degree programs with medicine, nursing, physician assistant, physical therapy, business, theology, law, and the graduate school. A distance-based master’s program, the Executive MPH, allows professionals to pursue a degree while they are employed. 

In fiscal year 2018, the school received $132.9 million in research funding, supporting e orts in cancer prevention, cardiovascular epidemiology, nutrition, environmental health, HIV/AIDS, safe water, tobacco control, mental health, addictive behaviors, injury and violence, antibiotic resistance, diabetes and obesity, and health services. e school ranks sixth nationally in NIH funding. 

Many of the 304 full- and part-time faculty and 450 adjunct faculty in six academic departments are linked by appointments, shared programs, or research grants with the CDC, Carter Center, American Cancer Society, CARE, Arthritis Foundation, Task Force for Global Health, and state and local public health agencies. Through these partnerships and in its role as a center for international health research and training, the school helps make Atlanta a worldwide destination for public health. The school is ranked h among peer institutions by U.S. News & World Report. It has 9,094 alumni. 

sph.emory.edu 

Founded in 1990, the Rollins School of Public Health has 1,164 master’s degree students and 180 PhD students who choose from degree options in behavioral sciences and health education, biostatistics and bioinformatics, epidemiology, environmental health, health policy and management, an...

Rollins School of Public Health - Resources
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

Laboratory:
RSPH has occupied a new laboratory building effectively quintupling useful research facilities.There are three floors of laboratory space totaling approximately 20000 ft2.The laboratories are not dedicated to specific departments but rather researchers with common research interests and potential to share equipment and supplies are grouped into clusters.Laboratory benches have been assigned to investigators using a model of shared research space. The open design allows for easy expansion and contraction of assigned bench space as projects come on line or are completed. Space includes thirty-six laboratory benches, several large fume hoods, instrumentation rooms, tissue culture rooms, and adequate water, gas, electrical, and other services to ensure proper laboratory practice. The laboratory has 6 new mass spectrometers (GC-MS/MS and GC-MS ; HPLC-­MS/MS and HPLC-MS, FTMS and ICP-MS) that enable the analysis of the entire gamut of environmental toxicants, hormones, and other organic and inorganic compounds ranging from metals to proteins. Specifically, this equipment will include an Agilent 6460 Series triple quadrupole HPLC tandem mass spectrometer with an APCI/ESI interface for the analysis of polar chemicals in biological and environmental samples, an Agilent 7000 GC tandem mass spectrometer with EI and CI interfaces allowing the analysis of volatile and semi-volatile chemicals in multiple matrices, an Agilent 7700 ICP-MS with a micronebulizer equipped with an HPLC to facilitate the analysis of metals and speciated metals in multiple matrices, an Agilent GC/MS 5975C inert XL EI/CI MSD/DS Turbo CI System with autosampler and thermostatted column, an Agilent LCMS Single Quad AJS Superior Line Bundle Which includes G6150B quadrupole, Agilent Jet Stream, autosampler,and thermostatted column.Dionex Accelerated Solvent Extraction System, a Thermo Finnigan LTQ-FTMS which allows for high resolution analysis, metabolite identification, and metabolomics and a Shimadzu UV-2600 UV/VIS Spectrophotometer equipped with an autosampler and microsipper kit. All instrumentation will be networked to the Rollins School of Public Health and Emory University network systems affording rapid and secure data transfer to locations within the Emory system.Other existing equipment available include glassware, reagent storage areas, PCR equipment (including three PCR thermocyclers, general preparatory equipment, a FastPrep for preparation of samples for detection of protozoans, and two shared RT-PCR units; electrophoresis systems; water quality analysis equipment (including several membrane filtration set-ups and an IDEXX Quantitray sealer); There are several portable units for carrying out field measurements of physiochemical water quality parameters (colorimeter, turbidimeter, pH meter) as well as portable membrane filtration units for use in remote locations and networked laboratory computer facilities using networked Dell computers operating speeds of at least 1.5 GHz and equipped with at least 100 GB mass storage devices.Further, the RSPH maintains a Hewlett-Packard 5890 Gas Chromatograph equipped with both a flame ionization detector, and electron capture detector; a Perkin-Elmer 4100ZL Zeeman-corrected atomic absorption spectrophotometer with graphite furnace and hollow cathode lamps specific for various metals; a Shimadzu High Performance Liquid Chromatograph, Model LC-10AT capable of four-mobile phase gradient elution, equipped with a SPD-10A UV/VIS detector, a RF-10A Spectrofluorometric Detector, an SIL-10 Auto Injector, and an SIL-10A System Controller; a Microbalance, as well as other balances. Included within the general laboratory facilities is a Milli-Q 18 MΩ ion-free water supply system, cold-storage room (-10oC), isotope counting rooms, biological safety cabinets, clean-room technology and numerous -80 and -20oC freezers with available space for long-term storage of samples.

Animal:  
Emory University has centralized administration and management of its animal resources through the Division of Animal Resources, which provides programs, facilities, personnel and equipment for animal care. The animal husbandry program includes the provision of proper housing, sanitation, and nourishment. The animal health program is under the direction of five full-time veterinarians who provide veterinary care to all Case-owned laboratory animals. Veterinary medical care consists of quarantine and isolation, preventive medicine programs, anesthesiology and surgical support, daily observation, treatment or intervention for injury and illness, humane euthanasia, and diagnostic laboratory services. Animals are observed and provided care and veterinary services are available during normal working hours and on weekends and holidays. Emergency care is available during all non-business hours.

Cores:
Biostatistics/Bioinformatics Core: The primary objective of the Biostatistics Core is to strengthen the statistical rigor of research and investigators’ capacity to mine biodata from multiple sources. The specific functions of the core are to: 1) Support and Guidance for Design Issues 2) Provide guidance and support to all Projects for epidemiological modeling, including development of methodologies for identifying and characterizing mixtures and their health effects 3) Methodological Development 4) Evaluate and Correct for Measurement Error 5) Archive, Document and Assure Security of Analytic Data Files. The Biostatistics Core is based in the Rollins School of Public Health at Emory University. The Information Technology (IT) Department of the Rollins School of Public Health maintains a Linux cluster computing environment that supports the latest scientific tools for performing data analysis and statistical modeling. It is expandable and offers both a stable platform for high performance computing as well as a development platform from which to migrate to the larger cluster environment maintained at the University level. The cluster consists of a head node with 8 cpus at 3 Ghz with 32 GB RAM, and 6 compute nodes with 4 – 16 CPUs and 16 – 96 GB RAM at each node. The head node provides access to a development environment for user applications. The compute nodes exclusively run user programs in a batch environment for maximum throughput. The cluster environment stores its data on a HIPAA compliant Storage Area Network (SAN). All cluster nodes connect to the SAN via a dedicated 2GB Fibre Channel private connection. There is 2TB of shared disk space attached to the cluster. Storage space exclusive to specific research projects can be purchased and added to the cluster.

Computer:  (see below for expanded computer/technology resources)
Resources necessary to complete the tasks shown above include telecommunications equipment, computer facilities, Internet access, and laboratory equipment and space. Emory University maintains a large telephone network complete with all modern facilities including voice/data transmission, voice mail, teleconferencing, and video transmission.  RSPH maintains extensive computing resources for computing, data management, back-up, and software delivery. Computing services are provided by a Sun SunFire V1280, with 12 1.2GHz UltraSparc IIIci processors and 24G RAM. Storage is provided through a storage area network (SAN) over a fibre channel network, with 1 terabyte of RAID-protected storage dedicated to the compute server. The server hosts analysis and programming tools including: SAS, SPlus, Fortran 77/90, C, C++, Gauss, Java, R, and IMSL. Services are provided to the desktop using the X Windows interface. The Emory/RSPH mail server, which also provides primary DNS services, is a Sun SunFire V880 with 4 900MHz UltraSparc III CPUs with 8G RAM and 1.4 terabytes of protected storage (some mirrored internal fibre channel drives, and some on external RAID arrays connected via fibre channel). The primary web server is an identical machine with 146G of mirrored fibre channel storage. The main database server is a Dell PowerEdge 2650 with dual Pentium 4 Xeon processors and 8G RAM, running Windows 2003 and MS-SQL Server. The SAN provides access to 265G of RAID-protected storage. Web access to this database is provided by Macromedia's ColdFusion application server, which runs on a Dell PowerEdge 2650 (dual P4 Xeon, 4G RAM) running RedHat Enterprise Linux. Based on Windows NT, seven servers work together to provide file and print service to the school's desktop network. These state-of-the-art systems provide general use programs, including statistical and mathematical modeling software, database management, graphics and office support tools. The Emory/RSPH network consists of Fast Ethernet hardware running TCP/IP. Gigabit Ethernet provides high speed (10 Mbps) access to most desktop computers and peripheral devices. At least two Dell Optiplex desktop computers with Pentium IV configuration and 512 megabytes RAM memory will be made available for this project. The research group has excellent computer facilities which afford easy access to data on network as well as adequate computing power for data analysis.  Available workstations are all IBM-PC or Apple Mac compatible computers, generally with Core 2 processors and at least 2 GB of main memory, and hard drives in excess of 100 GB.  Rollins School of Public Health maintains a school-wide network affording easy exchange of data among all computer systems.  A “Common Drive” system of servers is available that allows controlled access of all data files from both inside the School using a Microsoft NT based network system and from outside the School using Microsoft Virtual Private Network.  The facilities are maintained by a staff dedicated to this endeavor and funded out if University and indirect source.  All common software packages, including those for statistical analysis and modeling are available on the network or for a nominal medium charge from the Information Technologies Division of Emory University.

Office:  
The Emory/RSPH telephone network includes voice/data transmission, voice mail, facsimile, teleconferencing, and video transmission. Hewlett Packard ScanJet digital scanners and Cannon ImageRunner photocopiers are also available.

Major Equipment at RSPH:

Equipment

Capabilities

ThermoFinnigan LTQ-MS high Resolution mass spectrometer with LC interface

Quantification of analytes, metabolomics (exposomics), identification of unknown chemicals

Agilent 6460 Triple quadrapole mass spectrometer with an HPLC and APCI and ESI interfaces

Analysis of polar organic chemicals in biological and

environmental matrices

Agilent 7000 Triple quadrupole mass Spectrometer with a GC and EI or CI capabilities

Analysis of volatile and semi-volatile organic chemicals in biological and environmental matrices

Agilent 7700xx  ICP-MS with an HPLC interface

Analysis of total metal and speciated metal concentrations in biological and environmental samples

Gas chromatograph Hewlett Packard 5890 Series II equipped with ECD and FPD

Analysis of organochlorine pesticides in biological and environmental samples

Gas chromatograph Agilent Techonlogies 7890A equipped with 5975C inert XL EI/CI MSD 

Analysis of pesticides and their metabolites  in biological and environmental samples

HPLC Shimadzu

Analysis of pesticide metabolites in laboratory test samples

Atomic absorption spectrophotometer, Graphite furnace, Perkin Elmer 4100   

Analysis of metals biological and environmental samples

Agilent G33174A mass spectrometer with a 7890A gas chromatograph with dual EI/CI Ionization

Analysis of non-polar organic chemicals in multiple matrices

Agilent G6150B quadrupole mass spectrometer with an Agilent 1200 HPLC and a jetstream ESI and APCI interface with an N2 generator

Analysis of polar organic chemicals in multiple matrices

Accelerated solvent extraction system

Extraction of a wide array of chemicals from solid matrices

Automated 96-well plate UV-Vis/Fluorescence
immunoassay plate readers

Hormone and other immunoassays

 

Expanded Computer/Technological Resources
RSPH has a state-of-the-art desktop and server infrastructure that supports over 2500 users. From the ground up, it was designed to be modular and expandable so as to give the School the greatest computing capability, flexibility, and growth potential. The RSPH network consists of Fast Ethernet hardware running TCP/IP. Gigabit Ethernet provides high speed transmission to each of 10 floors and across three buildings. Ethernet provides high speed (100 Mbps) access to most desktop computers and peripheral devices. The network terminates at over 900 locations. Each contains three connections (2 UTP and 1 Fiber). More than 45 miles of UTP CAT 5 2061 cable and more than 18 miles of fiberoptic cable provide the capability of high-speed voice, video, or data to every desktop. The RSPH network is connected to the Emory Campus backbone via a 100 Mbps Ethernet connection, making campus services and wide area network services readily available.

Desktop Computers: Currently, new computers are at least a Core 2 Duo configuration with 2GB of RAM memory, and have CD/DVD-RW and flat panel monitors standard.

Server Environment
The school’s server environment is based on a combination of UNIX and Windows and can be divided into a number of service areas:

Computer Services: The core of the compute services is provided by a high-performance computing cluster composed of 18 nodes with an aggregate of 354 processors and 3 TB of RAM. Storage is provided through our storage area network (SAN) and the central Isilon storage with 200 terabytes of RAID-protected HIPAA-compliant storage local on the cluster. The server hosts analysis and programming tools including: SAS, SPlus, gFortran, C, C++, Java, R, and MATLAB. The application environments are 64 bit and parallel computing enabled when the product supports the capability. Services are provided to the desktop using the X Windows and Univa Grid Engine interfaces.

Internet/Web Services: The email services are provided by a central campus resource through Office 365, and we have access through a browser or direct interface such as Outlook. Secure and open access web services are provided. The secure web areas can be restricted to the Emory network or an account. There are a number of services that support various CMS, JAVA environments, and other web services. The school takes advantage of a central IT CMS service called Cascade for our main school website. All Rollins web content is served up through our local web servers, which also support center, program, and personal faculty research websites. A number of application environments to support research endeavors such as a Cold Fusion development server, RedCap, and Feedback server survey tools are available.

Database Services: Both secure and academic database services utilizing Microsoft SQL Server 2008 and MySQL instance are available. These databases are used to service a number of application systems across administrative and research needs. Database accounts are available for any faculty member upon request.

File and Print Services: Based on Windows NT, seven servers work together to provide file and print service to the School's desktop network. These state-of-the-art systems provide the latest in general use programs, including statistical and mathematical modeling software, database management, graphics and office support tools.

Network Environment
Rollins’ network consists of Fast Ethernet hardware running TCP/IP. Ten Gigabit Ethernet provides high-speed transmission to the Rollins campus buildings and all other buildings across campus. Ethernet provides high-speed (100 Mbps) access to most desktop computers and peripheral devices. The network terminates at over 2,500 locations.

The Rollins network is connected to the Emory Campus backbone via a 10 Gigabit Ethernet connection, making campus services and wide area network services readily available. Rollins has an extensive wireless network providing “N” class connections and speeds that cover all of buildings and the nearby external areas. This network has guest services as well as secure services for faculty and staff.

Voice communications are connected into a Unified Communications system that provides phones through VOIP and are integrated with our email systems for VMail access. All the secured services inside our firewalls including network storage and other services can be access through the Emory VPN.

Information Security
The Rollins School of Public Health information technology environment is a HIPAA-covered entity and complies with HIPAA and Emory information security and privacy policies and practices. In compliance with these policies and practices, Rollins aligns with the National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) special publications (800 series) for identifying, assessing, and managing information security risk within a technology environment.

Drawing on federal and industry best practices, Rollins has implemented a series of multi-layered security controls to protect the integrity, reliability, and confidentiality of data. A sample of the key security controls includes:

  • An annual risk assessment of all Rollins information technology assets with their level of risk, potential impact, probability, and controls evaluated based on NIST SP 800-30 Risk Management Guide for Information Technology Systems.
  • Rollins and Emory networks are protected by firewalls and intrusion detection devices. Rules on these devices are set to deny all traffic by default and "allows" are written as exceptions. These devices are updated as appropriate through Emory University's change management process and evaluated to ensure they provide the appropriate level of protection based on the sensitivity level of the data.
  • Servers are housed within a secured network operating center (NOC). The NOC has environmental controls (fire, water, temperature), is accessible only through a two-factor authorization system (key card and passcode), and is accessible only by authorized information technology personnel. In the event of a power outage, the NOC devices will draw UPS power from a backup generator.
  • All servers are configured based on Rollins and Emory University best practices. Only authorized, trained system administrators have administrative privileges on the servers. System administrators monitor security mailing lists and sites and patch/update systems based on priority of the patch. All servers are periodically scanned for vulnerabilities and any identified vulnerabilities are assessed and managed.
  • All information technology personnel go through background checks before gaining access to administrative privileges. At the point of termination with Emory, all information technology personnel's administrative privileges are removed.
  • Protected health information (PHI) data and the services that manage them are stored on a separate network and server infrastructure with limited access and additional security controls.
  • Data is backed up daily. Backups are stored in a tiered structure for disaster recovery purposes and include local, off-site, and out-of-state storage. Data stored off-site is encrypted to prevent compromise and can only be retrieved by authorized personnel.
  • Data written to any Rollins file servers is checked with server-based anti-virus software. Access to data is verified with a local single point of contact within each department before any access control is granted. Principal investigators are required to review access control lists each year to ensure continued accuracy.
  • All Rollins desktops are configured based on best practices in the industry as well as those outlined in NIST SP 800-69 Guidance for Securing Microsoft Windows XP Systems for IT Professionals: A NIST Security Configuration Checklist. All Windows machines have anti-virus software installed with updated virus signatures as well as the latest Microsoft XP Professional updates. Desktops require authentication from the Emory Active Directory to gain access to network services.
  • Security policies are created and reviewed through the Woodruff Health Sciences Center HIPAA committee, the Emory University Technology Infrastructure and Policy committee, and local policies through the Rollins Information Technology Advisory committee.

Conference rooms
The RSPH Claudia Nance Rollins Building and Grace Crum Rollins Building have conference rooms that allow for the easy hookup of laptops and other computers to be displayed on a large LCD or a projected screen, which can be used by the study team on an as-needed basis. Each conference room has access to the CATV systems as well. Audio conferencing is built into the room where no external sound units are required to hold a conference call. Each conference room has connectivity abilities for high-end video conferencing systems that are wheeled in on a cart. The cart provides a Picture Tel system that can share up to four sessions and all of the content and sound connected in the room. The audio and video integrated in the room are also available for any PC hooked up to the systems so audio can be captured in the room and then used for PC-based video conferencing systems such as Skype.

Data protection and backup
Full back ups of the HPC and servers are conducted once a week with incremental back-ups on other nights. These back-ups are kept for 90 days and are encrypted at an off-site location. Network shares have snapshots taken nightly, which are kept for 30 days.

Email/Vmail
We use a central IT services resource using Microsoft Office365 for our email. Our email is considered sensitive, so we have policies in place that control automated routing of email and we use a central spam engine to control propagation of virus and spam attacks. Our phone voice mail system is integrated with our email, so voice mails automatically produce email audio files upon receipt.

Office
Secretarial and computer support (including fax, e-mail, Internet, color printing, scanning and photocopying) are available to all Public Health faculty.

Other
Six campus libraries are available for use, including the Woodruff Library for Advanced Studies, and the Health Sciences Center Library. The university library system has access to thousands of journals and periodicals as well as, reference services which include computerized database searching. Computer laboratory and audiovisual facilities are also available within the university system. The CDC library is also available for use.

 

Yerkes National Primate Research Center
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1930 and dedicated to discovering causes, prevention, treatments, and cures, Yerkes National Primate Research Center (NPRC) is fighting diseases and improving human health and lives worldwide. One of seven NPRCs funded by the NIH, Yerkes conducts studies that make breakthrough discoveries possible. Yerkes research involves 1,000 nonhuman primates at its main center on the Emory campus and another 2,000 at its field station in Lawrenceville, Ga. The center also has 7,500 rodents in its research vivaria. 

Yerkes has 348 staff members and 54 faculty scientists. Supported by $74.7 million in research funding (all sources) in fiscal year 2018, Yerkes ranks first in NIH funding among NPRCs. Yerkes grounds its research in scientific integrity, expert knowledge, respect for colleagues, an open exchange of ideas, and compassionate, quality animal care. Researchers are making landmark discoveries in microbiology and immunology; neurologic diseases; neuropharmacology; behavioral, cognitive, and developmental neuroscience; and psychiatric disorders. The center’s research advances vaccine development for infectious and noninfectious diseases, paves the way for earlier diagnosis of and new treatments for illnesses such as Alzheimer’s and Parkinson’s, defines the neurobiology and genetics of social behavior to support new therapies for autism spectrum and other disorders as well as drug addiction, and teaches us how interactions between genetics and environment shape who we are. 

The center follows regulations and guidelines established by the NIH, the U.S. Department of Agriculture, and more. Since 1984, it has been fully accredited by the AAALAC International, regarded as the gold seal of approval for laboratory animal care.

yerkes.emory.edu

Founded in 1930 and dedicated to discovering causes, prevention, treatments, and cures, Yerkes National Primate Research Center (NPRC) is fighting diseases and improving human health and lives worldwide. One of seven NPRCs funded by the NIH, Yerkes conducts studies that make breakthrough disc...

Winship Cancer Institute
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Founded in 1937, Winship Cancer Institute is the only National Cancer Institute–Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in Georgia and one of only 50 in the country. Winship has 450 faculty, who received $82.4 million in research funding reported in 2018, with $21.2 million from the NCI. Faculty include investigators in the schools of medicine, public health, and nursing; Emory College; and Georgia Tech. They collaborate with professionals from around the world and with national and state agencies, including the CDC, American Cancer Society, Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance, and Georgia Research Alliance. 

Winship physicians provide care at Emory University Hospital, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, Emory Proton Therapy Center, Grady Memorial Hospital, the Atlanta VA Medical Center, and Aflac Cancer Center at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. In addition to using state-of-the-art approaches to therapy, Winship facilitates cancer prevention, treatment, and survivorship through support groups and integrated complementary therapies. 

Winship investigators conducted more than 250 clinical trials and enrolled 850 participants in these trials in 2018. Winship has the largest unit in Georgia for phase 1 clinical trials, which are important to introducing new therapies against cancer. Winship works with the Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education to partner with community-based physicians to expand availability of clinical trials throughout Georgia. Winship also serves patients through the Winship Cancer Network, a partnership with community hospitals enhancing access to research and treatment. 

winshipcancer.emory.edu  

 

Founded in 1937, Winship Cancer Institute is the only National Cancer Institute–Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center in Georgia and one of only 50 in the country. Winship has 450 faculty, who received $82.4 million in research funding reported in 2018, with $21.2 million from the NCI....

Winship Cancer Institute - Facilities and Other Resources
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Scientific Environment:

The Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University has a strong multi-disciplinary team of oncologists, thoracic surgeons, radiation oncologists, interventional pulmonologists and pathologists dedicated to the treatment and research of lung cancer.

Facilities:

Winship Building C:

Winship is headquartered in a seven-story 250,000 square foot building (Building C) housing the primary offices and clinical space for cancer services including the Winship Ambulatory Infusion Center, the department of radiation oncology primary clinical facility, and the medical oncology, hematology, and surgical oncology clinics. Breast imaging and radiology, including MRI, PET, and CT facilities, are also located in this building. Building C houses the Winship administrative suite, three floors of wet lab space, faculty offices, and is the primary location of the Winship Clinical Trials Office (CTO). Also located on the Winship main campus is the Patient and Family Resource Center, staffed with dedicated providers for supportive oncology, survivorship, social services, nutrition, and spiritual counseling.

Winship Clinical Trials Office (CTO):

The CTO is managed by Winship and partially supported by its Cancer Center Support Grant (P30CA138292). 

Staffed by highly-trained professional research personnel specializing in areas of clinical coordination, data management, specimen processing and regulatory management, Winship CTO provides a supportive environment to conduct clinical trials in a cost-effective and efficient manner while ensuring compliance with Winship clinical trials standard operating procedures, Good Clinical Practice (GCP), Emory University Institutional Review Board (IRB), US Food and Drug Administration (FDA), other regulatory agencies and external sponsors. Winship CTO supports clinical research at other Emory University Hospital sites, including Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital, Emory Johns Creek Hospital, and the Emory Proton Therapy Center. Additionally, support is provided at other area facilities where Emory investigators conduct clinical trials, including the Atlanta VA Medical Center and Grady Memorial Hospital. 

See https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/research/clinical-trials-office/index.html

The Winship CTO has developed policies and procedures to facilitate centralized management of clinical studies across all departments in which subjects may be enrolled on cancer clinical trials. CTO staff monitors study procedures to ensure regulatory compliance and provides regular instruction to new and current staff in these areas. Training of clinical research coordinators across all of Winship is assisted and supervised by the CTO Director and leadership staff. Winship CTO provides support for 12 different disease-specific research working, each fully staffed with a team of research coordinators and nurses. The CTO currently employs over 128 individuals.

Ambulatory Infusion Center and the Phase I Clinical Trials Unit:

Infusion centers are located at Winship Cancer Institute, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Emory Saint Joseph's Hospital and Emory Johns Creek Hospital. These facilities provide referring physicians and their patients access to a full range of outpatient infusion and injection services.

Phase I Unit:

The Winship Phase I Unit, located on the fourth floor of the Emory University Hospital Tower, recently expanded in 2018 and tripled the size of the old unit, originally opened in 2009. The current unit is designed to be both patient-focused and able to support the painstaking demands of rigorous clinical research. It features 15 private treatment bays, four clinic rooms, plus many key support resources, including a dedicated lab for processing patient blood work, a dedicated secure medication room and a "fast track" bay with three chairs for rapid use by patients who might only require a short visit such as a research lab draw. The design of the space was guided by a multi-disciplinary team of patients, nurses, physicians, and research staff. It can also be used for obtaining PK and PD samples. During phase 1 trials, correlative science blood, tissue, and tumor samples (pharmacogenomic, pharmacokinetic, and pharmacodynamic markers) are obtained in the Phase I Unit and processed, stored, and shipped from the Phase I Unit laboratory.

Additional Space on Emory’s main campus:

Winship space is divided between Emory Clinic A and B Buildings, Tufts House, Gatewood House, the Health Sciences Research Building, and the North Decatur Building. Emory Clinic Building B houses animal facilities, research laboratories, faculty offices, the Emory Ambulatory Surgery Center, urology, neuro-oncology, neurological surgery, and additional facilities for the Winship CTO. Additional administrative offices, supportive oncology services, and conference rooms are located in the Tufts House, immediately adjacent to the Winship Building C. The Health Sciences Research Building (HSRB), a 200,000 gsf research building on Emory’s campus, opened for occupancy in June 2013. Winship was committed 13,000 gsf of total research space under its authority in this building.

 

Laboratory:

In total, Winship has over 480,000 sq. ft. of dedicated space for basic, translational, and clinical cancer research space with the inclusion of The Emory Clinic Building C, the Health Sciences Research Building, and other areas, including space in Buildings A and B of The Emory Clinic, Emory University Hospital Midtown, Grady Memorial Hospital, and the Atlanta VA Medical Center. Medical, surgical and radiation oncology outpatient services, ambulatory clinical services, and many research services have been consolidated into a single building, Emory Clinic C, which contains over 250,000 sq. ft. of devoted research and clinical space. 

Research laboratories are located on the 3rd, 4th, and 5th floors on both Clinic Buildings B and C, and in the Health Sciences Research Building. All laboratories are equipped with various basic instruments including separate tissue culture rooms with laminar flow hoods, type-II biosafety cabinets, and CO2 regulated incubators. Winship has shared cryogenic storage facility, wash room, microscopy room, dark room, and walk-in cold room, which are adjacent to the wet space and are easily accessible.

 

Animal:

Cancer Animal Models is a shared resource managed and supported by Winship Cancer Institute. The function of the Cancer Animal Models Shared Resource is to assist investigators in the development, characterization and analysis of appropriate animal models for cancer research. It assists investigators in developing and analyzing appropriate animal models for cancer research, and as such it plays an important role in translating research discoveries into potential treatments.  Currently, the major emphasis and expertise of the facility lies in genetically engineered mouse models. 

See https://winshipcancer.emory.edu/research/shared-resources/cancer-animal-models.html

 

Clinical:

Clinical activities of the Winship Cancer Institute occur within Winship itself, the Emory University campus, Emory Midtown Hospital campus, Emory Johns Creek, Emory St. Joseph’ Grady Health System campus, and Veterans Administration Hospital. The Winship building adds 68,035 sq. ft. of lab space, plus additional oncology support services for a total of 108,000 sq. ft. of clinical space. Clinical care is located in the tunnel and floors 1 and 2, while research occurs on floors 3, 4, and 5. A Phase I clinical trial unit was established specifically for Phase I trials and is currently in operation. The building is directly across from the Emory-Children’s Hospital and the Emory Children’s Clinic.

 

 

 

Scientific Environment:...

Emory Global Health Institute
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 2006 with a mission of advancing Emory University’s efforts to improve health around the world, the Emory Global Health Institute (EGHI) has supported Emory faculty and student global health projects in close to 100 countries. The EGHI also leads externally funded programs designed to improve the health of the world’s most vulnerable populations. 

www.globalhealth.emory.edu

 

 

Founded in 2006 with a mission of advancing Emory University’s efforts to improve health around the world, the Emory Global Health Institute (EGHI) has supported Emory faculty and student global health projects in close to 100 countries. The EGHI also leads externally funded programs de...

Emory Healthcare
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Emory Healthcare, with more than 22,600 employees and 11 hospitals, is the most comprehensive academic health system in Georgia. Emory Healthcare has $3.57 billion in annual net revenue and provides $98 million in charity care. System-wide, it has 2,691 licensed patient beds, nearly 2,800 physicians practicing in more than 70 specialties, and serves metro Atlanta with 250 locations. Emory Healthcare is the only health system in Georgia with three Magnet-designated hospitals, Emory Saint Joseph's Hospital, Emory University Hospital, and Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital, for nursing excellence. Emory Healthcare’s mission is to improve the health of individuals and communities at home and throughout the world.

 

For more information, visit www.emoryhealthcare.org

 

See http://whsc.emory.edu/about/components/emory-healthcare.html

Emory Healthcare, with more than 22,600 employees and 11 hospitals, is the most comprehensive academic health system in Georgia. Emory Healthcare has $3...

The Laney Graduate School - Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences
Last Updated: February 07, 2020
The Laney Graduate School and the Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 
The Laney Graduate School is home to over 40 PhD Programs spanning the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.  Most students working in biomedical fields are in programs based in the Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences (GDBBS), a Division of the graduate school that includes eight interdisciplinary, interdepartmental graduate programs. These programs include:
  • Biochemistry, Cell, and Developmental Biology
  • Cancer Biology
  • Genetics and Molecular Biology
  • Immunology and Molecular Pathogenesis
  • Microbiology and Molecular Genetics
  • Molecular and Systems Pharmacology
  • Neuroscience
  • Population Biology, Ecology, and Evolution

Around 400 PhD students receive their training in the labs of over 340 faculty members who are located across all of the major academic units on campus. Students also have the opportunity to work with faculty members at Yerkes National Primate Research Center, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and the Veterans Administration Medical Center. Students are enrolled in a specific program that fits their broad interests. Due to the interdepartmental nature of the programs in the GDBBS students work with faculty from many different departments, which provides a truly interdisciplinary training experience. The programs offer a well-defined course of study, a small cohort of entering students in each program, and a community of faculty who are all invested in the success of each student.

Institutional support for graduate education at Emory is very strong. Successful applicants enrolling in GDBBS Programs receive 21 months of full support from institutional funds and are supported by research grants, training grants, or other individual fellowships for the remainder of their training. Several of the Programs are affiliated with a pre-doctoral training grant, typically from the National Institutes of Health.
 
The School of Medicine’s MD/PhD Program provides the opportunity for exceptionally bright and dedicated students to acquire both clinical and basic research training in order to pursue challenging careers in academic medicine. The Program is designed to provide students with the in-depth, high-caliber research training and medical education required of future leaders in biomedical research. Students are enrolled in both the Laney Graduate School and the School of Medicine during the approximately seven years required to complete both degrees in the Program. Many MD/PhD students select a Program within the GDBBS for the PhD component of their degree. The MD/PhD Program is funded in part through the National Institutes of Health’s Medical Scientist Training program. Additional support derives from Emory University, the School of Medicine, and the Laney Graduate School.
 
Students in GDBBS Programs receive training in critical thinking, creative problem solving, effective communication, and technical skills relevant to their field, all in preparation for successful careers in academic or nonacademic venues. Some GDBBS students continue their training as postdoctoral fellows at top research institutions around the world. Other students choose positions in industry, scientific communication, public policy, commercialization, education and outreach, nonacademic lab science, and more.  Professional development and career planning activities help enable students to make informed decisions for their career path, and help to prepare them for the career of their choice.
 
The Laney Graduate School and the Graduate Division of Biological and Biomedical Sciences 
The Laney Graduate School is home to over 40 PhD Programs spanning the natural sciences, social sciences, and humanities.  Most students working in biomedical fi...
The Emory Office of Postdoctoral Education (OPE)
Last Updated: January 29, 2020
The Emory University Office of Postdoctoral Education (OPE) has been the home for the formation and enforcement of Postdoc policies since 1999. Although established to oversee and serve the needs of the nearly 700 PhD postdoctoral fellows working across the entire Emory University Campus, OPE programs and resources are available to everyone at Emory. https://med.emory.edu/postdoc/
 
OPE Coursework:Working with faculty, OPE directs courses specifically designed for Postdocs, Junior Faculty and medical research fellows and addresses the requirements outlined for mentored trainees funded by NIH.  These courses address the following areas: Responsible Conduct of Research; Laboratory Management; and Rigor and Reproducibility.  
 
OPE Career Development Programs and Services: OPE provides tools for IDP’s and develops and offers workshops and programs throughout the year for grant writing and other research relevant career development activities, including but not limited to: 
OPE Sponsored Courses/Workshops - Additional Details:
The Responsible Conduct of Research Ethics course is offered twice each year and is specifically designed for PhD and MD trainees conducting basic, translational and clinical research. Using a case study and faculty-led approach, discussions on conflict of interest, authorship, research misconduct, data acquisition and management, collaborative and team science, human subjects, animal use, and mentor/mentee relationships provide a broad appreciation for the ethical issues of research. A separate two-hour workshop on Rigor and Reproducibility is offered twice each year.
 
F and K grant writing tutorial series are offered six times a year for trainees preparing federal and private grant applications. Focused on F32 and K award scholarships, each series is composed of three didactic sessions followed by individual revising sessions guided by a grants writer working with the Postdoctoral Fellows, Medical Research Fellows, or junior faculty. They have a proven track record with a success rate of funding upwards of 50% for applications submitted from postdoctoral fellows and junior faculty. Over 90% of Postdoctoral Fellows who receive K career development awards move to tenure-track faculty positions.  
 
The F32 Bootcamp is a 12-week series designed to help the Postdoctoral Fellow and their sponsor develop a mature and well-reviewed application. Each session addresses the specifics of a particular grant section and strategies that strengthen or weaken that section. Webinars are also created for each section so that attendees can re-review the material as they write their own section. A grant editor reviews each section and provides appropriate feedback, guidance, and editing. 
 
The Leadership and Management Certificate Program is comprised of nine workshops and is designed to encourage the development of other professional skills. These sessions are taught by the Emory University Goizueta Business School faculty and cover essential topics in executive education. The skills covered are designed to help Postdoctoral Fellows become better leaders and managers whether they are planning on running an academic laboratory or are moving to a corporate or non-profit environment. 
The Emory University Office of Postdoctoral Education (OPE) has been the home for the formation and enforcement of Postdoc policies since 1999. Although established to oversee and serve the needs of the nearly 700 PhD postdoctoral fellows working across the entire ...
Department of Medicine (DOM)
Last Updated: May 18, 2020

The Department of Medicine, with over 680 faculty, 430 staff, and over $120 M in sponsored research funding, is a key component of the School of Medicine and the Woodruff Health Sciences Center. The Department, School of Medicine, and WHSC are home to interdisciplinary, multi-school, multi-institutional, research-intensive programs of national and international prominence. Partners include the Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance, Center for AIDS Research, Emory Healthcare, Grady Memorial Hospital, Atlanta Veterans Administration Medical Center, Georgia Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, University of Georgia, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, and numerous international collaborations. 

The Department of Medicine, with over 680 faculty, ...

Division of Cardiology Overview
Last Updated: May 18, 2020
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DOM Data Analytics and Biostatistics (DAB) Core
Last Updated: January 29, 2020
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Division of Cardiology Microscopy and Histology Core
Last Updated: January 29, 2020
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Division of Endocrinology Resources
Last Updated: February 06, 2020
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Division of Renal Medicine Equipment
Last Updated: January 29, 2020
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Division of Renal Medicine Facilities and Resources
Last Updated: February 06, 2020
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Department of Pediatrics
Last Updated: October 22, 2020

The Emory Department of Pediatrics currently includes 248 faculty conducting research, 178 of whom are extramurally funded with 454 extramurally funded research projects (grants and contracts). Growth in extramural research funding for the department has been on a considerable trajectory. In 2005, the Department of Pediatrics had just 193 total faculty members and reported approximately $10 million in extramural funding. By the end of fiscal year 2020, the faculty members in the DOP topped out at 498 and research funding levels were at $111.8 million in total funding and $80 million in NIH funding, which allowed them to achieve a top 10 ranking (ranking #3) in the 2019 NIH rankings for Departments of Pediatrics. Of note, research grants in the Emory Department of Pediatrics are only a part of the overall research enterprise in child health at Emory. All child health related research funding at Emory University in FY19 was over $145.1M, which comprises over 21% of the Emory University funding portfolio.

The Emory Department of Pediatrics currently includes 248 faculty conducting research, 178 of whom are extramurally funded with 454 extramurally funded research projects (grants and contracts). Growth in extramural research funding for the department has bee...

Emory University Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1904, an adult, tertiary/quaternary care facility, Emory University Hospital (EUH) has 751 licensed beds, including 82 beds at EUH at Wesley Woods (see page 11). Staffed by 1,516 Emory faculty physicians, EUH includes 120 ICU beds and a Serious Communicable Diseases Unit where ongoing research, training, and preparedness for challenging infectious diseases continues since the first Ebola patients in the U.S. were treated there in 2014. Patients in fiscal year 2018: 24,138 inpatient admissions and 200,457 outpatient service visits. Staff employees: 4,142, plus 162 at EUH at Wesley Woods.

EUH is long known for services in transplantation, cardiology, cardiac surgery, oncology, neurology/neurosurgery, and orthopaedics. EUH is a “Magnet” hospital, a designation earned by only 6% of U.S. hospitals for nursing excellence from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. EUH has one of the highest case-mix indexes (a measure of complexity of illness treated) of any hospital in the country. In 2018 U.S. News & World Report again ranked EUH the No. 1 hospital in both metro Atlanta and Georgia.

emoryhealthcare.org/euh/index.html

Founded in 1904, an adult, tertiary/quaternary care facility, Emory University Hospital (EUH) has 751 licensed beds, including 82 beds at EUH at Wesley Woods (see page 11). Staffed by 1,516 Emory faculty physicians, EUH includes 120 ICU beds and a Serious Communicable Diseases Unit where ongo...

Emory University Hospital Midtown
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1908, a tertiary care facility, Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUH Midtown) has 529 licensed beds and is staffed by 1,428 Emory medical faculty, 388 private practice physicians, and 269 Kaiser Permanente physicians. EUH Midtown has 86 ICU beds, in addition to a level III neonatal intensive care unit with 48 beds. Patients in fiscal year 2018: 22,750 admissions (including 4,623 deliveries) and 273,790 outpatient service visits. Staff employees: 3,438.

EUH Midtown has a high case-mix index and is well known for services in cardiology, cardiac surgery, gastroenterology, neurosurgery, cancer, orthopaedics, and emergency medicine. Women’s services include prenatal and postnatal education, bone density testing, mammography, and obstetrics, with specialization in high-risk pregnancy.

emoryhealthcare.org/euhm/index.html

Founded in 1908, a tertiary care facility, Emory University Hospital Midtown (EUH Midtown) has 529 licensed beds and is staffed by 1,428 Emory medical faculty, 388 private practice physicians, and 269 Kaiser Permanente physicians. EUH Midtown has 86 ICU beds, in addition to a level III neonat...

Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 2007, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital has 120 licensed beds and seven ORs and is staffed by Emory faculty physicians. It has ranked in the top 10% of hospitals in the country for 11 years in patient satisfaction. It is a “Magnet” hospital, a designation earned by only 6% of U.S. hospitals for nursing excellence from the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Patients in fiscal year 2018: 3,062 admissions. Staff employees: 297.

emoryhealthcare.org/euosh/index.html 

Founded in 2007, Emory University Orthopaedics & Spine Hospital has 120 licensed beds and seven ORs and is staffed by Emory faculty physicians. It has ranked in the top 10% of hospitals in the country for 11 years in patient satisfaction. It is a “Magnet” hospital, a designati...

Emory Rehabilitation Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1976, Emory Rehabilitation Hospital (ERH) has 56 beds and is staffed by 86 Emory faculty physicians. ERH is part of a joint venture with Select Medical, which also includes 26 outpatient rehabilitation facilities and a day rehabilitation program. Specializing in stroke, ERH is one of the nation’s highest acuity rehab hospitals. Patients in fiscal year 2018: 1,021 admissions and 129,790 outpatient service visits. Emory Rehabilitation Joint Venture employees: 356.

emoryhealthcare.org/erh/index.html

Founded in 1976, Emory Rehabilitation Hospital (ERH) has 56 beds and is staffed by 86 Emory faculty physicians. ERH is part of a joint venture with Select Medical, which also includes 26 outpatient rehabilitation facilities and a day rehabilitation program. Specializing in stroke, ERH is one ...

Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1880, an acute care facility in the north metro area, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital (ESJH) has 410 beds. It has 522 Emory medical faculty physicians, 476 private practice physicians, 226 Kaiser Permanente physicians, and 15 Emory Specialty Associate physicians on its medical staff. Noted especially for cardiac care, ESJH provides training to physicians from around the world in robotic surgery for valve repair and is a primary location for cardiac rehabilitation. The hospital is noted also for cancer, neurologic, vascular, gastrointestinal, respiratory, and orthopaedic care and is ranked among the top 25 hospitals nationally for joint replacement by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services. ESJH has 66 ICU beds and is a “Magnet” hospital, recognized for its nursing excellence by the American Nurses Credentialing Center. Patients in 2018: 14,657 admissions and 123,524 outpatient service visits. Staff employees: 1,993. Community services include free health screenings and in-kind donations to local organizations supporting the homeless and indigent.

emoryhealthcare.org/esjh/index.html

Founded in 1880, an acute care facility in the north metro area, Emory Saint Joseph’s Hospital (ESJH) has 410 beds. It has 522 Emory medical faculty physicians, 476 private practice physicians, 226 Kaiser Permanente physicians, and 15 Emory Specialty Associate physicians on its medical ...

Emory Johns Creek Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 2007, Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) is a 110-bed acute care facility staffed by 371 Emory faculty, 410 private practice physicians, and 39 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. Services include emergency medicine, a women’s center with level III neonatal intensive care, adult intensive care, an infusion center, breast imaging with 3-D tomography, a certified bariatric center, advanced cardiac and stroke care, orthopedics, sleep medicine, wound care, urology, and a pain center. EJCH patients in 2018: 7,945 admissions (including 1,187 deliveries) and 81,591 outpatient service visits. Staff employees: 977. EJCH partners with churches, schools, police, fire, and other organizations to offer health and wellness screenings and educational events throughout the year.

emoryhealthcare.org/ejch/index.html

Founded in 2007, Emory Johns Creek Hospital (EJCH) is a 110-bed acute care facility staffed by 371 Emory faculty, 410 private practice physicians, and 39 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. Services include emergency medicine, a women’s center with level III neonatal intensive care, a...

Emory Decatur Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1961, Emory Decatur Hospital is a 451-bed facility staffed by 646 private practice and 126 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. Services include emergency medicine, cancer care, heart and vascular, stroke care, maternity care, orthopedics, alcohol and drug abuse, palliative care, podiatry, a weight loss center, and a medical fitness center. Staff employees: 2,898.

emoryhealthcare.org/locations/hospitals/emory-decatur-hospital/index.html

Founded in 1961, Emory Decatur Hospital is a 451-bed facility staffed by 646 private practice and 126 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. Services include emergency medicine, cancer care, heart and vascular, stroke care, maternity care, orthopedics, alcohol and drug abuse, palliative care, ...

Emory Hillandale Hospital
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 2005, Emory Hillandale Hospital has 100 beds and is staffed by 331 private practice and 67 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. In addition to emergency, infusion, breast care, and sleep medicine services, the hospital has specialty expertise in areas ranging from orthopedics and rehabilitation to cardiology, endocrinology, hematology, and diabetes and nutrition. Staff employees: 539.

emoryhealthcare.org/locations/hospitals/emory-hillandale-hospital/index.html

Founded in 2005, Emory Hillandale Hospital has 100 beds and is staffed by 331 private practice and 67 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. In addition to emergency, infusion, breast care, and sleep medicine services, the hospital has specialty expertise in areas ranging from orthopedics and ...

Emory Long-Term Acute Care
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1997, Emory Long-Term Acute Care is a 76-bed facility with 156 private practice and 42 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. The hospital specializes in pulmonary rehabilitation, including ventilator weaning, as well as general rehabilitation, physical therapy, and wound care. Staff employees: 156.

emoryhealthcare.org/locations/hospitals/emory-long-term-acute-care/index.html

Founded in 1997, Emory Long-Term Acute Care is a 76-bed facility with 156 private practice and 42 Emory Specialty Associate physicians. The hospital specializes in pulmonary rehabilitation, including ventilator weaning, as well as general rehabilitation, physical therapy, and wound care. Staf...

Emory University Hospital Smyrna
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1974, Emory University Hospital Smyrna, 88 beds, was recently acquired by Emory and is currently undergoing major renovation.

Founded in 1974, Emory University Hospital Smyrna, 88 beds, was recently acquired by Emory and is currently undergoing major renovation.

Emory Specialty Associates
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 2006, in addition to the Emory Clinic, Emory Healthcare provides outpatient care via Emory Specialty Associates (ESA), an Emory-owned physician practice organization with 87 locations in 12 Georgia counties. ESA has 205 non-faculty physicians; 57 nurse practitioners; and 61 physician assistants. Employees: 1,240.

Founded in 2006, in addition to the Emory Clinic, Emory Healthcare provides outpatient care via Emory Specialty Associates (ESA), an Emory-owned physician practice organization with 87 locations in 12 Georgia counties. ESA has 205 non-faculty physicians; 57 nurse practitioners; and 61 physici...

Emory Clinic
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 1953, the largest, most comprehensive group practice in Georgia, the Emory Clinic has 1,625 Emory faculty physicians, 375 nurse practitioners, and 308 physician assistants, with locations throughout the city and state. Nonphysician employees: 3,759. Patient service visits in fiscal year 2018: 3,904,099, including those for Emory Specialty Associates.

emoryhealthcare.org/emory-clinic/index.html

Founded in 1953, the largest, most comprehensive group practice in Georgia, the Emory Clinic has 1,625 Emory faculty physicians, 375 nurse practitioners, and 308 physician assistants, with locations throughout the city and state. Nonphysician employees: 3,759. Patient service visits in fiscal...

Emory Wesley Woods Campus
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Established in 1954, Emory Wesley Woods Campus includes the following locations:

  • Budd Terrace (John Pulliam, administrator), a 250-bed nursing care facility
  • Emory University Hospital at Wesley Woods, an 82-bed facility providing adult inpatient psychiatric care; 972 admissions in 2018; 162 staff employees
  • Wesley Woods Towers, managed by Wesley Woods Senior Living, with 158 residential retirement apartments, including 36 personal care apartments

Established in 1954, Emory Wesley Woods Campus includes the following locations:...

Emory Healthcare Network
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

Founded in 2011, Emory Healthcare Network is a clinically integrated network with nearly 2,800 Emory and private practice physicians, 250 locations, and 11 hospitals. It was formed to improve care coordination and quality outcomes as well as control costs for patients and the community. Network partners share common quality goals and are connected via the Emory Health Information Exchange. Network physicians practice in more than 70 specialties. The network also includes MinuteClinics as well as urgent care provider Peachtree Immediate Care.

emoryhealthcare.org/centers-programs/emory-healthcare-network/

Founded in 2011, Emory Healthcare Network is a clinically integrated network with nearly 2,800 Emory and private practice physicians, 250 locations, and 11 hospitals. It was formed to improve care coordination and quality outcomes as well as control costs for patients and the community. Netwo...

Woodruff Leadership Academy
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Founded in 2002, The Woodruff Leadership Academy was established to develop leadership potential in faculty and administration across the health sciences to create, articulate, and achieve organizational vision. It has 381 alumni.

whsc.emory.edu/wla

Founded in 2002, The Woodruff Leadership Academy was established to develop leadership potential in faculty and administration across the health sciences to create, articulate, and achieve organizational vision. It has 381 alumni....

Atlanta Veterans Affairs (VA) Medical Center Overview
Last Updated: January 31, 2020

Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 466 hospital beds, including 273 medical/surgical beds, 120 community living center beds, a 61-bed domiciliary, and 12 psychosocial residential rehabilitation beds. Annual patient totals: 8,361 admissions and 1,949,505 outpatient service visits. Staffed by 328 Emory physicians, providing the majority of patient care.

Atlanta Veterans Affairs Medical Center, 466 hospital beds, including 273 medical/surgical beds, 120 community living center beds, a 61-bed domiciliary, and 12 psychosocial residential rehabilitation beds. Annual patient totals: 8,361 admissions and 1,949,505 outpatient service visits. Staffe...

Grady Memorial Hospital
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Grady Memorial Hospital, 640 licensed beds. Annual patient service visits: 30,929 admissions and 639,169 outpatient service visits. Staffed by 774 Emory medical faculty. In addition, 368 Emory residents and fellows provide care at Grady under supervision of the faculty. Together, these Emory physicians provide about 80% of care at Grady, with the other 20% provided by Morehouse School of Medicine and Grady-employed physicians.

Grady Memorial Hospital, 640 licensed beds. Annual patient service visits: 30,929 admissions and 639,169 outpatient service visits. Staffed by 774 Emory medical faculty. In addition, 368 Emory residents and fellows provide care at Grady under supervision of the faculty. Together, these Emory ...

Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance (CTSA): Overview
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance (CTSA) is one of over 50 NIH-funded consortiums. The vision of the consortium is to train the next generation of clinical investigators, translate laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, and engage communities in clinical research efforts. The CTSA's goals are to improve national health by advancing the implementation and the efficiency and quality of translational research outcomes.

The Georgia CTSA involves a unique statewide collaboration between 4 cornerstone universities, Emory School of Medicine, Georgia Institute of Technology, Morehouse School of Medicine, and the University of Georgia. Emory is a national leader in health care and biomedical research as well as an outstanding leader in clinical and translational research training and education. Georgia Tech is a nationwide leader in biomedical engineering and the application of innovative systems engineering to health care solutions. Morehouse School of Medicine is a nationally recognized historically black institution that brings ethnic diversity to biomedical research, addresses health disparities through successful community engagement research, and serves as a pipeline for training minority researchers. UGA has a proven track record in outstanding laboratory, pharmaceutical, veterinary, educational and translational research and, as the State’s land-grant institution, offers a robust statewide network that enhances community outreach, service, and research. These institutions extend their current partnerships in healthcare, education, and cutting-edge interdisciplinary research to maximize the Georgia CTSA outcomes.

Beyond academia, the Georgia CTSA also has partnerships with multiple healthcare networks, biomedical entrepreneurs, life-science non-profits, professional societies and visionary health leaders. Synergistically, the organizations leverage their unique strengths to accelerate clinical and translational research, education, and community engagement to impact health in Georgia and beyond. The Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance is supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378. To learn more about the Georgia CTSA go to:  GeorgiaCTSA.org/

The Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance (CTSA) is one of over 50 NIH-funded consortiums. The vision of the consortium is to train the next generation of clinical investigators, tran...

Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance (CTSA): Informative Links
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

 

Georgia CTSA Location

Link

Home Page

Home Page

Submit A Request

Submit A Request

Email a Request

georgiactsa@emory.edu

Community Resources

Community Resources

Discovery Resources

Discovery Resources

Training Resources

Training Resources

Clinical Research

Clinical Research Spaces (GCRC's)

People of Georgia CTSA

People of Georgia CTSA

Searchable Database (ROCS)

Research Opportunities & Collaboration Support (ROCS)

 

 Supported by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378

 ...

Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance (CTSA): Clinical Sites
Last Updated: January 29, 2020

CLINICAL SITES (3 Tiers)

Tier 1: Hospital Based Clinical Research Sites

 

Tier 2: Medical Office Based Clinical Research

 

Tier 3: Community Based Clinical Research Sites

  • Emory Genetics Metabolic Nutrition Program
  • VA Community Based Outpatient Centers                                                                                                                                                                                                                 

    Community Health Centers that participate in MSM educational and research studies include the Southside Community Health Center, Grady East Point Neighborhood Clinic, and West End Medical Center, all providing community based primary care. In addition, Oakhurst Community Health Center also serves as the principal source of health care for two public housing communities.

     

    Pediatric Clinical Research Sites

 

CLINICAL SITES (3 Tiers)

Tier 1: Hospital Based Clinical Research Sites ...

Emory Integrated Core Facilities Overview
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) provide a number of facilities for use by all investigators in the state of Georgia.  Specific core services include cellular imaging and systems imaging, biostatistics and bioinformatics, electron microscopy, a personalized immunotherapy center, flow cytometry, genomics, proteomics, transgenic mouse and gene targeting, and rodent behavioral characterization.

http://www.cores.emory.edu/

The Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) provide a number of facilities for use by all investigators in the state of Georgia.  Specific core services include cellular imaging and systems imaging, biostatistics and bioinformat...

Biostatistics and Collaboration Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Biostatistics Collaboration Core (BCC) provides state-of-the-art statistical and bioinformatics analysis. Our mission is to collaborate with investigators to choose appropriate study design for quantitative analysis and to assure appropriate implementation of statistical methodology in research. BCC personnel are available for discussion at all stages of research, including: preparation of grants and contracts, database design and management; data mining and analysis of large, administrative datasets; bioinformatics needs; assistance in analyzing and presenting research data; and statistical review of manuscripts in the publication process. The BCC has access to a broad range of computer hardware and software and personnel with expertise in using major statistical, graphics, and data management packages.

The Biostatistics Collaboration Core (BCC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine with is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/bcc/

The Emory Biostatistics Collaboration Core (BCC) provides state-of-the-art statistical and bioinformatics analysis. Our mission is to collaborate with investigators to choose appropriate study design for quantitative analysis and to assure appropriate implementation of statistical methodology...

Center for System Imaging Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Center for Systems Imaging Core (CSIC) is a cross-disciplinary scientific, administrative, and educational home for imaging science at Emory University. The center is housed in a 17,000 square foot newly-renovated facility on the 2nd floor of the Wesley Woods Health Center Building.

The Center for System Imaging Core provides core services for human and animal imaging studies. The major imaging equipment housed at CSI includes a cyclotron/Radiochemistry lab, a 3T MRI system, a HRRT human brain PET system, an Inveon micro PET-CT system, and a multispectral fluorescence animal imaging system.

Additional information is available at: http://www.corelabs.emory.edu/csi/index.html

The Center for Systems Imaging Core (CSIC) is a cross-disciplinary scientific, administrative, and educational home for imaging science at Emory University. The center is housed in a 17,000 square foot newly-renovated facility on the 2nd floor of the Wesley Woods Health Center Building....

Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core
Last Updated: September 08, 2020

The Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core provides provides investigators with the tools and expertise needed to use rapidly evolving methods and technologies in the area of glycomics. 

TheEmory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core provides state-of-the-art molecular interaction assay technologies and using surface plasmon resonance with a BiaCore X100, isothermal titration calorimetry with a MicroCAiAuto-iTC200, and glycan microarray analyses using a variety of glycan microarrays comprised of various classes of glycans.

The Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR000454. 

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/ecgc/index.html

The Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core provides provides investigators with the tools and expertise needed to use rapidly evolving methods and technologies in the area of glycomics....

Emory Flow Cytometry Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC) is a full-service flow cytometry facility offering Emory researchers the ability to use the latest sorters and analyzers in their research.

The Emory University School of Medicine Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC) provides state-of-the-art high-speed sorting, sample analysis and analyzer training facilities. Mission priority #1 is to provide the highest customer satisfaction to our clients. This Flow Cytometry Core Facility provides quantitative flow cytometric analyses on samples from a wide variety of biological matrices, e.g. blood, bone marrow, spleen, serum, plasma, solid tissues, cell extracts, etc., to support both clinical and basic research efforts on the campus and the surrounding area.

The Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC) is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) and is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine. Additional support is provided by the National Center for Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/fcc/index.html

The Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC) is a full-service flow cytometry facility offering Emory researchers the ability to use the latest sorters and analyzers in their research....

Emory Integrated Computational Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) mission is to provide cutting-edge computational support to Emory researchers and users of users of other Emory Integrated Core Facilities. In effect, we act as the "digital hub" for all the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. 

The Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the National Center for Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378. 

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/eicc/index.html

The Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) mission is to provide cutting-edge computational support to Emory researchers and users of users of other Emory Integrated Core Facilities. In effect, we act as the "digital hub" for all the Emory Integrated Core Facilities.

Emory Integrated Genomics Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC) provides investigators with the tools and expertise needed to use the latest genomics technologies in their research.

The Emory Integrated Genomics Core’s (EIGC) central mission is to help Emory investigators effectively use state-of-the-art genomics platforms in pursuit of their research goals. Our primary platforms use next-generation sequencing technologies to characterize genomes in order to use these data as tools of discovery. Services include whole genome single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) genotyping, whole genome sequencing, structural variation detection, and 16S rDNA amplification and sequencing for microbiome studies. The EIGC also maintains CLIA certification, offering assay validation and nucleic acid extraction services from a wide variety of biological sources, including blood, serum, plasma, solid tissues, cell extracts, etc., to support both basic research and clinical efforts on campus. We can also help characterize and confirm the identify of cell lines, which is critical for scientific rigor and reproducibility.

The Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

*** For cancer-related research supported by the Winship Cancer Institute ONLY:

Partial support is provided by the Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC) Shared Resource of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and NIH/NCI under award number 2P30CA138292-04.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/eigc/index.html    

The Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC) provides investigators with the tools and expertise needed to use the latest genomics technologies in their research.

Emory Integrated Genomics Core - Facilities and Other Resources
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC)

 

Other:

EMORY INTEGRATED GENOMICS CORE (EIGC)

The Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), consists of three teams which provide unique services to Emory clinical and basic researchers. The central mission of the EIGC is to provide a top-tier genomics resource that is widely available to the Emory research community and that integrates cutting-edge genomics technologies with downstream analyses. The EIGC’s CLIA Team (CLIA: 11D1086150) provides nucleic acid isolation and QC services and cell line validation. The CLIA team provides support for clinical trials research using genomics technologies that need to be conducted in a CLIA certified environment with CLIA validated protocols. Aliquots of human samples isolated in the EIGC can also be transferred to other CLIA/CAP certified testing facilities for clinical diagnostic testing. The EIGC’s Research Team provides a wide variety of genomics services which include genotyping assays like the Infinium Methylation EPIC array and TaqMan Genotyping assays; library preparation for 16S rDNA microbiome, targeted sequencing (Fluidigm Access Array), single cell sequencing (10X Genomics and 1CellBio platforms), RNAseq, ATACseq, and reduced representation bisulfite sequencing; Illumina-based Next-Generation sequencing using the Illumina MiSeq and NextSeq platforms; structural variant characterization (Bionano Saphyr; and expression analysis (Nanostring nCounter). The EIGC has adopted an innovative business model whereby large-scale next-generation sequencing is outsourced to other academic and commercial entities, with the ultimate goal of obtaining the lowest cost, highest quality, and fastest turn-around for our customers. The EIGC’s Genome Engineering Team offers custom cloning services and cell line knock-in and knock-out genome editing services for Emory investigators in support of functional genomics applications.

The EIGC teams include four PhD-level scientists, providing expertise on genomics platforms, epigenetics services, cancer biology, CLIA protocol, custom cloning, genome editing, and other support. The lab is supported by 7 additional staff. The Core director (Dr. Lyra Griffiths) and Scientific directors (Drs. Michael Zwick and Christopher Scharer) provide project planning and grant application support. EIGC works closely with the Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) and the Biostatistics Shared Resource at Winship Cancer Institute in order to support our investigators with computational support.

The EIGC is located in a Clinical Laboratory Improvement Amendments (CLIA) certified laboratory located on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building, with 2400 square feet of dedicated wet-lab space. The EIGC’s laboratory areas include dedicated pre- and post-PCR spaces. Two chemical fume hoods and a biological safety cabinet are also located within the space. The EIGC is located adjacent to the EICC and common public meeting room space on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building, allowing for project planning meetings that span both cores and weekly EIGC team meetings.

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Genomics Core - Major Equipment
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC) Users

 

EMORY INTEGRATED GENOMICS CORE (EIGC)

The Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is a CLIA-certified (CLIA:11D1086150) laboratory located on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building, with 2400 square feet of dedicated wet-lab space. The EIGC’s laboratory areas include dedicated pre- and post-PCR spaces. Two chemical fume hoods are also located within the space. The EIGC has 500 square feet of dedicated office adjacent to the laboratory space on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building, which provides for computational services, meeting customers, and weekly EIGC team meetings. The EIGC is composed of three divisions: CLIA, Research, and Genome Engineering. Each division provides specialized genomics research services to Emory investigators. A Thermo Scientific Nautilus Laboratory Information Management System (LIMs) is hosted at Emory and all data is stored on-site in a HIPAA secure zone. This LIMS provides the foundation for EIGC workflows and fosters collaboration across the Emory campus and with external consortia. The EIGC closely coordinates with the Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC), which is located on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building adjacent to the EIGC, and the Biostatistics Shared Resource of the Winship Cancer Institute to provide computational and bioinformatics services for Emory investigators. The EIGC infrastructure includes:

DNA/RNA Extraction, Genotyping, and Gene Expression:

nanoString nCounter FLEX: A highly sensitive, enzyme-free, molecular counting platform for determining gene expression or target enrichment across a predefined panel of genomic regions. The EIGC assists investigators with project planning, sample preparation, and coordination of nCounter services across a number of outside providers.

Bionano Saphyr: An optical genome scanning device which scans NanoChannel arrays in order to image very long, single DNA molecules. These images make it possible to discover and characterize structural variation that is typically difficult to map using standard short read next-generation sequencing strategies.

10X Genomics Chromium Controller: An automated system that allows one to encapsulate samples into hundreds to tens of thousands of uniquely addressable partitions in minutes, each containing an identifying barcode for downstream analysis. Supports a wide variety of assays when combined with Illumina sequencing that include: Single Cell Gene Expression, Single Cell Immune Profiling, Single Cell Copy Number Variant Detection, Single Cell ATACseq, Genome sequencing, Exome sequencing, de novo Assembly of genomes.

1CellBio InDrop System: A single-cell, high-resolution transcriptomics analysis platform that provides enhanced experimental control, more actionable information and a lower overall cost per result compared to other existing platforms. Supports a wide variety of tissue types and applications to address questions that include cancer, immunobiology, and developmental biology. The platform has a high encapsulation rate (>90%) with low doublets with flexible reagents and protocols to support a wide variety of single cell assays.

Invitrogen Countess: A digital cell counter and viability instrument.

BioRad QX200 Droplet Digital PCR System: Droplet digital polymerase chain reaction was developed to provide precision quantification of nucleic acid target sequences. ddPCR measures absolute quantities of nucleic acid molecules encapsulated in discrete water-in-oil droplets by measuring the fluorescence generated by binding of gene-specific probes or EvaGreen double-stranded DNA binding dye within each droplet. ddPCR has the ability to detect gene copy number variation, detect rare sequences from tumor cells, measure gene expression levels, and to detect genome edits (HDR and NHEJ).

Fluidigm AccessArray: A liquid handling instrument that is primarily used for targeted enrichment of specified genomic regions for Illumina sequencing.

Two Magnetic Particle Processors: One Kingfisher Flex and one MagMax provide for automated extraction of RNA from FFPE tissue in 96-well format and DNA from FFPE tissue, fresh or frozen tissue, blood, blood products, saliva, urine, and cell cultures in 24-well or 96-well format.

Tecan EVO150: Used to perform pre-PCR routine liquid transfers, such as the transfer of nucleic acids from individual vials into the 96-well storage and amplification plates required by downstream applications.

Beckman Biomek NX Automation Workstation: Performs all post-PCR aspects of liquid handling including pipetting, dilution, dispensing, and integrations.

Beckman SPRI-TE robot: For hands-free preparation of up to 10 next generation sequencing libraries every 12 hours.

Tecan Infinite M200 Pro: Quantitates nucleic acids using either PicoGreen or RiboGreen fluorescence protocols.

Agilent Fragment Analyzer (48/96 wells): A is a parallel capillary electrophoresis instrument designed to speed nucleic acid fragment analysis and quality control before moving onto downstream applications.

Agilent 2100 Bioanalyzer: A lab on a chip platform allows for rapid quantification of nucleic and proteomic samples, while providing information about the size distribution of the fragments.

Agilent 2200 TapeStation: Provides simple, fast, and reliable electrophoresis of DNA, RNA, and proteins.

SageScience SageELF Size Selection Instrument: Separates DNA or protein samples by size and then fractionates the whole sample or a section of the sample into 12 fractions.

Eight Thermal Cyclers: Five Applied Biosystems 9700 Peltier-driven thermal cyclers, two MJ BioRad thermal cyclers, and one BioRad Tetrad with four 96-well gradient capable blocks.

Applied Biosystems 3130: A multi-color fluorescence-based DNA analysis system using the technology of capillary electrophoresis with 16 capillaries operating in parallel. This fully automated system separates amplified fragments of varying sizes for analysis of short tandem repeats (STRs) among individuals and extended pedigrees as well as sequencing.

Applied Biosystems 7900HT: Is a real-time quantitative PCR system that combines 96- and 384-well plate compatibility with fully automated robotic loading. Key applications include gene expression quantitation and the detection of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) using the fluorogenic 5' nuclease assay.

Covaris E220 Adaptive Focusing Instrument: Employs ultrasonic pulses to uniformly shear nucleic acids, in a multi-sample format with walk away operation. The instrument can also be used to automate lyses of difficult samples (like mouse tail), shear proteins, and form lipid vesicles.

Non-instrument computers: There are currently one MacPro tower, two MacBook Pros, two iMacs, three Dell Precision Workstations with 64-BIT OS, and five Dell PCs.

Next Generation Sequencing:

One Illumina MiSeq instrument: A fully integrated next generation sequencing platform capable of generating between 540 Mb (~4 hours) up to 8.5 Gb (~39 hours) of raw sequence. Some applications of this platform include targeted sequencing from complex eukaryotic genomes or cancer tumors, microbial whole-genome sequencing, 16S rRNA sequencing for microbiome studies, and sequencing of bisulfite treated DNA for assessing methylation. Samples preparation is rapid and samples can be multiplexed with sequence tags.

One Illumina NextSeq 550 instrument: A fully integrated next generation sequencing platform capable of generating between 16GB to 120GB in instrument runs that range between 11 to 29 hours per experiment. Some applications of this platform include sequencing RNAseq, ATACseq or single cell libraries, targeted sequencing from complex eukaryotic genomes or cancer tumors, microbial whole-genome sequencing, and sequencing of bisulfite treated DNA for assessing methylation. The NextSeq also has array scanning capabilities utilized to read Infinium microarrays, including the Infinium MethylationEPIC array.

Large-Scale Next Generation Sequencing: The EIGC has adopted an innovative business model whereby large-scale next-generation sequencing is outsourced to other academic and commercial entities, with the ultimate goal of obtaining the lowest cost, highest quality, and fastest turn-around for our customers. Academic partners include the Genomic Services Laboratory at HudsonAlpha and genomics core facilities at the University of Georgia, Georgia Institute of Technology, and New York University. Commercial companies include: Novogene, Omega Bioservices, Genewiz, Akesogen, Otogenetics, and BGI. We have the flexibility to pursue sequencing projects with any outside provider that provides competitive pricing, rapid turn-around time, and high-quality data. In effect, the EIGC acts as a sequencing service broker, whereby we compete companies against each other to obtain the best pricing and service for 

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Proteomics Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC) is a full-service proteomics facility offering Emory researchers the ability to use the latest technologies to identify and characterize proteins in their research.

The Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

*** For cancer-related research supported by the Winship Cancer Institute ONLY:
Partial support is provided by the Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC), Shared Resource of Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and NIH/NCI under award number 2P30CA138292-04.

*** For neuroscience-related research supported by the Emory Neuroscience NINDS Core Facilities ONLY:
Partial support is provided by the Emory Neuroscience NINDS Core Facilities and NIH/NINDS under award number P30NS055077.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/eipc/index.html

The Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC) is a full-service proteomics facility offering Emory researchers the ability to use the latest technologies to identify and characterize proteins in their research....

Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

The Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EILMC) Facility will provide quantitative lipidomics analyses on lipid samples from a wide variety of biological matrices, e.g. blood, serum, plasma, solid tissues, cell extracts, etc., to support both clinical and basic research efforts on campus. These analyses will provide insight on lipids and lipid precursors whose abundance can be monitored as biomarkers to predict and follow progression of a wide range of diseases. 

The Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EILMC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/eilc/index.html

The Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EILMC) Facility will provide quantitative lipidomics analyses on lipid samples from a wide variety of biological matrices, e.g. blood, serum, plasma, solid tissues, cell extracts, etc., to support both clinical and basic research efforts ...

Integrated Cellular Imaging Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICIC) provides state-of-the-art light microscopy and image analysis technology. We offer confocal and live cell imaging, multi-photon animal and tissue imaging, widefield with deconvolution, super resolution, and image analysis. To effectively implement these technologies, we provide consultations, expert training, and support for all our systems. Along with providing access to equipment, another goal of ICI is to serve as a nucleator for the cell imaging community at Emory. We want to unite diverse microscopy interests, allowing investigators to share ideas, expertise, and instrumentation. Developing new imaging techniques and acquiring new cutting-edge equipment are central to our mission.

*** For pediatrics-related research
Although this is officially an Emory Integrated facility operated out of the School of Medicine, there is a Pediatrics satellite located conveniently on the ground floor in HSRB. Moreover, child health researchers using equipment at any of the ICI locations receive a generous subsidy off regular pricing.

*** For cancer-related research supported by the Winship Cancer Institute ONLY
Partial support is provided by the Emory University Integrated Cellular Imaging Microscopy Core of the Winship Cancer Institute of Emory University and NIH/NCI under award number, 2P30CA138292-04. 

*** For neuroscience-related research supported by the Emory Neuroscience NINDs Core Facilities ONLY
Partial support is provided by the Emory University Integrated Cellular Imaging Microscopy Core of the Emory Neuroscience NINDS Core Facilities grant, 5P30NS055077. 

*** For pediatrics-related supported by Emory+Children's Pediatric Research Center ONLY
Partial support is provided by the Emory University Integrated Cellular Imaging Microscopy Core of the Emory+Children's Pediatric Research Center. 

*** For all other research
Partial support is provided by the Emory University Integrated Cellular Imaging Microscopy Core. 

*** For Lattice light sheet microscope research
Partial support is provided by PHS Grant UL1TR000454 from the Clinical and Translational Science Award Program, National Institutes of Health, National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences. 

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/ici/index.html 

 

The Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICIC) provides state-of-the-art light microscopy and image analysis technology. We offer confocal and live cell imaging, multi-photon animal and tissue imaging, widefield with deconvolution, super resolution, and image analysis. To effectively implement t...

Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF) provides state of the art equipment and expertise for generating and characterizing genetically altered mouse models. Our main technology platform uses CRISPR-CAS9. We also offer rederivation and cryopreservation services.

The Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/tmc/index.html

The Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF) provides state of the art equipment and expertise for generating and characterizing genetically altered mouse models. Our main technology platform uses CRISPR-CAS9. We also offer rederivation and cryopreservation services....

Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core (IEMC) at Emory University provides electron microscopy (EM) training and services to academic, clinical, and industry users. The IEMC is located at two sites on the Emory University. Cherry L. Emerson Hall site provides services and training that include traditional transmission electron microscopy and cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET). The newly established Biochemistry Connector site provides services and training in single particle cryo electron microscopy (Cryo-EM). Instrumentation at Emory includes a ThermoFisher Talos Arctica 200 kV Filed Emission TEM, a JEOL JEM- 2200FS 200 kV Field Emission TEM (equipped with hole-free phase-plate and a DE-20 direct electron detector), a ThermoFisher Talos 120 kV TEM, a JEOL JEM-1400 120 kV TEM, a Hitachi HT7700 120 kV TEM, and two Field Emission SEMs. Additional preparative equipment includes a ThermoFisher Vitrobot Mark IV, Gatan CP3, several plasma-cleaners and carbon evaporators, a Baltec HPM- 010 high-pressure freezer, a Leica cryo-ultramicrotome, and a Leica freeze substitution device. We have dedicated GPU and CPU clusters, and workstations for Cryo EM image processing and data storage.

The Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core (IEMC) at Emory University is subsidized by the School of Medicine and Emory College of Arts and Sciences. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under award number UL1TR000454.

Data can be gathered on the TALOS L 120C TEM, the TALOS Arctica 200kV TEM.

Data can be collected on the JEOL JEM-1400, 120kV TEM, supported by the National Institutes of Health Grant S10 RR025679.

Data can be collected on the JEOL JEM-2200FS 200kV TEM supported by the National Science Foundation Major Research Instrumentation Grant 0923395.

Data can be gathered on the Hitachi HT7700 120kV TEM supported by the Georgia Clinical and Translational Science Alliance under award number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/iemc/

The Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core (IEMC) at Emory University provides electron microscopy (EM) training and services to academic, clinical, and industry users. The IEMC is located at two sites on the Emory University. Cherry L. Emerson Hall site provides services and ...

Emory University Rodent Behavioral Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory University Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC) plans, executes, and analyzes behavioral experiments examining activity, arousal, coordinated movement, learning and memory, anxiety, depression, seizure susceptibility, reward/reinforcement, and aggression in mice and rats.

The Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Emory Neuroscience NINDS Core Facilities (P30NS055077). Further support was provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/rbc/index.html

The Emory University Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC) plans, executes, and analyzes behavioral experiments examining activity, arousal, coordinated movement, learning and memory, anxiety, depression, seizure susceptibility, reward/reinforcement, and aggression in mice and rats....

Emory Personalized Immunotherapy Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Personalized Immunotherapy Core is located within the premises of Emory University Hospital Blood Bank. The core is a 300 ft2 clinical-grade, fully equipped, high sterility isolation facility. It is designed as an enabling infrastructure to support early phase clinical trials of cell-based therapies where processing of human cell and tissue is required as part of a FDA-sponsored biopharmaceutical study. It is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) for more than minimally manipulated cellular therapy products. The facility is manned by a team of highly qualified personnel dedicated to the successful implementation and prosecution of cellular therapy clinical trials. The purpose of this designated Core facility is to directly support investigator-driven phase I/II cell therapy clinical trials at Emory. As a Core facility, EPIC provides a unique resource to the Emory community in assisting the translation of cellular therapies from the bench side to the clinic. The facility possesses the necessary infrastructure to manufacture cellular therapies under FDA approved good manufacturing practices (FDA cGMP Phase I guidance July 2008). This facility was designed to be nimble and adaptable and can support the manufacturing needs of most small enabling cell therapy clinical trials.

The Emory Personalized Immunotherapy Core (EPIC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the National Center for Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/epic/index.html

The Emory Personalized Immunotherapy Core is located within the premises of Emory University Hospital Blood Bank. The core is a 300 ft2 clinical-grade, fully equipped, high sterility isolation facility. It is designed as an enabling infrastructure to support early phase clinical trials of cel...

Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC) help investigators use the latest multiplexed immunoassays in their research. We perform, analyze, and interpret multiplexed immunoassays to measure protein levels in biological matrices (plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, milk, urine, stool, vaginal swabs, tissues, etc.) on the Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) platform.

The Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the National Center for Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/emic/index.html

The Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC) help investigators use the latest multiplexed immunoassays in their research. We perform, analyze, and interpret multiplexed immunoassays to measure protein levels in biological matrices (plasma, serum, cerebrospinal fluid, milk, urine, stool, vag...

Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC) is the newest member of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. This cutting-edge core facility offers investigators the opportunity to experimentally manipulate the microbiomes of mice in a controlled environment to gain insight into important biological mechanisms. The EGAC contains a number of 3’ foot wide rigid isolators (Parkbio), each with the capacity to house 16 mice cages each. In addition, the facility has a Tecniplast ISOcageP Bioexclusion system. These are airtight individual mouse cages with high positive pressure that are specifically designed for cage-scale germ-free, gnotobiotic, and bioexclusion studies.

The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/egac/index.html

The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC) is the newest member of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. This cutting-edge core facility offers investigators the opportunity to experimentally manipulate the microbiomes of mice in a controlled environment to gain insight into important biologica...

Emory Stem Cell Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC) is one of the newest members of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF). The ESCC brings a powerful new research platform in support of Emory investigators. This core’s focus and technical expertise will be to derive and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from terminally differentiated somatic cells using non-integrating methods. Additionally, the core will provide training and educational resources to support investigators with interest in human stem cells. IPSCs generated from patients with a genetic defect allows for a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms of disease in an in vitro model. Other applications for these cells include developing a reporter line, drug screening and discovery, and potentially regenerative therapies. The core plans to interface with other members of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities as a pipeline to analyze patient cells that will inform drug discovery and personalized medicine.

The Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC) is subsidized by the Emory University School of Medicine and is one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities. Additional support is provided by the National Center for Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/escc/index.html

The Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC) is one of the newest members of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF). The ESCC brings a powerful new research platform in support of Emory investigators. This core’s focus and technical expertise will be to derive and characterize human induced plu...

Investigative Drug Services Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Investigative Drug Services Core (IDS) provides investigational drug services to the Winship Cancer Institute in Building C, the Emory Clinic, Buildings A and B, Executive Park, Emory Genetics and the Emory Children's Center.  IDS has two satellite locations at Emory Hospital and The Hope Clinic of Emory University.  The hospital satellite provides services to Emory University Hospitals, the Transplant Clinic and Woodruff Memorial Building.  The Hope Clinic satellite provides pharmacy services to the Hope Clinic, the clinical arm of the Emory Vaccine Research Center (EVC) and a Clinical Core for the Emory Center for AIDS Research (CFAR).

Additional information is available at: https://www.cores.emory.edu/ids/index.html

The Investigative Drug Services Core (IDS) provides investigational drug services to the Winship Cancer Institute in Building C, the Emory Clinic, Buildings A and B, Executive Park, Emory Genetics and the Emory Children's Center.  IDS has two satellite locations at Emory Hospital and The...

Emory High Performance Liquid Chromatography Bioanalytical Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Emory High Performance Liquid Chromatography Bioanalytical Core (HPLC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) measures monoamine neurotransmitters, amino acids neurotransmitters and purines using HPLC methods to support research efforts within and outside of Emory.

The Emory HPLC Bioanalytical Core (EHBC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is supported by the Department of Pharmacology, Emory University School of Medicine and the Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance of the National Institutes of Health under Award Number UL1TR002378.

Additional information is available at: http://www.cores.emory.edu/hplc/index.html

The Emory High Performance Liquid Chromatography Bioanalytical Core (HPLC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) measures monoamine neurotransmitters, amino acids neurotransmitters and purines using HPLC methods to support research efforts within and outside of Emory....

Translational Neuroscience Core
Last Updated: February 11, 2020

The Translational Neuroscience Core (TNC) is available for users in the community (Emory, Yerkes, GA Tech, Morehouse, GSU), as well as external users (from academia and industry). The TNC surgical team is unique in performing highly specialized procedures in the brain, spinal cord, and peripheral nerves. These procedures are often necessary to advance preclinical research in the fields of Gene and Stem Cell Therapy, Nerve Repair, Neuromodulation, Chronic Pain, etc. The TNC also assists in building and executing training programs for surgeons (a mandatory FDA requirement prior to clinical application of new techniques and surgical procedures).

Additional information is available at: https://www.cores.emory.edu/tnc/index.html

The Translational Neuroscience Core (TNC) is available for users in the community (Emory, Yerkes, GA Tech, Morehouse, GSU), as well as external users (from academia and industry). The TNC surgical team is unique in performing highly specialized procedures in the brain, spinal cord, and periph...

Libraries and Information Technology Services
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Libraries and Information Technology Services (LITS) is Emory University’s central Information Technology department, supporting all missions of research, healthcare, education, and administration.  LITS consists of over 600 professional information technology employees and manages all technical infrastructure (networking, data centers, service centers, etc.), information security infrastructure, enterprise-wide applications, healthcare delivery systems, and enterprise research platforms.

  • Research IT Environment: Emory University operates a high-speed, research information technology infrastructure to support the research mission of the University.  With a high speed ten gigabyte fiber as its backbone, the network provides speeds of up to a gigabyte to the desktop and ten gigabytes throughout the internal campus with several points of redundancy through to the commodity Internet and Internet 2.  Physical servers and hardware are stored in a 24x7 monitored professional data center with environmental and physical controls in place.  The University hosts virtual server farm and petabytes of storage that can quickly be provisioned based on investigator needs.  From a security perspective, Emory University adopts a defense-in-depth strategy incorporating security and privacy controls at a policy, operating system, network device, and intrusion prevention systems.  The University has HIPAA compliant network zones and infrastructure in place and implements encryption mechanisms to secure sensitive data at rest and in transit. 
  • Research Data Systems and Applications:  Data systems and applications used for research purposes can be hosted and administered on Emory LITS servers, either physically or through Virtual Machine environments.  Emory LITS implements best practices in application management and support, such as maintaining application, database and web interface components on separate servers, establishing backup / fail over server redundancy for service continuity and system and data recovery, and maintaining distinct development, test and production environments for efficient application testing, upgrade and deployment.  Access to systems in the Emory network zone is supported by secure two-factor authentication VPN connection and remote access tools, and by state-of-the-art technology for identity management, authentication, and account credentials encryption.  Role-based permission controls ensure that users have appropriate access to the designated functions and data records in applications and underlying databases, including row-level partitioning whenever deemed necessary. Emory LITS applies regular functionality and security software, hardware and operating system patching and upgrades, according to policies and program-specific service-level agreements.  Research applications that make use of patient health information are not directly connected to the electronic medical record system.  Instead, applications may draw on data extracted from the Emory clinical data warehouse read-only environment maintained by Emory Healthcare Information Systems, or on data abstracted from data instruments and entered in research applications and databases maintained by LITS, such as the Redcap data capture system, and program-specific data repositories. 

Libraries and Information Technology Services (LITS) is Emory University’s central Information Technology department, supporting all missions of research, healthcare, education, and administration.  LITS consists of over 600 professional i...

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta
Last Updated: May 27, 2020

Children’s is a national leader in inpatient days, admissions, surgical admissions and emergency department visits. In 2018, Children’s managed more than 1,160,186 patient visits, 430,868 patients from all 159 counties in Georgia, 27,074 hospital admissions, 43,333 surgical procedures (inpatient and outpatient) and 243,709 emergency department visits with Emory clinicians providing the majority of the care. 

Children’s consists of 3 pediatric hospitals, the Center for Advanced Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center and 20 neighborhood locations including 8 urgent care centers. Patients have access to over 2,100 pediatric physicians and allied health practitioners representing more than 60 pediatric specialties and programs. Children's also includes 13 telemedicine presenting sites around Georgia. There are more than 11,500 employees and 10,000 hospital and event volunteers. The three hospitals are:

  • Egleston, 330 beds (Emory campus). Annual patient totals: 11,532 admissions and 363,389 outpatient service visits. Staffed by Emory faculty physicians, with Emory clinicians providing 95% of care. 
  • Hughes Spalding, 24 beds (Grady Hospital campus). Annual patient totals: 941 admissions and 97,272 outpatient service visits. Staffed by Emory physicians and by private practice and Morehouse School of Medicine physicians, with Emory clinicians providing 75% of care. 
  • Scottish Rite, 319 beds (north Atlanta). Annual patient totals: 14,345 admissions and 377,027 outpatient service visits; all Emory pediatric physician faculty have admitting privileges here.  

Children’s is one of the largest pediatric clinical care systems in the country, the largest Medicaid provider in Georgia (serving 8 out of 10 pediatric inpatient Medicaid cases in Atlanta and 4 out of 10 statewide), and is consistently ranked among the top pediatric hospital systems in the country (e.g., by U.S. News & World Report). Children’s was formed in 1998 when Egleston Children’s Healthcare System and Scottish Rite Medical Center joined to form a unified healthcare system. In February 2006, Hughes Spalding Children’s Hospital joined the healthcare system. Children’s is a not-for-profit corporation. A complete array of pediatric subspecialties is available through pediatric physicians affiliated with Children’s, including allergy/immunology, cardiology, cardiothoracic surgery, critical care, orthopedics, otolaryngology, hematology/oncology, neurology, neurosurgery, gastroenterology, neonatology, transplant medicine, infectious diseases, psychiatry, and other specialties.

Children’s is home to the only two Magnet®-designated pediatric organizations in Georgia. In November 2018 and February 2019 respectively, the Egleston and Scottish Rite hospitals of Children’s received initial Magnet® designation by the American Nurses Credentialing Center (ANCC), being recognized for superior nursing standards in the delivery of quality patient care, leading to the highest levels of patient safety, quality and patient satisfaction.

The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta and Emory University relationship facilitates leading-edge pediatric research, training and innovation to deliver unique care and the best outcomes possible for patients and families. Emory’s Department of Pediatrics ranks third in the nation in NIH funding. In 2019, we achieved grants from NIH totaling $45.8M, a new Children’s record for NIH funding, and an increase of more than $10M from 2018. Total extramural funding equaled $72.8M. The Emory Department of Pediatrics (DOP) ranked in the top 5 in NIH funding for the third year in a row. Our investigators continued to advance groundbreaking work, with multiple publications in high profile scientific journals. We now average over 750 publications annually. These investments in research are directly resulting in improvements in clinical care, and we currently have over 1,000 patients enrolled in clinical trials. In addition to these accomplishments, a strong and detailed plan to align Children’s clinical focus areas with key transformational research opportunities was developed in early 2019, and shared with our partners at Emory and Georgia Tech.

 

Children’s is a national leader in inpatient days, admissions, surgical admissions and emergency department visits. In 2018, Children’s managed more than 1,160,186 patient visits, 430,868 patients from all 1...

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta: Investigational Drug Service (IDS) Pharmacy
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Investigational Drug Service (IDS) Pharmacy is a joint venture of the Children’s Department of Pharmacy and the Department of Clinical Research. The IDS pharmacy manages the investigational medications for over 140 clinical trials conducted on the various campuses in the Children’s system. The IDS pharmacy is staffed by two full time pharmacists and one full time pharmacy technician/assistant. The hours of operation are 8:00 am - 4:30 pm, Monday-Friday. The services and staff of the main hospital pharmacies are utilized to support trials requiring off-hours support. Various services provided by the IDS pharmacy include protocol review, budget preparation, staff education, receipt of study medications, IWRS system documentation, inventory maintenance, dose preparation, medication dispensing, subject randomization, subject and family education, invoice preparation and billing, periodic meetings with study monitors, final disposition of study medications, preparation and shipping of study medications, transfer of study medications among the various campuses, and compounding services (see below a detailed list of services provided by the IDS pharmacy).

Services provided by the Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Investigational Drug Service (IDS) Pharmacy
Study Initiation Review protocol Prepare budget Receive and process initial shipment of study drug Prepare study fact sheet for staff  In-service staff (as needed) Work with pharmacy IT staff to create drug build in Epic Prepare preprinted labels (as needed)
Study Maintenance Maintain appropriate inventory storage Maintain study records Meet with study monitors Order and receive inventory Process expired inventory Process patient returns Store patient returns for monitor Process drugs for onsite destruction Periodic study billing
Study Closeout Process study drug for return to sponsor / onsite destruction Process study records to archive Meet with study monitor for closeout visit Final billing
Dose Preparation Retrieve and sign out inventory Calculate dose/volume (as needed) Order entry / verification in computer Prepare dose Dose labeling
Prescription Dispensing Retrieve and sign out inventory Order entry into computer Prepare prescription Prescription labeling Patient/family education  IVRS documentation (when required) Prepare for shipping (as needed)

The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Investigational Drug Service (IDS) Pharmacy is a joint venture of the Children’s Department of Pharmacy and the Department of Clinical Research. The IDS pharmacy manages the investigational medications for over 140 clinical trials conducted on ...

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta: Center for Advanced Pediatrics (CAP)
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

The Center for Advanced Pediatrics (CAP) at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (Children's) is a 260,000 square foot outpatient clinic facility that utilizes a multidisciplinary, coordinated care approach to provide treatment to children and teens with chronic diseases and complex care needs by enabling access to multiple specialized health services in one place. Servicing thousands of families across Georgia, the center brings together over 20 pediatric specialties under one roof, harnessing the expertise and skills of more than 450 physicians and staff. The center’s multidisciplinary framework merges both clinical and research services to provide patients with optimal treatment options and state of the art care. Children’s is one of the largest pediatric healthcare organizations in the United States, and CAP is the first building of its kind for pediatrics in Georgia, conducting state of the art research and providing more than 100,000 patient visits per year.

CAP’s pediatric specialists provide treatment to a significant number of children with medically complex conditions who require multidisciplinary, coordinated care to optimize their outcomes. Providing “patient-centered” care, the center allows access to specialized programs and services, improved appointment availability, and a “child-friendly” design and setup. Space for collaborative physician consultations, central locations between all three hospital campuses, and specialized exam rooms for medically complex patients help to enhance and facilitate coordinated care and physician workflow. Phlebotomy, x-ray and lab services are strategically located in the CAP building to further promote efficient, timely and seamless care delivery. The center’s comprehensive health delivery model facilitates care integration, enhances care delivery, and improves clinical trial capabilities.

Providing patients access to leading-edge clinical research opportunities is another specialized feature that enhances the center’s multidisciplinary and coordinated care environment. The CAP houses resources essential to conducting rigorous research including investigational drug services, a Children’s-run Clinical Research Laboratory, an Emory-run processing lab, and courier services to transport samples according to established protocol between facilities and campuses. CAP also serves as home to the Pediatric Clinical Research Unit (PCRU), which provides over 4,000 square feet of clinical research space and infrastructure for pediatric researchers to conduct innovative research. Researchers at CAP are involved in more than 600 active research studies to improve child health. Studies span 28 specialty areas, with an emphasis in cancer and blood disorders, concussion, heart disease, kidney disease, liver disease, neurosciences, orthopaedics and cystic fibrosis.

The Center for Advanced Pediatrics (CAP) at Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (Children's) is a 260,000 square foot outpatient clinic facility that utilizes a multidisciplinary, coordinated care approach to provide treatment to children and teens with chronic diseases and complex care ne...

Emory Health Sciences Research Building (HSRB)
Last Updated: May 13, 2020

The Health Sciences Research Building (HSRB) opened its doors in April 2013. This state-of-the-art research space is located directly adjacent to the Emory-Children’s Center and connected via a two-story bridge. This four-story building includes 190,000 GSF, with over half the space (115,000 GSF) dedicated to research within the Emory Department of Pediatrics. An open lab concept features natural light in labs and corridors. The building features a 160-seat auditorium and a cafe dining area with an outdoor seating option. The building houses 500 people, including 74 faculty researchers and their teams of postdoctoral fellows, graduate students, and staff.

The building includes biosafety level 2 and 3 labs. The BSL-3 Laboratory is located on the 4th floor. This specialized facility is a total of 425 ft2 of shared BSL3 laboratory space. The BSL3 laboratory consists of 6 separate rooms including a doffing and donning area with included shower and sink, PPE storage, common storage including a flammable cabinet and autoclave, and two designated work suits of 100 sq ft each (E-499-A/B) which house the needed equipment. The dedicated equipment for this space is two -80C freezers, centrifuges, water bath, scopes, a pass through autoclave, flammable cabinets, and a dedicated computer.

Research in HSRB is designed to facilitate multidisciplinary child health research collaborations with space dedicated to drug discovery, immunology and vaccines, neurosciences, cancer, gastroenterology, transplant immunology, nephrology, biomedical engineering, and human genetics. The two-story working bridge that connects HSRB to ECC houses researchers dedicated to informatics, outcomes research, public health research, and clinical research.

HSRB Animal Space
An IACUC-approved 13,944 square foot animal vivarium is located in the basement of the HSRB Building. This animal facility is designed on a single corridor concept and contains rodents and fish with the intent to maintain rodents at a higher health standard than the convention for the campus (i.e. free of Murine Norovirus, Mouse Parvovirus, Helicobacter species, and fur mites enzootic to varying degrees in Emory mouse colonies). It includes microisolator ventilated cages for housing mice, surgical, and procedure rooms. This is Emory University’s first virus antibody free (VAF) animal facility. Under this new and elevated level of animal health maintenance there are special training, access, and traffic control measures. A gnotobiotic facility is being established in a portion of the HSRB vivarium and currently houses 6 isolator units.

Veterinarians and care staff are available for consultation on routine and special procedures, and on call after work hours and on holidays. Investigators using rodents of a lesser health status use the ECC animal research facility immediately across the street and accessible by bridge.

The Health Sciences Research Building (HSRB) opened its doors in April 2013. This state-of-the-art research space is located directly adjacent to the Emory-Children’s Center and connected via a two-story bridge. T...

Emory-Children's Center (ECC)
Last Updated: May 13, 2020

Emory-Children’s Center (ECC) was constructed in 2004 and is designed for optimal performance of modern biomedical research. This facility is a five-story building that includes 64,500 square feet of research space, an active pediatric subspecialty clinic on floor one staffed by Emory faculty physicians and operated by Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta, and a 12,500 square foot small animal vivarium in the basement. The ECC building is occupied by the Emory Department of Pediatrics with first floor clinic space leased to Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta. Department of Pediatrics faculty are actively involved with pediatric clinical care, teaching, research and child advocacy efforts throughout the building and the physicians and staff of Emory-Children’s Center are developing critical research programs across a variety of child health-related areas. The ECC building is physically connected to the Health Sciences Research Building via a functional two-story bridge.

BSL-2E Laboratory, 5th Floor

This specialized facility is a total of 498 sq ft of dedicated laboratory space. It has directional airflow and is HEPA filtered but not to BSL-3 standards. It also includes self closing doors, hands free sinks and a 75 sq ft anteroom for donning/doffing PPE. The dedicated lab procedure room space is equipped with the following:

                5 x Class 2 A2 Biosafety cabinets

                6 x CO2 incubators

                1 x -80C freezer

                1 x -20/4C freezer/fridge combo

                1 x 90K optima Beckman ultra centrifuge

                1 x Allegra X14R Beckman table top centrifuge

                1 x pass through autoclave

                1 x 18ohm water (RO tank system that feeds into a MilliQ system)

 

 ECC Animal Space

An IACUC-approved 12,500 square foot small animal vivarium is located in the basement of the ECC building. Housing is available for rodents and Xenopus. The facility is managed by professional staff of the Emory Division of Animal Research (DAR). Veterinary services with DAR include vendor surveillance, quarantine and isolation, preventive medicine, daily observation, treatment and intervention for injury or illness, health evaluations of sentinel animals, necropsy, histopathology, parasitology, microbiology, serology, hematology and blood chemistries. Veterinarians and care staff are available for consultation on routine and special procedures, and are on-call after work hours and on holidays. Investigators using rodents of higher health standard than the convention for the campus use the HSRB animal research facility immediately across the street and accessible by bridge.

Emory-Children’s Center (ECC) was constructed in 2004 and is designed for optimal performance of modern biomedical research. This facility is a five-story building t...

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta: Pediatric Clinical Research Unit (PCRU)
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

The Pediatric Clinical Research Unit (PCRU) provides the space and infrastructure for pediatric researchers to conduct innovative research to treat childhood illnesses and injuries, giving children and their families an opportunity to take part in leading-edge clinical trials.

Located on the fifth floor of the Center for Advanced Pediatrics (CAP), the PCRU provides 4,237 square feet of clinical research space. The outpatient clinical research unit includes six private rooms; three with beds, one with an exam table and two with infusion chairs. All have the capacity for full cardiorespiratory and vital sign monitoring. There is also an observation room with two chairs and an intake room equipped with a stadiometer, infant through adolescent scales and vital signs equipment. There is a nurse’s office and an open work station with ten computers available for coordinator and investigator use along with a registration area. Additionally, there is a large supply storage area, family nourishment room, soiled utility room, large medical records space and small conference room. Within CAP, there is also a café, beautiful outdoor gardens, and wireless internet access. 

The PCRU at CAP offers access to many of Children’s clinical services and departments, including radiology, EKGs, and a clinical laboratory for research only resulting and research lab processing. 

A dedicated and fully equipped Investigational Drug Services (IDS) office covers 672 square feet within the PCRU and is staffed by a research pharmacist and pharmacy tech. The IDS includes an anteroom and a hazardous medical prep room as well as ample storage for current and future trials. 

The PCRU staffs trained research nurses to perform medication administration, intravenous access and port access, vital signs monitoring and assessment, phlebotomy and other timed specimen collections including Pharmacokinetics Studies (PK) studies and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT).

The Pediatric Clinical Research Unit (PCRU) provides the space and infrastructure for pediatric researchers to conduct innovative research to treat childhood illnesses and injuries, giving children and their families an opportunity to take part in leading-edge clinical trials....

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta: Research Lab Processing
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

Center for Advanced Pediatrics (CAP)

Labs can be processed for shipping in the Research Core lab located on the first floor of CAP. Also in CAP is a CLIA-certified, clinical lab capable of on-site resulting from a specified test menu. For clinical labs not offered on-site, there is an established process to courier specimens to Egleston's Main Lab for processing results. Additionally, core laboratory services are offered at both the Egleston and Scottish Rite campuses of Children’s and include sample processing and aliquoting, short-and long-term sample storage in ultra-cold freezers, and IATA certified shipping.

Scottish Rite

Lab resources at Scottish Rite include a research coordinator desk, a sample bench processing and aliquoting area for use by Children's research laboratory staff and trained study staff members, general and refrigerated centrifuges and microcentrifuges and 1 [-80oC], 1 [-20oC] and 1 [4oC] freezer for sample storage. All freezers/refrigerators are equipped with 24-7 iSensix temperature monitoring alarm systems.

Egleston

Lab resources at Egleston include a research coordinator office, a sample bench processing and aliquoting area for use by Children's research laboratory staff and trained study staff members, general and refrigerated centrifuges and microcentrifuges and 1 [-80oC], 1 [-20oC] and 1 [4oC] freezer for sample storage. All freezers/refrigerators are equipped with 24-7 iSensix temperature monitoring alarm systems. Investigational Pharmacy Services provided include pharmacy expertise for researcher protocol planning, set-up, and initiation; ordering and maintenance of investigational drug inventory per sponsor, state, and federal requirements; preparation of investigational drug information fact sheets for pharmacy and nursing staff to fit researcher protocol needs; and compounding and dispensing investigational medications per protocol requirements.

Center for Advanced Pediatrics (CAP)...

Emory-Children’s Center: Research Unit (ECC-RU)
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

The Emory-Children’s Center Research Unit (ECC-RU) is a 984 square foot unit located on the first floor of the Emory-Children’s Center. The Emory University space managed by the Department of Pediatrics is dedicated to clinical research activities and is available for IRB-approved protocols conducted by Emory or its academic partners. The unit contains a research staff workroom, four exam rooms, two interview rooms, and a storage room. Phlebotomy services are also offered. The ECC-RU is self-service and appointments may be booked in a dedicated on-line scheduling system at which time the study staff will gain access for the informed consent process and subsequent study participant interactions.

The Emory-Children’s Center Research Unit (ECC-RU) is a 984 square foot unit located on the first floor of the Emory-Children’s Center. The Emory University space managed by the Department of Pediatrics is dedicated to clinical research activities and is available...

Children's Healthcare of Atlanta: Egleston Research Space
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

Satellite research space at Egleston hospital provides space for research study visits that include services not offered at CAP such as MRI, CT, and the Cardiovascular Imaging Research Core. The fully equipped two-bed patient area is located on Egleston’ s ground floor in the sleep lab area and is staffed by Pediatric Clinical Research Unit (PCRU) team members. Use of this space for visits not offering services in CAP also includes access to all Children’s clinical services and departments including but not limited to radiology, cardiology, vascular access teams, sedation services, and Canines for Kids pet therapy. Additionally, participants enjoy access to family-centered amenities including wireless internet, an exercise area, sleep rooms, and a business center, family library, cafeteria, and coffee shop.

Satellite research space at Egleston hospital provides space for research study visits that include services not offered at CAP such as MRI, CT, and the Cardiovascular Imaging Research Core. The fully equipped two-bed patient area is located on Egleston’ s ground floor in the sleep lab ...

Pediatric Research Alliance Centers
Last Updated: February 07, 2020

The Pediatric Research Alliance Centers were launched in 2007 via an initial $430M endowment from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (Children’s) to enhance the research infrastructure towards supporting and facilitating child health research in the Atlanta area. This effort has been extremely successful in bringing together multidisciplinary groups from multiple institutions to collaborate on research topics important to child health. It is now jointly sponsored via a financial investment from Children’s, the Emory University Woodruff Health Sciences Center and Georgia Institute of Technology (GA Tech) resulting in a unique collaboration between a children’s hospital, an academic medical center and a state university. The collective Children’s-Emory-GA Tech initiative has resulted in robust research centers that offer a thematic home for basic, translational and clinical investigators to interact and collaborate. 

Pediatric Research Centers:

  • Aflac Cancer and Blood Disorders Center
  • Center for Childhood Infections and Vaccines (CCIV)
  • Center for Transplantation and Immune-mediated Disorders (CTID)
  • Center for Cystic Fibrosis and Airways Disease Research (CF-AIR)
  • Children's Center for Pediatric Cellular Therapies (CPCT)
  • Center for Clinical Outcomes Research and Public Health (CORPH)
  • Center for Drug Discovery (CDD)
  • Marcus Autism Center
  • Children’s Center for Neurosciences Research (CCNR)
  • Center for Clinical and Translational Research (CCTR)
  • Children’s Heart Research and Outcomes Center (HeRO)
  • Pediatric Technology Center (PTC) at Georgia Tech 

Each center’s activities are supported through an NIH-funded leader, primary faculty membership, and a wide array of collaborators from Children’s, Emory, Morehouse School of Medicine, Georgia Institute of Technology and other area institutions.

The Pediatric Research Alliance Centers were launched in 2007 via an initial $430M endowment from Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta (Children’s) to enhance the research infrastructure towards supporting and facilitating child health research...

Pediatric Core Resources
Last Updated: May 13, 2020

The following Pediatric Research Alliance supported cores are designed specifically for child health researchers and are made readily available to pediatric researchers at a significantly reduced or fully subsidized cost offering access to instruments, technologies, services, and expert consultation to biomedical and behavioral investigators:

The Pediatric-Winship Flow Cytometry Core is located in 640 sq ft of dedicated space on the 3rd floor of the Health Sciences Research Building (E362) that is linked by a bridge to the Emory Children’s Center and in 200 sq ft in the Winship Cancer Institute (C5027). The core consists of two dedicated cell sorter rooms capable of BSL2(+) level sorting and wet lab space housing the analysis instruments. The laboratories have ample bench space for sample handling and small equipment. Scheduling of instruments, training, and billing are performed on PPMS, a campus-wide core management software package. The core has a full-time technical director providing education, analysis, and cell sorting services and another 2.5 FTE providing immunology core services, cell sorting, experimental design, and clinical specimen processing. Analysis can be performed on five analyzers: a BD FACSymphony A5 [6UV 7V 5B 6GY 3R] and an identically configured A3, two 4 laser Cytek Auoras [405nm, 488nm, 561nm, & 640nm], and a BC Cytoflex S [4V 2B 4YG 3R].

Cell sorting can be performed on a SORP FACSAria II cell sorter [3UV 5V 2B 5YG 3R] or a Sony SH800 (405nm, 488nm, 561nm and 640nm) with 6 fluorescent detectors. An Amnis ImageStreamX MkII cytometer also with 4 lasers (405nm, 488nm 561nm, & 642nm; 10 fluorescent channels) provides the capability for image cytometry. Analysis workstations are available for off line data analysis with multiple software packages including FACSDiva, FlowJo, FCSExpress, SpectroFlo, CytExpert and IDEAS.  Cytometry informatics packages are available in R or MATLAB. Data storage is available through campus-wide cloud services and data backup on a separate NAS. Immunology services include equipment and technical expertise for the performance of immunologic and diagnostic assays for infectious pathogens, including a Luminex 100 multiplex bead array system for detection of cytokines or RNA.

  • The Pediatric Animal Physiology Core is a centralized resource specializing in survival surgery for rats and mice in addition to USDA regulated animals such as rabbits, guinea pigs and piglets. Surgical services currently offered by the core include pulmonary banding in rat and neonatal rabbit, aortic banding, myocardial infarction, and intramyocardial injections (echo-guided or open chest). The core houses a Visualsonics Vevo 2100 High Frequency Ultrasound system that allows high resolution small animal ultrasound examinations towards characterizing cardiac function and liver and kidney blood flow.
  • The Pediatric Biomarkers Core – provides the equipment and technical expertise to perform small-molecule metabolite profile identification including analysis of markers related to oxidative stress.
  • Children’s Clinical and Translational Discovery Core – Offers laboratory and technical assistance for collecting, storage and analysis of biological samples including blood and biological fluids collected as part of a clinical study. These services are offered to investigators conducting basic science, epidemiologic, translational and clinical research related to improving child health.
  • The Pediatric Biostatistical Core – Two PhD level and four master’s level biostatisticians provide quantitative statistical assistance to investigators for analytic help and statistical methodology for study design, grant proposal preparation and manuscript preparation; database design for data collection is also available. In addition, a Qualitative Research Core arm is available to provide assistance in the design, collection, and analysis of data collected through qualitative methodologies and approaches such as focus groups, interviews, and observations.
  • The Pediatric General Equipment Core and Specimen Processing – common use equipment such as ultracentrifuges, RT-PCR, gel documentation systems, TopCount system, developer and specimen processing resources.
  • The Pediatrics Grant Editing/Manuscript Support (GEMS) Core provides expertise to assist with final editing of extramural grant applications and/or manuscripts reporting data generated from our pediatric research programs. Emory faculty member, Becky Kinkead, PhD, and grant consultant Janet Gross, PhD, work one-on-one with fellows and junior faculty towards building a research track record and securing extramural funding.
  • The Pediatric Heart Diseases Data Registry Core provides access to a rich registry of surgical, catheter-based and electrophysiologic studies and interventions for multiple pediatric heart diseases. This core provides consultation assistance and compile data for outcome studies related to pediatric heart diseases.
  • Cardiovascular Imaging Research Core (CIRC) – provides non-invasive imaging services (including EKG, echocardiography, stress test, stress echocardiography and cardiac MRI) for cardiovascular research involving infants, children and adolescents. The CIRC has dedicated space, equipment and staff to provide quality cardiovascular imaging data that is collected in a systematic manner.
  • Medical Imaging Resources – Both inpatient and research specific outpatient facilities exist to accommodate a variety of medical imaging needs including MRI, CT, PET, PET-CT, bone densitometry, fluoroscopy, nuclear medicine, interventional radiology, ultrasound, and X-ray. Pediatric sedation services are available, when needed.

The following Pediatric Research Alliance supported cores are designed specifically for child health researchers and are made readily available to pediatric researchers at a significantly reduced or fully subsidized cos...

Formal Workshops and Seminars
Last Updated: May 13, 2020

Formal workshops and seminars facilitate networking and intellectual interactions between investigators. Some examples include:

  • Department of Pediatrics Grand Rounds (monthly): Connects a clinical case from the hospital to a research presentation related to ongoing investigations and Emory and/or Children’s.
  • Pediatric Research Seminars (weekly): A monthly seminar dedicated to topics of interest to the pediatric research centers.
  • Pediatric Research “K-Club” Meeting Series (monthly): Sponsored by the Emory Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine and the GEORGIA CTSA, K-Club brings together young scientists with senior faculty who serve on study sections and who have extensive mentoring and grantsmanship expertise. Presentations may be attended in person or via a live web feed and are recorded for anytime viewing. In addition to the monthly program, attendees are offered the opportunity to meet individually with a professional grants educator/advisor for advice and direct feedback on their draft applications. K-Club topics span a wide scope and include a variety of specific sessions falling under the broad headings of 
    • Navigating the NIH and extramural research funding landscape
    • Strategies and approaches to writing NIH and other grant applications
    • General advice and guidance in preparing research grant applications
    • Research administration and logistics
    • Professional development including focused sessions on mentoring
  • Research Resources 101 (monthly): Research Resources 101 is jointly sponsored by the Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine. It is a monthly series designed to introduce early career and established investigators to research resources available at Emory University and provides information about the access to and use of individual clinical and basic research resources. Topics presented range from clinical to basic science research related and include subjects like electronic resources, regulatory support, consultative services and core facilities. Presentations may be attended in person or via a live web feed.
  • Southeastern Pediatric Research Conference (annually): Routinely attended by over 300 scientists from the southeast, this conference focuses on child health research.
  • FEED Conference (annually): Co-sponsored by the Emory Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine, the Faculty Education, Enrichment, and Development Conference or “FEED Conference” is an annual full day event that includes general presentations as well as career-path specific sessions for clinical researchers and basic scientists. Regularly presented topics disseminate practical information such as use of tools to facilitate collaboration, finding research funding, the manuscript review process and the Emory promotion process. 
  • Clinical Research Bootcamp (annually): The Emory School of Medicine Office of Faculty Development organizes and hosts an annual “Clinical Research Boot Camp,” a day-long program providing participants with a comprehensive overview of the major components involved in clinical research, including the development of sound research protocols, maintaining compliance and high ethical standards, and the successful planning of a productive research career. Specific topics addressed include study design, statistical resources and basic statistical techniques, securing research funding, Institutional Review Board considerations, conflict of interest and the importance of networking.
  • Junior Faculty Development Course (10 sessions over 5 months): Featuring a diverse faculty selected from throughout the School of Medicine, School of Public Health and Goizueta Business School, this course presents information necessary for success in an academic medical center using a variety of formats including didactic presentations, panel discussions, group and individual exercises, and case-based problem solving. Specific topics include organizational structure and finances, teaching, presentation skills, promotions and tenure, manuscript writing, negotiation and conflict resolution and ethics.
  • Emory Medicine Professional Leadership Enrichment and Development Program (EM-ProLEAD): The focus of EM-ProLEAD is to enrich leadership skills, enhance business knowledge, and develop strong partnerships across Emory. Aspiring leaders must be nominated by their division chiefs to be considered. The Program features lessons from campus leaders, more advanced training in financial planning and strategy, and exercises to develop recognition of individual strengths and areas for growth. The program is 10 months in length and includes mandatory 4 hour monthly sessions.
  • Laboratory Management Course: Once a year, the Emory Office of Postdoctoral Education offers a Laboratory Management training class to support the success of postdocs and junior faculty in establishing and managing their own independent basic science research labs. The course has five two-hour sessions with two major topics covered in each session in one-hour segments. Topics that are covered include setting up your own lab, budget management, hiring people, data management and managing the tenure-process.  The course is offered once a year in the Spring semester. A certificate of “Lab Management Training” is awarded to all who attend all 5 sessions and complete a final course project.

The Rollins School of Public Health also offers:

  • Extensive spectrum of courses including epidemiology, biostatistics, and data management in research are available to Emory faculty and through the MSCR program
  • Regularly scheduled seminars in epidemiology, biostatistics, and clinical trials methodologies
  • MSCR Journal Club: Critical assessment of research design and methodologies; discussion of patient-oriented research related topics (e.g. use of placebo; informed consent)
  • MSCR Clinical Research Colloquium: Series of seminars given by leaders in clinical investigation detailing their clinical investigation careers and how they have organized multidisciplinary approaches to address complex issues in biomedical research

Formal workshops and seminars facilitate networking and intellectual interactions between investigators. Some examples include:...

Grant and Manuscript Writing Resources
Last Updated: May 13, 2020

Numerous institutionally initiated and supported faculty development opportunities are available throughout Emory University:

  • The Pediatrics Grant Editing/Manuscript Support Core (GEMS) provides expertise to assist with final editing and of extramural grant applications and/or manuscripts reporting data generated from our pediatric research programs. Emory faculty member, Becky Kinkead, PhD, and grant consultant Janet Gross, PhD, work one-on-one with fellows and junior faculty towards building a research track record and securing extramural funding. http://www.pedsresearch.org/research/cores/gems-core/overview/
  • Grant strategy and writing programs are offered through a School of Medicine Office of Postdoctoral Education organized “K Tutorial,” a 6 hour course designed to provide in-depth information and targeted grant writing assistance to faculty preparing NIH K applications.
  • Department specific grant writing help is also offered through programs such as the Dept of Pediatrics sponsored “Grant Editing and Manuscript Support Core,” which is a fully subsidized service providing comprehensive grant and manuscript editing support.  
  • The Emory University Center for Faculty Development and Excellence organizes a faculty writing group called “The Writing Room” that is tailored to a small group of participants and designed to meet their specific needs and preferences. The Center for Faculty Development and Excellence serves as scheduler and convener of this group and facilitates the planning and communication of the current cohort of participants.  
  • The Emory School of Medicine Office of Faculty Development offers a “Peer-Mentoring Manuscript Development Initiative,” connecting junior faculty ready to publish with experienced faculty who can provide the needed guidance and mentoring.
  • The Laney Graduate School at Emory University organizes the “Grant Writing Program” that addresses every stage of grant proposal writing inducing developing fundable project ideas, presenting projects in persuasive ways and tailoring proposals to specific funders. The program is designed so that you can participate in a series of forums and workshops that build on one another and help you to develop your proposal and dissertation project. Workshops and informational sessions are offered throughout the year.
  • The Woodruff Health Sciences Library subscribes to Nature Masterclasses, an online scientific writing course. The masterclass consists of 15 course modules, varying in length from 30 to 75 minutes each, covering the entire scientific publishing process, from planning a paper to getting it published. The modules are taught by editors from the Nature journals and cover topics ranging from "Elements of Writing Style" to "Selecting a Journal for Publication" to "Measuring Impact."

Numerous institutionally initiated and supported faculty development opportunities are available throughout Emory University:...

Mentoring
Last Updated: February 14, 2020

Mentoring is a strong cultural component at all levels of Emory. The “Mentor Emory” program is organized annually and not only pairs mentees with seasoned mentors based on the mentee identified needs, but also facilitates the development of these relationships through moderated sessions and suggested communication strategies. The Department of Pediatrics also offers a variety of mentor-specific resources including the “Mentoring Check-up” series designed to seek feedback from junior investigators and learn what areas they are still in need of assistance seeking mentor resources to match. “Speed Mentoring” is a session held during the annual Emory Departments of Pediatrics and Medicine sponsored Faculty Education, Enrichment, and Development Conference that pairs junior faculty members with senior faculty members. This venue provides a series of short face-to-face meetings to facilitate networking and to promote mentor related discussions between individuals who may not otherwise have a chance to meet.

Mentoring is a strong cultural component at all levels of Emory. The “Mentor Emory” program is organized annually and not only pairs mentees with seasoned mentors based on the mentee identified needs, but also facilitates the development of these relationships through moderated se...

Pilot/Seed Grants
Last Updated: March 03, 2020

The Emory University Department of Pediatrics and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta are committed to providing grant support for investigators as they pursue extramural grant funding. Annual seed grant programs available for research initiatives include:

  • Pediatric Research Center Pilot Grants, which support basic, clinical and translational pediatric research projects with an emphasis on supporting junior faculty
  • Dudley Moore Nursing and Allied Health Research Fund, established to foster new and grow existing pediatric translational research among Children’s nursing staff and allied health professionals

Emory University also offers a variety of seed funding opportunities open to all Emory faculty, such as the Emory University Research Committee (URC) awards.

 

The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Pediatric Technology Center at Georgia Tech offers several child health focused seed funding opportunities:

  • The Imlay Innovation Fund supports collaborative activities and pediatric innovation and discovery efforts between the two institutions, focusing on practical steps that will lead to clinical impact and potential commercial opportunities.
  • The “Quick Wins” funding program pairs Children's clinicians with Georgia Tech engineers and computer scientists to deliver rapid solutions to address unmet clinical needs. Projects must propose delivery of a workable solution into the hands of a clinician within 18 months from the receipt of funds and project start. 

The Georgia CTSA offers targeted seed grant programs to promote clinical and translational science including support for research involving community-based research initiatives and development and support of research technologies aimed at benefitting the clinical community. Through collaboration with the Emory University Research Committee, the GEORGIA CTSA supports several health-science specific $30K awards for short-term research goals that can be accomplished in one year or less. The program prioritizes funding of research and creative projects to explore new areas of research that are likely to attract outside support.

 

The Emory University Department of Pediatrics and Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta are committed to providing grant support for investigators as they pursue extramural grant funding. Annual seed grant programs available for research initiatives include:...

Additional Partners in Patient Care, Research, and Teaching
Last Updated: February 11, 2020
  • Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance (Georgia CTSA) Emory is the lead partner in the Georgia CTSA, a consortium funded by the NIH and created to translate laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, engage communities in clinical research efforts, and train the next generation of clinical investigators. Other Georgia CTSA academic partners include Morehouse School of Medicine, Georgia Institute of Technology, and University of Georgia. 

  • Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC)

    Emory and CDC have a number of research contracts and consulting partnerships. Emory University Hospital’s Serious Communicable Diseases Unit, where the first patients in the U.S. with Ebola virus disease were treated, was built in collaboration with CDC. Emory faculty serve as advisers on public health committees throughout CDC, and CDC officers frequently serve as adjunct faculty in Emory’s schools of public health and medicine.
     
  • Georgia Center for Oncology Research and Education (Georgia CORE) Winship Cancer Institute works with Georgia CORE to partner with community-based physicians to make more clinical trials of new cancer treatments available to patients throughout the state.
     
  • Georgia Institute of Technology

    Emory and Georgia Tech share a joint biomedical engineering department ranked third in the nation by U.S. News & World Report. The two institutions also collaborate on initiatives in nanotechnology, vaccine delivery, clean air and water, health services research, regenerative medicine, bioinformatics, neurosciences, pediatrics, medical devices, immunoengineering, robotics, and design of “smart” equipment and facilities to help the elderly and disabled. 
  • Georgia Research Alliance (GRA)

    The GRA is a partnership of business, research universities, and state government that fosters economic development. Through the GRA, the state invests in Emory eminent scholars and research in nanotechnology, cancer, pediatrics, screening for new drugs, vaccines, AIDS and other infectious diseases, immunology, transplantation, clinical trials, bioinformatics, autism, imaging, cystic fibrosis, addiction, obesity, and Alzheimer’s disease. 
  • Morehouse School of Medicine

    Emory’s School of Medicine partners with Morehouse in serving patients at Grady Memorial Hospital (see page 12) and in training Morehouse residents. The two schools also partner in research through the Georgia CTSA (see above) and other research initiatives. 
  • University of Georgia (UGA)

    In addition to Emory’s partnership with UGA in the Georgia CTSA (see above), the two institutions collaborate in the NIH-sponsored Emory-UGA Center of Excellence for Influenza Research, part of a five-center national network tasked with improving pandemic preparedness. Emory, Georgia Tech, and UGA are partners in the Regenerative Engineering and Medicine center, which focuses on how the body can harness its own potential to heal.
  • Georgia Clinical & Translational Science Alliance (Georgia CTSA) Emory is the lead partner in the Georgia CTSA, a consortium funded by the NIH and created to translate laboratory discoveries into treatments for patients, engage communities in clinical research efforts, and train th...
DEPARTMENT OF RADIOLOGY
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

The Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory is known worldwide for its clinical expertise, scientific accomplishments, and strong leadership in basic and translational research. Our research programs are highly innovative and integrated with clinical practice and teaching, especially through mentoring of junior faculty towards successful research careers.

Research efforts are multidisciplinary and integrative, bringing together internationally renowned experts from the basic sciences, computer science, biomedical informatics, and biostatistics as well as from the clinical disciplines of cardiology, neurology, pathology, psychiatry, urology, psychology, and neuroscience, among others. Other collaborators include Emory's Center for Systems Imaging (CSI), Yerkes National Primate Research Center, and Winship Cancer Institute, a National Cancer Institute-Designated Comprehensive Cancer Center, as well as the Atlanta Clinical & Translational Science Institute, the Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering of Emory and Georgia Tech, and the Atlanta VA Medical Center.

Our research teams excel in the development, validation, and translation of innovative ideas that address critical imaging needs regarding cancer, cardiac, neurological, psychiatric, and metabolic and inflammatory diseases. This is achieved through the excellence of our six research teams: Molecular Imaging, Biomarker & Probe Development; Advanced Imaging Sciences; Computational Image Analysis & Guidance; Precision Imaging: Quantitative, Molecular & Image-Guided Technologies; Integrative Imaging Informatics; and Imaging Implementation Sciences.  The research environment at Emory is unparalleled. A group of PIs share strong interest particularly regarding cerebrovascular function, neuroimaging, and cognitive-related clinical trials. In addition, joined seminars, journal clubs and lab meetings greatly facilitate communication/discussion and team efforts. A set of facilities, programs, and laboratories at Emory University are available for the conduct and success of this project. (For Additional core services available at Emory, visit http://med.emory.edu/research/core_labs.

The Radiology Department uses state-of-the-art imaging and image-guided therapy to advance science through innovative and collaborative research efforts to increase our knowledge of human anatomy, physiology, and disease processes and to benefit patients at Emory and throughout the world.    https://med.emory.edu/departments/radiology/research/about-research.html

 

The Department of Radiology and Imaging Sciences at Emory is known worldwide for its clinical expertise, scientific accomplishments, and strong leade...

NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING FACILITIES, EUH
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

 

Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging is located on the first floor of Emory University Hospital and houses advanced imaging equipment for SPECT, SPECT/CT and PET/CT imaging. The nuclear medicine area includes radiopharmacy and chemistry laboratories, patient preparation rooms, and four scan rooms. The PET/CT suite, includes three patient preparation rooms, and a 430 square foot scan room with limited laboratory bench space.

Imaging systems include:

4 dual-detector SPECT cameras equipped with Low Energy High Resolution, Medium Energy and High Energy collimation:

1. Siemens Intevo T16 (SPECT / 16 slice CT, 2015) (also has ultra high resolution collimation)

2. Siemens Symbia T6 (SPECT / 6 slice CT, 2009) (also has ultra high resolution collimation)

3. GE Infinia (2005, also has pinhole collimation for high-resolution planar imaging)

4. GE Millennium MG (2004, low energy high resolution collimation only)

 

1 small field of view planar camera:

Digirad 2020tc digital gamma camera for mobile and small field of view imaging (2006, also has pinhole collimation for high-resolution planar imaging)

 

1 PET/CT System

GE Discovery 690 (2011, 16 slice CT) with time-of-flight and respiratory gating capability. The PET/CT suite, includes three patient preparation rooms, and a 430 square foot scan room with limited laboratory bench space.

 

Image processing workstations include:

1. GE Xeleris 4.0 Workstations (5 systems) – used for processing studies acquired on GE and Philips cameras.

2. Emory Cardiac Toolbox (SynterMed Inc., Atlanta, GA; 2 systems, 2019) – used for analysis and processing of all myocardial perfusion studies.

3. Siemens Symbia.NET workstations (3 systems, 2015) – used for processing studies acquired on the Siemens SPECT systems

4. 8 MIM Workstations (2 dedicated to research work) with advanced processing capabilities for oncologic and neurologic imaging.

5. Siemens SYNGO VIA server for processing/viewing CT and PET/CT. Two client stations installed at EUH.

6. 2 GE AW Server Workstations with Advanced Processing Capabilities

 

 ...

Center for Systems Imaging Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Center for Systems Imaging Core (CSIC)

 

CENTER FOR SYSTEMS IMAGING CORE (CSIC)

The Center for Systems Imaging Core (CSIC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides state-of-the art research and pre-clinical human and animal imaging to the Emory community. The CSIC supports the Center for Systems Imaging (CSI), which is the cross-disciplinary scientific, administrative, and educational home for imaging science at Emory University. The goals of this center are to: (1) support the advancement of scientific research focused on the development of imaging biomarkers, (2) promote the development and application of biomedical imaging technology particularly magnetic resonance imaging, (3) provide core services for human and animal imaging studies, and (4) to build cross-cutting educational and training programs.

The CSIC is housed in approximately 20,200 square feet across the Emory campus. This total comprises a 17,000 square foot facility on the 2nd floor of the Wesley Woods Health Center (WWHC) Building, 800 square feet for human MRI equipment in Emory University Hospital (EUH), 400 square feet for animal MRI equipment in Whitehead Biomedical Research Building (WBRB), and 2,000 square feet jointed MRI scanner and lab space in Emory Executive Park Campus Building 12 (EP12). The major imaging equipment housed at WWHC includes a Cyclotron/Radiochemistry lab, an MRI system, a PET HRRT human brain PET system, an Inveon micro PET-CT system, and a multispectral fluorescence animal imaging system. The Director of CSIC is John Oshinski, PhD (jnoshin@emory.edu) and the Medical Director is Jason Allen, MD, PhD (jason.w.allen@emory.edu).  Co-directors are Jon Nye (PET), Shella Keilholtz, PhD (Animal MRI), Deqiang Qiu, PhD (MRI), Mark Goodman, PhD (Radiochemistry). The Center Administrator is Orman Simpson (osimpso@emory.edu).  There are 11 full time staffs including MRI and PET Technologists, Radiopharmacists, and scientist to provide computer, MRI physics, and small animal support services.

Cyclotron and Radiochemistry

CSIC’s radiochemistry lab is directed by Dr. Mark Goodman, PhD and Ron Crowe (a licensed Radiopharmacist).  The lab houses a Siemens RDS 111 multiport, self-shielded, automated cyclotron producing a 11 MeV, 50 µA proton beam. The cyclotron is equipped with targets for the routine production of curie amounts of [18F]fluoride, [18F]fluorine, [11C]carbon dioxide, and [15O]oxygen. The radiochemistry area is a 2,100 square foot cyclotron vault and laboratory which includes four master slave manipulator arm-equipped hot cells, five mini-cells, one Siemens computer programmable two reaction vessel radiochemical processing unit, one GE TracerLab FXN unit, one semi-automated remote mini-syringe pump, two reaction vessel radiochemical processing units, one semi-automated remote mini-syringe pump fluorine-18 radiochemical processing unit, one automated oxygen-15 water synthesis module, one GE PETtrace carbon-11 methyl iodide module, one clean room, hot and cold waste systems and ventilation chemical and radiation monitoring systems. The radiochemistry laboratory is equipped with four pneumatic tube systems located in the four hot cells for rapid delivery of radiopharmaceuticals. The radiochemistry laboratory is fully equipped with a variety of modern analytical instruments which include one Carroll and Ramsey Associates eleven probe radiation detection system, one Waters Alliance radio-HPLC unit that is configured with UV/Vis and IN/US Radiometric detectors and one Waters radio-HPLC units that are configured with UV/Vis, and Bioscan Radiometric detectors, one Raytest radioactivity thin-layer chromatography system, two electrically activated rheodyne HPLC injectors, eight manual rheodyne HPLC injectors and 4 Waters' 515 HPLC pumps, one Bioscan hot cell radiometric detector, one Agilent 6890N radio-gas chromatograph  equipped with a thermal conductivity and flame ionization  detectors, one Oxford sodium iodide detector and well counter/multichannel analyzer, two Capintec 712M dose calibrators with four remote ionization chambers and four remote readouts and four Mettler electronic balances. The radiopharmacy routinely prepares [68Ga]Netspot, [18F]FACBC aka Axumin, [15O]water, [11C]PIB and [18F]T807 for human imaging studies.

Human Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

CSIC operates three full-time research dedicated Siemens Magnetom Prisma 3T MR scanners, and a shared clinical/research 3T wide-bore Siemens Skyra scanner. With multiple human research 3T MRI scanners, MRI studies can be effectively distributed across the Emory community. Studies that require close proximity to Emory University Hospital (EUH) or studies performed on in-patients can be performed on the scanner located on the ground floor of the hospital (CSI-EUH). Outpatient studies, where convenience of parking and more flexible scheduling is required can be performed at scanner located at the Wesley Woods (WW) campus (CSI-WW). Both scanners have been recently upgraded to the PrismaFIT platform and VE11C software.  Studies which require a wide-bore scanner or have a study population located at the Brain Health Institute (BHI) at Executive Park can use the Prisma scanner located there or the Skyra scanner next door for up to two hours per day (CSI-BHI).

Research Dedicated 3T Prisma MRI Scanners (EUH and WW)

MRI Scanners. Magnetom Prisma whole-body MR systems are equipped with a state-of-the art gradient system with a maximum (per axis) strength of 80 mT/m and slew rate of 200 T/m/sec, 64 independent RF receiver channels capable of 204 receiver connections, and a 2-channel RF transmitter. Multiple coils are available, including a 64-channel head/neck coil with 52 channels for imaging of the head region, a 32-channel head-only coil, a 20-channel head/neck coil, spine array coil, flexible chest coil, large and small flexible coil for extremity imaging, Tx/Rx CP Head Coil for large no-cap head space, and a 31P dual-tune flexible coil (only for Prisma@EUH) for phosphor spectroscopy. All scanners are running the VE11C version of the Siemens Syngo software. In addition, the scanners are equipped with DirectRF and DirectConnect technology, providing a significant increase in signal-to-noise ratio. The Prisma scanner platform allows efficient acquisition of high-resolution fMRI and DTI images with protocols compatible to those released by the Human Connectome Project. Furthermore, the Prisma scanner located at EUH is equipped with multinuclei spectroscopy and additional shimming power for improved magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A number of advanced research sequences are also available, including Vessel Size Imaging, quantitative Arterial Spin Labeling, Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging) and Simultaneous Multi-Slice EPI (allowing for sub-second high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data acquisition), 4D phase contrast MR for measuring time-resolved flow velocity, displacement encoding with stimulate echoes (DENSE), and multi-echo and ultra-short echo time sequences. With our master research agreement with the vendor, advanced work-in-progress MR sequences from the vendor, collaborators from other institutions, or developed sequences locally can be deployed.

Stimulus and response system for functional MRI. All scanners are equipped with peripheral systems for fMRI. Stimulus/response controls for behavioral tasks concurrent with fMRI are supported by an array of hardware specifically designed to allow investigator flexibility and precision. Visual presentation at EUH and WWHC sites are provided by a high resolution LCD projection system (1400x1050 SXGA, 4200 lumens, 1300:1 ratio) delivered from the back of the suite onto a custom fit screen mounted within the bore behind the participant’s head. The EP12 sites are equipped with Cambridge Research Systems BOLDScreen MRI compatible LED displays. Audio presentation is provided by an Avotec Silent Scan 3100 that has been calibrated to maintain sound pressure levels that are dependent directly on input (flat frequency response +/- 4dB, 200-4500Hz range). A fiber-optic ergonomic bilateral button response system from Psychology Software Tools exists, as well as a control unit to support custom response shapes (joysticks, steering wheels, wands) from Current Designs. All of the hardware are connected through a single switch that signals TTL trigger pulses and allows connectivity to an investigator’s laptop with non-proprietary connections (USB, 1/8” minijack audio, VGA & DVI). A dedicated stimulus and response monitoring computer running Eprime 2.0 and Presentation stimulus programming software also exists. An OptoAcoustics FOMRI MRI-compatible microphone featuring advanced active noise cancellation technology is available for speech fMRI paradigms. CSI-EUH MR scanner is also equipped with multi-nuclei option.  Currently a 31P/1H dual tune flexible coil is equipped and is applicable to phosphor MRS and metabolism studies.

CSI-WW: Other Equipment. A Biopac MP150 (Goleta, CA) MRI-compatible physiological response measurement system is available for collecting peripheral physiological measures. The MP150 system provides high resolution (16 bit), variable sample rates for analog and calculation channels, 16 analog inputs and two analog outputs, digital I/O lines (automatically control other TTL level equipment), and 16 online calculation channels. The MP150 System provides high-speed acquisition (400 kHz aggregate) via an Ethernet connection to a host computer. AcqKnowledge, the Biopac control and analysis software package is used to control the acquisition and can be used for data analysis. Available physiological measures are cardiac pulse, heart rate, heart period, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, respiration and electrodermal activity. The physiological measurements recorded by Biopac can be viewed real-time on a dedicated laptop computer through the Biopac data acquisition software. All responses can be recorded in MatlabTM, text or proprietary Biopac software formats, for retrospective analysis. A MEDRAD (Warrendale, PA) Power Injector system for contrast administration is also available.

CSI-WW: Mock MRI Scanner. A mock MR scanner is set up in the Wesley woods facility. This mock scanner is similar in appearance to the Siemens MRI scanners. It provides stimulus presentation and scanner noise emulations and is used to familiarize pediatric subjects with MRI scanner operation and to acclimate them to the MR scanning environment.

CSI-EUH: Other Equipment. Peripheral equipment, including computers and software for paradigm generation, setup for stimulus presentation, devices for recording behavioral data and physiological parameters including heartbeat, respiration, blood pressure, eye movement, ECG, EEG, and EMG are also established for operation concurrent with MR acquisition. Stimulus generation and presentation setup allows us to present acoustic, electric, and vibrational stimuli and oral and venous administration of liquids. Setup for response via button box, keyboard, mouse, speech, eye movement, and grip force has also been established. We are also equipped with an electronic shop and a small machine shop, providing the capability to fabricate custom MRI coils, animal holders, and special purpose stimulation devices. Other equipment in the scanner rooms includes an Ohmeda Biox 3700 Pulse oximeter, a Sage 351 infusion/withdrawal syringe pump, and a Dinamap 1846 SX Critikon vital signs monitor.

Shared Research/Clinical Skyra 3T MRI Scanner (BHI)

The shared MRI unit is a Siemens Medical Solutions (Malvern, PA) 3.0 Tesla Skyra MRI scanner, a full body scanner (70 cm bore) with Sonata gradient set (gradient amplitude of 40mT/m, maximum slew rate of 200T/m/sec).  The system is actively shielded and is equipped with 32 RF receiver channels and the total imaging matrix (TIM) suite.  Multiple coils are available for the systems, including a, 20 channel head matrix coil, two body matrix 8 channel flex coils, 8 channel head coil, 4 channel carotid coil and a 24 channel spine coil.

This scanner runs Siemens Syngo VE11A software and has a number of advanced Siemens product sequences including parallel imaging, SWI, BLADE, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) & Tractography. Auto Align feature for reproducible slice positioning based on a 3D MR brain atlas, BOLD imaging and in-line analysis suite with 3D PACE realtime motion correction, advanced cardiac package, and single and multi-voxel spectroscopy. A number advanced research sequences including Vessel Size Imaging, quantitative Arterial Spin Labeling, Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging) and Simultaneous Multi-Slice EPI (allowing for sub-second high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data acquisition), 4D phase contrast MR for measuring flow velocity, displacement encoding (DENSE), multi-echo and ultra-short echo time sequences are also available.

Human Positron Emission Tomography (PET) High Resolution Scanner

The PET HRRT scanner is the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available. It consists of concentric rings of LSO and LYSO detectors to provide depth of interaction information.  Because of this, the resolution is 2mm and fairly isotropic throughout the field of view.  Data is collected in list mode and reconstructed in 3D on a 16-node dual processor computer cluster.  Attenuation scanning is performed very rapidly in singles mode with a 30 mCi 137Cs point source.  This scanner provides state-of-the-art PET imaging for human or animal neuro studies or whole body imaging for animals or other objects less than 20 cm across.

The HRRT scanner room is a 400 sq. ft. room with 20 feet of bench space and a sink. The room is equipped with anesthesia gases and exhaust and a pneumatic tube system for delivery of doses from the cyclotron suite.  The pneumatic tube system terminates in a lead cave that contains a Capintec CRC-712M dose calibrator.  Stainless steel tubes from the cyclotron have been installed to deliver radiolabeled gases directly to the room from the cyclotron. The room also contains two 4 cu. ft. lead caves for storage of phantoms and calibration sources.

The PET/HRRT scanner control room (110 sq. ft.) contains two computer workstations, hardcopy output devices, the computers for controlling the scanner, and the video monitor command center, and a wide range of peripherals to read and write tapes and optical disks.

Animal Imaging

9.4T Bruker Animal MRI System. A 9.4T/21-cm Bruker animal MR imaging/spectroscopy system is housed in the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building in approximately 400 square feet of space. The magnet is actively shielded to reduce the extent of the fringe field. The imaging console is interfaced with a Bruker AVANCE spectrometer driven by a LINUX workstation and Bruker ParaVision 5.1 imaging software. The system is equipped with actively decoupled RF coils (volume coil as a transmitter and the surface coil as a receiver) with 2-RF channels: one with 1000 Watt RF amplifier for 1H NMR studies and the other with 800 Watt broadband amplifier (frequency range from 6 to 365 MHz) for X-nucleus NMR studies. A quadrature volume coil optimized for imaging rat brains and a variety of surface coils are also available. The scanner is equipped with a state-of-the-art BFG 200/115-S-14 12-cm diameter gradient insert from RRI (maximum gradient strength 675 mT/m, 120 µs rise time), two actively shielded Bruker BGA gradient sets, BGA-12 (12 cm, maximum gradient strength of 400 mT/m, 88 µs rise time) and BG-6 gradient set (6 cm, maximum gradient strength of 1000 mT/m, 55 µs rise time), all driven by Copley 200A/300V Gradient Amplifiers. Peripheral equipment including a) physiological signals monitoring system (BioTrig), used for synchronizing MR acquisitions with ECG or respiration triggering signals; b) animal anesthesia and physiology maintenance system; c) a comprehensive set of RF coils, suitable for studying different sized animals, different tissues and locations, and different nuclei including proton, 17O, 13C, 19F, an 31P; d) acoustic, optic, and electrical stimulation accessories for functional study. This system is suitable for studying mice, rats, ferrets and other small animals.

MicroPET/CT animal Scanner. The Inveon microPET is a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)–based preclinical PET scanner used primarily for small rodent imaging. The system is comprised of 64 detector blocks arranged in 4 contiguous rings, with a crystal ring diameter of 16.1 cm and an axial extent of 12.7 cm. The energy resolution is 14.6 %, sensitivity of 6.7%, scatter fraction of 8-17 % and spatial resolution of 1.8 mm FWHM. Data acquisition options include static, dynamic, respiratory gating and cardiac gating.  This represents the best available PET imaging for small objects.  The microPET scanner can be docked to the microCT scanner to form a microPET/microCT system.

The Inveon microCT Module is a high resolution 3D anatomic computed tomography (CT) imaging system for laboratory animal studies.  The x-ray source is for high speed whole mouse or rat preclinical x-ray CT studies and other applications requiring resolution down to 30 microns. The system is capable of respiratory and cardiac gating.  The scanner can be docked to the microPET scanner to form a microPET/microCT system.  This ultra-high speed implementation of a modified Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithm exploits recent developments in microprocessor technology to provide reconstructed image volumes within seconds of scan completion.  The base reconstruction system uses two Xeon processors to generate 512 x 512 x 768 voxel image volumes in real time during a scan.  Larger volumes are quickly reconstructed in multiple passes.

Computing Infrastructure

The CSIC is equipped with a state-of-the art computing facility consisting of a twenty-four nodes linux mini cluster, disk RAIDs with 728 TiB total storage capacity, a full rack capable of supporting up to 16U calculation nodes, including three NVidia Tesla GPU enhanced nodes, and an automated off-site back-up server with 600TiB backup storage configure to weekly rotation and two-month time machine backup scheme. It supports up to 560 simultaneous calculation threads.

For data processing and analysis, Matlab, IDL, LCmodel, SPSS, SPM, fsl, AFNI, freesurfer, ANTs, MrTrix, Slicer, tensorflow, and a variety of python based pipelines are installed and available on our cluster.

VNC, Nomachine, Docker, VMware and Oracle VirtualBox are also available for special virtualization and data processing need. The computer cluster is also a dicom receiving server open to all collaborating PIs for data storage and analysis purposes.

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Center for Systems Imaging Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for the Center for Systems Imaging Core (CSIC) Users

 

CENTER FOR SYSTEMS IMAGING CORE (CSIC)

Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI)

The Center for Systems Imaging Core (CSIC) operates three full-time research dedicated Siemens Magnetom Prisma 3T MR scanners, and a shared clinical/research 3T wide-bore Siemens Skyra scanner. With multiple human research 3T MRI scanners, MRI studies can be effectively distributed across the Emory community. Studies that require close proximity to Emory University Hospital (EUH) or studies performed on in-patients can be performed on the scanner located on the ground floor of the hospital (CSI-EUH). Outpatient studies, where convenience of parking and more flexible scheduling is required can be performed at scanner located at the Wesley Woods (WW) campus (CSI-WW). Both scanners have been recently upgraded to the PrismaFIT platform and VE11C software. Studies which require a wide-bore scanner or have a study population located at the Brain Health Institute (BHI) at Executive Park can use the Prisma scanner located there or the Skyra scanner next door for up to two hours per day (CSI-BHI).

Research Dedicated 3T Prisma MRI Scanners (EUH and WW)

MRI Scanners. Magnetom Prisma whole-body MR systems are equipped with a state-of-the art gradient system with a maximum (per axis) strength of 80 mT/m and slew rate of 200 T/m/sec, 64 independent RF receiver channels capable of 204 receiver connections, and a 2-channel RF transmitter. Multiple coils are available, including a 64-channel head/neck coil with 52 channels for imaging of the head region, a 32-channel head-only coil, a 20-channel head/neck coil, spine array coil, flexible chest coil, large and small flexible coil for extremity imaging, Tx/Rx CP Head Coil for large no-cap head space, and a 31P dual-tune flexible coil (only for Prisma@EUH) for phosphor spectroscopy. All scanners are running the VE11C version of the Siemens Syngo software. In addition, the scanners are equipped with DirectRF and DirectConnect technology, providing a significant increase in signal-to-noise ratio. The Prisma scanner platform allows efficient acquisition of high-resolution fMRI and DTI images with protocols compatible to those released by the Human Connectome Project. Furthermore, the Prisma scanner located at EUH is equipped with multinuclei spectroscopy and additional shimming power for improved magnetic resonance spectroscopy. A number of advanced research sequences are also available, including Vessel Size Imaging, quantitative Arterial Spin Labeling, Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging) and Simultaneous Multi-Slice EPI (allowing for sub-second high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data acquisition), 4D phase contrast MR for measuring time-resolved flow velocity, displacement encoding with stimulate echoes (DENSE), and multi-echo and ultra-short echo time sequences. With our master research agreement with the vendor, advanced work-in-progress MR sequences from the vendor, collaborators from other institutions, or developed sequences locally can be deployed.

Stimulus and response system for functional MRI. All scanners are equipped with peripheral systems for fMRI. Stimulus/response controls for behavioral tasks concurrent with fMRI are supported by an array of hardware specifically designed to allow investigator flexibility and precision. Visual presentation at EUH and WWHC sites are provided by a high resolution LCD projection system (1400x1050 SXGA, 4200 lumens, 1300:1 ratio) delivered from the back of the suite onto a custom fit screen mounted within the bore behind the participant’s head. The EP12 sites are equipped with Cambridge Research Systems BOLDScreen MRI compatible LED displays. Audio presentation is provided by an Avotec Silent Scan 3100 that has been calibrated to maintain sound pressure levels that are dependent directly on input (flat frequency response +/- 4dB, 200-4500Hz range). A fiber-optic ergonomic bilateral button response system from Psychology Software Tools exists, as well as a control unit to support custom response shapes (joysticks, steering wheels, wands) from Current Designs. Hardware are connected through a single switch that signals TTL trigger pulses and allows connectivity to an investigator’s laptop with non-proprietary connections (USB, 1/8” minijack audio, VGA & DVI). A dedicated stimulus and response monitoring computer running Eprime 2.0 and Presentation stimulus programming software also exists. An OptoAcoustics FOMRI MRI-compatible microphone featuring advanced active noise cancellation technology is available for speech fMRI paradigms. CSI-EUH MR scanner is also equipped with multi-nuclei option. Currently a 31P/1H dual tune flexible coil is equipped and is applicable to phosphor MRS and metabolism studies.

CSI-WW: Other Equipment. A Biopac MP150 (Goleta, CA) MRI-compatible physiological response measurement system is available for collecting peripheral physiological measures. The MP150 system provides high resolution (16 bit), variable sample rates for analog and calculation channels, 16 analog inputs and two analog outputs, digital I/O lines (automatically control other TTL level equipment), and 16 online calculation channels. The MP150 System provides high-speed acquisition (400 kHz aggregate) via an Ethernet connection to a host computer. AcqKnowledge, the Biopac control and analysis software package is used to control the acquisition and can be used for data analysis. Available physiological measures are cardiac pulse, heart rate, heart period, respiratory sinus arrhythmia, respiration and electrodermal activity. The physiological measurements recorded by Biopac can be viewed real-time on a dedicated laptop computer through the Biopac data acquisition software. All responses can be recorded in MatlabTM, text or proprietary Biopac software formats, for retrospective analysis. A MEDRAD (Warrendale, PA) Power Injector system for contrast administration is also available.

CSI-WW: Mock MRI Scanner. A mock MR scanner is set up in the Wesley woods facility. This mock scanner is similar in appearance to the Siemens MRI scanners. It provides stimulus presentation and scanner noise emulations and is used to familiarize pediatric subjects with MRI scanner operation and to acclimate them to the MR scanning environment.

CSI-EUH: Other Equipment. Peripheral equipment, including computers and software for paradigm generation, setup for stimulus presentation, devices for recording behavioral data and physiological parameters including heartbeat, respiration, blood pressure, eye movement, ECG, EEG, and EMG are also established for operation concurrent with MR acquisition. Stimulus generation and presentation setup allows us to present acoustic, electric, and vibrational stimuli and oral and venous administration of liquids. Setup for response via button box, keyboard, mouse, speech, eye movement, and grip force has also been established. We are also equipped with an electronic shop and a small machine shop, providing the capability to fabricate custom MRI coils, animal holders, and special purpose stimulation devices. Other equipment in the scanner rooms includes an Ohmeda Biox 3700 Pulse oximeter, a Sage 351 infusion/withdrawal syringe pump, and a Dinamap 1846 SX Critikon vital signs monitor.

Shared Research/Clinical Skyra 3T MRI Scanner (BHI)

The shared MRI unit is a Siemens Medical Solutions (Malvern, PA) 3.0 Tesla Skyra MRI scanner, a full body scanner (70 cm bore) with Sonata gradient set (gradient amplitude of 40mT/m, maximum slew rate of 200T/m/sec). The system is actively shielded and is equipped with 32 RF receiver channels and the total imaging matrix (TIM) suite. Multiple coils are available for the systems, including a, 20 channel head matrix coil, two body matrix 8 channel flex coils, 8 channel head coil, 4 channel carotid coil and a 24 channel spine coil.

This scanner runs Siemens Syngo VE11A software and has a number of advanced Siemens product sequences including parallel imaging, SWI, BLADE, Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) & Tractography. Auto Align feature for reproducible slice positioning based on a 3D MR brain atlas, BOLD imaging and in-line analysis suite with 3D PACE realtime motion correction, advanced cardiac package, and single and multi-voxel spectroscopy. A number advanced research sequences including Vessel Size Imaging, quantitative Arterial Spin Labeling, Diffusion Spectrum Imaging (for High Angular Resolution Diffusion Imaging) and Simultaneous Multi-Slice EPI (allowing for sub-second high-resolution whole-brain fMRI data acquisition), 4D phase contrast MR for measuring flow velocity, displacement encoding (DENSE), multi-echo and ultra-short echo time sequences are also available.

Computing Facilities

The CSIC is equipped with a state-of-the art computing facility consisting of a twenty-four nodes linux mini cluster, disk RAIDs with 529 TiB total storage capacity, a full rack capable of supporting up to 16U calculation nodes, including three NVidia Tesla GPU enhanced nodes, and an automated off-site back-up server with 394TiB backup storage configure to bi-weekly rotation and one-year time machine backup scheme. For data processing and analysis, Matlab, IDL, LCmodel, SPSS, SPM, fsl, AFNI, freesurfer, ANTs, MrTrix, Slicer, tensorflow, and a variety of python based pipelines are installed and available on our cluster. VMware and Oracle VirtualBox are also available for special virtualization need. The computer cluster is also a dicom receiving server open to all collaborating PIs for data storage and analysis purpose.

9.4T Bruker Animal MRI System

A 9.4T/21-cm Bruker animal MR imaging/spectroscopy system is housed in the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building in approximately 400 square feet of space. The magnet is actively shielded to reduce the extent of the fringe field. The imaging console is interfaced with a Bruker AVANCE spectrometer driven by a LINUX workstation and Bruker ParaVision 5.1 imaging software. The system is equipped with actively decoupled RF coils (volume coil as a transmitter and the surface coil as a receiver) with 2-RF channels: one with 1000 Watt RF amplifier for 1H NMR studies and the other with 800 Watt broadband amplifier (frequency range from 6 to 365 MHz) for X-nucleus NMR studies. A quadrature volume coil optimized for imaging rat brains and a variety of surface coils are also available. The scanner is equipped with a state-of-the-art BFG 200/115-S-14 12-cm diameter gradient insert from RRI (maximum gradient strength 675 mT/m, 120 usec risetime), two actively shielded Bruker BGA gradient sets, BGA-12 (12 cm, maximum gradient strength of 400 mT/m, 88 usec risetime) and BG-6 gradient set (6 cm, maximum gradient strength of 1000 mT/m, 55 usec risetime), all driven by Copley 200A/300V Gradient Amplifiers. Peripheral equipment including a) physiological signals monitoring system (BioTrig), used for synchronizing MR acquisitions with ECG or respiration triggering signals; b) animal anesthesia and physiology maintenance system; c) a comprehensive set of RF coils, suitable for studying different sized animals, different tissues and locations, and different nuclei including proton, 17O, 13C, 19F, an 31P; d) acoustic, optic, and electrical stimulation accessories for functional study. This system is suitable for studying mice, rats, ferrets and other small animals.

Cyclotron and Radiochemistry

CSIC’s radiochemistry lab is directed by Dr. Mark Goodman, PhD and Ron Crowe (a licensed Radiopharmacist).  The lab houses a Siemens RDS 111 multiport, self-shielded, automated cyclotron producing a 11 MeV, 50 µA proton beam. The cyclotron is equipped with targets for the routine production of curie amounts of [18F]fluoride, [11C]carbon dioxide, and [15O]oxygen and millicurie amounts of [13N]ammonia. The radiochemistry area is a 2,100 square foot cyclotron vault and laboratory which includes four master slave manipulator arm-equipped hot cells, five mini-cells, one Siemens computer programmable two reaction vessel radiochemical processing unit, one GE TracerLab FXN unit, one GE Fastlab unit, one Siemens automated oxygen-15 water synthesis module, two GE PETtrace carbon-11 methyl iodide modules, one clean room , hot and cold waste systems and ventilation chemical and radiation monitoring systems. A pharmaceutical grade germanium-68/gallium-68 generator is located in the clean room for routine production of as [68Ga]GaCl for the preparation of as [68Ga]-radiopharmaceuticals for preclinical small animal and human clinical and research imaging studies. The radiochemistry laboratory is equipped with four pneumatic tube systems located in the four hot cells for rapid delivery of radiopharmaceuticals. The radiochemistry laboratory is fully equipped with a variety of modern analytical instruments which include one Carroll and Ramsey Associates eleven probe radiation detection system, one Waters Alliance radio-HPLC unit that is configured with UV/Vis and IN/US Radiometric detectors and one Waters Breeze radio-HPLC units that are configured with  UV/Vis, and Bioscan Radiometric detectors, one Lab Logic Scan-RAM radioactivity thin-layer chromatography system, two electrically activated rheodyne HPLC injectors, eight manual rheodyne HPLC injectors and 4 Waters' 515 HPLC pumps, one Bioscan hot cell radiometric detector, one Agilent 6890N radio-gas chromatograph equipped with a thermal conductivity and flame ionization  detectors, one Lab Logic Gamma-RAM Radio-GC detector, one Ortec sodium iodide detector and well counter/multichannel analyzer, two Capintec 712M dose calibrators with four remote ionization chambers and four remote readouts and four Mettler electronic balances. The radiopharmacy routinely prepares [68Ga]Netspot, [18F]FACBC aka Axumin, [15O]water, [11C]PIB and [18F]T807 for human imaging studies.

Positron Emission Tomography (PET) High Resolution Scanner

The PET HRRT scanner is the highest resolution human brain PET scanner available. It consists of concentric rings of LSO and LYSO detectors to provide depth of interaction information. Because of this, the resolution is 2mm and fairly isotropic throughout the field of view. Data is collected in list mode and reconstructed in 3D on a 16-node dual processor computer cluster. Attenuation scanning is performed very rapidly in singles mode with a 30 mCi 137Cs point source. This scanner provides state-of-the-art PET imaging for human or animal neuro studies or whole body imaging for animals or other objects less than 20 cm across.

The HRRT scanner room is a 400 sq. ft. room with 20 feet of bench space and a sink. The room is equipped with anesthesia gases and exhaust and a pneumatic tube system for delivery of doses from the cyclotron suite. The pneumatic tube system terminates in a lead cave that contains a Capintec CRC-712M dose calibrator. Stainless steel tubes from the cyclotron have been installed to deliver radiolabeled gases directly to the room from the cyclotron. The room also contains two 4 cu. ft. lead caves for storage of phantoms and calibration sources.

The PET/HRRT scanner control room (110 sq. ft.) contains two computer workstations, hardcopy output devices, the computers for controlling the scanner, and the video monitor command center, and a wide range of peripherals to read and write tapes and optical disks.

MicroPET/CT Animal Scanner

The Inveon microPET is a lutetium oxyorthosilicate (LSO)–based preclinical PET scanner used primarily for small rodent imaging. The system is comprised of 64 detector blocks arranged in 4 contiguous rings, with a crystal ring diameter of 16.1 cm and an axial extent of 12.7 cm. The energy resolution is 14.6 %, sensitivity of 6.7%, scatter fraction of 8-17 % and spatial resolution of 1.8 mm FWHM. Data acquisition options include static, dynamic, respiratory gating and cardiac gating. This represents the best available PET imaging for small objects. The microPET scanner can be docked to the microCT scanner to form a microPET/microCT system.

The Inveon microCT Module is a high resolution 3D anatomic computed tomography (CT) imaging system for laboratory animal studies. The x-ray source is for high speed whole mouse or rat preclinical x-ray CT studies and other applications requiring resolution down to 30 microns. The system is capable of respiratory and cardiac gating. The scanner can be docked to the microPET scanner to form a microPET/microCT system.This ultra-high speed implementation of a modified Feldkamp cone beam reconstruction algorithm exploits recent developments in microprocessor technology to provide reconstructed image volumes within seconds of scan completion. The base reconstruction system uses two Xeon processors to generate 512 x 512 x 768 voxel image volumes in real time during a scan. Larger volumes are quickly reconstructed in multiple passes.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020...

Biostatistics Collaboration Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

 

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Biostatistics Collaboration Core (BCC)

 

The Biostatistics Collaboration Core (BCC) offers comprehensive bioinformatics, statistical, and computational collaboration to the University community. The primary mission of BCC is collaborating with investigators to choose appropriate study design for quantitative analysis and to assure appropriate implementation of statistical methodology in research. The BCC offers a complete range of services including study design; database design and management; bioinformatics needs; statistical analysis for abstracts and grants; and supporting the presentation and publication of research results. The faculty, staff, students, and facilities of the BCC are a part of the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics at Rollins School of Public Health.

 

 

The Biostatistics Collaboration Core (BCC) is a part of the Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics at the Rollins School of Public Health. The department occupies the entire third floor and more than half of the second floor of the Grace Crum Rollins building located at 1518 Clifton Rd. Faculty, staff and doctoral student offices, a computer laboratory, and a library/conference room, make up the 6,788 square feet of usable space. The Department of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics currently has 29 doctoral level faculty, 5 jointly appointed faculty members, 7 associate faculty members, 1 emerita faculty, and 18 adjunct faculty. The department has roughly 100 masters and doctoral students presently enrolled as degree seeking students.                                                                       

 

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core (EGMIC)

 

EMORY GLYCOMICS AND MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS CORE (EGMIC)

The Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core (EGMIC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is located in a laboratory in Room 175 in the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building. The dedicated laboratory space for ECGC totals approximately 1,500 sq. ft. and includes state-of-the-art equipment for printing and interrogating glycan microarrays for determining the binding specificity of glycan binding proteins and organisms. An additional 500 sq. ft. laboratory in Room 4110 in the O. Wayne Rollins Research Center houses instrumentation that quantifies molecular interactions using label-free methods including surface plasmon resonance with a BiaCoreX100 and isothermal titration calorimetry using a MicroCal Auto-iTC200. In the same room, we also host a Bruker UltraFlexII MALDI-TOF/TOF for glycomics and proteomic analyses, as well as general molecular weight characterization for other biomolecules including nucleic acids and intact proteins.

The EGMIC provides four major types of service

·       Functional glycomics including glycan microarray screening (Consortium for Functional Glycomics array of > 500 defined glycans, sialylated oligosaccharides array, human blood group glycan array, and others), chemical release of glycans from glycoconjugates, production of Tagged Glycan Library, production and analysis of Shotgun Glycan Microarray.

·       Glycomics analysis: glycomic profiling of molecular masses of glycans in mixtures released from purified glycoprotein, mucins, glycolipids, as well as cultured cells, tissues, or organs which can generate compositional information on glycans and can provide predictions of structures. 

·       Custom Microarray Printing of glycans, protein and providing microarray analysis

·       Convenient access to Biacore™ and MicroCal™ instruments for the study of molecular interactions including protein-glycan, protein-protein, protein-small molecules.

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020

Major Equipment for Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core (EGMIC) Users

 

EMORY GLYCOMICS AND MOLECULAR INTERACTIONS CORE (EGMIC)

Quanterix (Aushon) 2470 Arrayer – Microarray Printing Platform: Aushon’s 2470 microarrayer produces high quality arrays of DNA, proteins, glycans, polysaccharides, cell lysates and a variety of other samples using its proprietary soft touch deposition technology. The 2470 is a highly engineered platform designed with quality, reliability, flexibility and true walk-away automation in mind. Our unique deposition technology enables printing of even complex biological samples onto a broad range of substrates such as slides, membranes, microtiter plate wells, disks, wafers and chips.

The 2470 Arrayer has unmatched versatility, able to print any sample type onto substrates with unique shapes and chemistries as well as the most delicate of substrates such as nitrocellulose and silicon chips. From genomic materials to antibodies and cellular lysates, Aushon’s unique solid pin architecture reliably produces arrays of exceptional quality.

InnoScan® 1100 AL: The InnoScan 1100 AL is a high-resolution 3-color fluorescence scanner. With a resolution of up to 0.5µm/pixel, this scanner can scan a whole slide into high quality image. Combining high performance with full automation, InnoScan 1100 AL is ideal for high-density or three-color microarrays as well as for cell microarrays. Characterized by its ease of use, performance and versatility, the InnoScan 1100 AL is the ideal tool for cell microarrays as well as three-color microarrays.

·       High quality images: With a resolution of up to 0.5µm/pixel or a 20x objective equivalent, the InnoScan 1100 AL is the highest resolution microarray scanner on the market. This combined with a real time autofocus system and confocal PMT detection; the InnoScan 1100 AL provides high-quality images for detailed analysis of your microarrays.

·       Easy automation: Provided with a user-friendly image acquisition software and 24-slide autoloader, the InnoScan 1100 AL is capable of fully automated scanning of 24 slides at a time.

·       Multiplexed whole slide imaging: The InnoScan 1100 AL is capable of scanning any microscope slide with various substrates: cells, tissue, proteins, DNA, glycans, peptides and others. Equipped with three excitation channels, it empowers users with more multiplexing capabilities, thus allowing the analysis of several samples or markers on the same slide.

BiaCore™ X100: The Biacore X100 is a complete solution for biochemistry, molecular biology, or other research laboratories involved in the study of molecular interactions. The system contains all the key functionalities needed for day-to-day molecular interaction research with the purpose of understanding protein function and biological mechanisms.

·       Real-time insights into protein function & biological mechanisms

·       Kinetics, affinity, specificity and concentration analysis in one system

·       Define structure/function relationships

·       Understand the dynamics of molecular pathways

·       In development and research studies, select promising molecules that could be novel targets for research use, diagnostics, or therapy.

·       Develop and run assays for interactions involving LMW compounds

Biacore systems are used in areas such as pharmaceutical drug discovery, antibody characterization, proteomics, immunogenicity, biotherapeutic development and manufacture, and many life science research applications. A range of systems meet specific application needs. Customers include leading research centers, all of the leading global pharmaceutical companies, and many biotechnology companies.

MicroCal Auto-iTC200: The MicroCal ITC isothermal titration calorimeters all allow direct, label-free in solution measurement of binding affinity and thermodynamics in a single experiment, enabling the accurate determination of binding constants (KD), reaction stoichiometry (n), enthalpy (ΔH) and entropy (ΔS). This provides a complete thermodynamic profile of the molecular interaction. ITC goes beyond binding affinities and can elucidate the mechanisms underlying molecular interactions.

The MicroCal Auto-iTC200 is a fully automated, low volume, highly sensitive isothermal titration calorimeter. It delivers direct, label-free in solution measurement of all binding parameters in a single experiment. Applications include characterizing molecular interactions of small molecules, proteins, antibodies, nucleic acids, lipids and other biomolecules. It can also be used to measure enzyme kinetics.

Bruker UltraFlexII MALDI-TOF/TOF: Features high sensitivity, resolution and mass accuracy of MALDI-TOF and TOF/TOF technology for high-success expression proteomics and advanced biomarker discovery studies. It is also routinely used for glycomics profiling. MALDI-MS is easy to operate and is especially convenient for characterization of large biomolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids and polymers due to its high mass limit.

MAJOR EQUIP...

Emory Flow Cytometry Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Specific Fields Relevant for Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC) Users

 

EMORY FLOW CYTOMETRY CORE (EFCC)

The Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides unique services to Emory clinical and basic researchers. The central mission of the EFCC is to provide a top-tier flow cytometry resource that are widely available to the Emory research community and that integrates cutting-edge cytometric technologies with downstream analyses. The EFCC’s primary focus is to provide high-quality sorting services to its clientele, whether it is bulk sorting of multiple populations of various phenotypes or single- or multiple-cell deposition into culture plates of various size.

The EFCC offers advanced polychromatic flow cytometry training on its analyzer cytometer and consultation services for experimental design. The EFCC is located in the Dental Building at 1462 Clifton Rd., N.E. and Rollins Research Bldg at 1518 Clifton Rd., N.E. and has roughly 1500 sq. ft. of space divided into three laboratories.

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Flow Cytometry Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

Specific Fields Relevant for Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC) Users

 

EMORY FLOW CYTOMETRY CORE (EFCC)

The Emory Flow Cytometry Core (EFCC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), contains two BD FACSAria II 5-laser, 17-color sorters each capable of sorting 4 populations at once. In addition, both sorters can accommodate single- or multiple-cell deposition into culture plates. EFCC also houses two high-spec analyzer cytometers: 5 laser, 18-color BD LSR II and a 5-laser, 24-color BD Symphony A3.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020...

The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core - FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC)

 

EMORY MICROBIOME CORE FACILITIES

The Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) support microbiome studies by synergizing the skills and resources of three core facilities, namely The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC), The Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC), and The Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC). Workflows have been optimized between the three cores to form a pipeline whereby gnotobiotic studies are undertaken within the EGAC, sequencing of microbiome 16S rDNA from gnotobiotic studies undertaken by the EIGC, followed by expert analysis of the generated sequence data and characterization of the microbial alpha and beta diversities undertaken by the EICC.

EMORY GNOTOBIOTIC ANIMAL CORE (EGAC)

Introduction: The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is located in the five-story, 200,000-square-foot Health Sciences Research Building (HSRB), situated in rooms next to the Specific Pathogen Free (MPF) murine housing, as well as the Transgenic Mouse and Gene Targeting Core. The facility contains sixteen 3’ foot wide rigid isolators (Parkbio), each with the capacity to house 12 mice cages each. Each cage has a maximum capacity of 5 mice per cage. Class II biological cabinets are available to investigators for experimental use.

Animal welfare: The facility has a dedicated technician to monitor murine health. The facility is run under Emory University’s IACUC approved Standard Operating Procedures which oversees and certifies that care and use of the animals is ethical and humane. The IACUC oversight is implemented by an ongoing review and approval of the facility by way of written animal use protocols submitted for review by IACUC committee members. In addition, a semiannual inspection of all areas where animals are housed or undergo procedures is undertaken within the facility. Federal regulations, veterinary standards of care, campus policies, and facility standard operating procedures are used by the IACUCs in their evaluations of animal use.

Microbiological Testing: We employ rigorous microbiological testing of all autoclaved material entering the isolators, including the food, water and bedding. We also regularly monitor germ-free mice within isolators

and periodic control necropsies. Our tests include 1) real time quantitative PCR amplification of the V4 region 16S rRNA gene, 2) plating of fecal samples on BBL Brain Heart infusion with 10% Sheep Blood plates (nonselective controls for all strains) and incubation at 37ºC for 7 days, 3) Incubation in Thioglycollate medium with indicator, a medium used for the isolation and cultivation of aerobes, anaerobes and microaerophiles that are not excessively fastidious, and 4) Gram stain, which is a general visual examination for the presence of bacteria, and distinguishes between Gram-positive and Gram-negative organisms.

Gnotobiotic colonization: For colonization studies, 5-week-old germ-free mice are be inoculated with a either 1) a single microbe (mono-colonization) with a single bacterium), or 2) a defined finite group of microbes such as altered Schaedler flora (ASF) is a community of eight bacterial species: two Lactobacilli, one Bacteroides, one spiral bacteria of the Flexistipes genus, and four extremely oxygen sensitive (EOS) Fusobacterium species. The bacteria are selected for their dominance and persistence in the normal microflora of mice, and for their ability to be isolated and grown in laboratory settings. Germ-free animals, mainly mice, are infected with ASF for the purpose of studying the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. The standardized microbial cocktail enabled the controlled study of microbe and host interactions, role of microbes, pathogen effects, and intestinal immunity and disease association. Also, compared to germfree animals, ASF mice have fully developed immune system, resistance to opportunistic pathogens, and normal GI function and health, and are a great representation of normal mice, or 3) a polymicrobial population sourced from another mouse or a human clinical sample, for example a humans or animals that has been treated with an antibiotic which may be used to establish whether it is the altered microflora diversity that triggers changes in organismal physiology. Microbes may be introduced directly into the stomach with a 24-gauge ball-tipped gavage needle, or because mice are coprophagic, polymicrobial microbiome transfer from mouse to mouse may be done by introducing fecal pellets into the recipient cage. Routine microbiological testing to establish that the desired microbiome diversity is maintained throughout the experiment is done collecting stool samples, purification of DNA from the samples, and PCR amplification of the V4 region of the 16S rRNA gene from the sample. The PCR product are then sequenced and output files processed using the QIIME and MOTHUR pipelines. In addition, to gnotobiotic isolation within isolators, the facility will be equipped with the Tecniplast ISOcage system allowing gnotobiotic isolation at 36 single cage level, enabling multiple studies on the same rack.

ISOcage Tecniplast Bioexclusion System: Precise modulation of the microbiome is increasingly been appreciated as feasible approach to positively impact health and disease. However, heterogeneity of the microbiome between murine colonies housed in various facilities nationwide represent a tangible challenge to scientific rigor and reproducibility. Indeed, incongruent results have been observed between facilities when mice of the same phenotype were subjected to the same assays. We have developed a facility to directly control for microbiome heterogeneity by, where feasible, undertaking our assays in mice gnotobiotically colonized them with a defined flora. We undertake this by housing our mice in within our cutting edge Tecniplast ISOcageP Bioexclusion system. These are airtight individual mouse cages with high positive pressure that are specifically designed for germ-free, gnotobiotic and bioexclusion studies. The ISO cage system is the latest design for gontobiotics and germ-free animals because it allows researchers to undertake up to 36 simultaneous gnotobiotic studies, compared to only one study at a time in conventional multi-cage gnotobiotic isolators. For gnotobiotic experiments, mice can be initially raised under germ-free conditions. After weaning (3 weeks) mice will be transferred to an ISOcage cage.

For experiments with a fully characterized controlled microbiome background, mice may be gnotobiotically colonized with Altered Schaedler Flora (ASF). ASF is a standardized microbial blend of eight bacteria, which allows for the exquisitely meticulous studies in a fully defined microbiome background. Importantly, compared to germ-free animals, ASF-associated mice have normally developed immune system, they have resistance to opportunistic pathogens, and normal gastrointestinal health. They are thus an excellent representative model of normal mice with a defined microbiome. ASF colonization is done by the initial purchase of fecal pellets containing ASF from Taconic Biosciences Inc., which is a commercial supplier of gnotobiotic animals and materials. For probiotics supplementation experiments, ASF colonized mice are fed twice a week and housed in the Tecniplast ISOcageP Bioexclusion system. By this method we can achieve complete scientific reproducibility by undertaking our experiments with a defined background microbiome.  For experiments in this proposal, we will undertake fecal microbiome transplant experiments by isolating the samples from the luminal content od humans. It is imperative that following transplantation, the mice be maintained in bioexclusion conditions using the Tecniplast ISOcageP Bioexclusion system for the duration of the experiment (up to 8-weeks). This approach will eliminate the possibility of any further microbial components entering the transplanted microbiome.

Murine strains bred and held within the facility: The facility currently has two large breeding colonies to maintain strains of C57BL/6J.

Transferring new strains into the facility: Currently, we accept rederived germ-free mice from approved vendors, such as (but not limited to) Taconic Biosciences and The National Gnotobiotic Animal Resource Center at UNC. Mice must be shipped in approved transporters. Mice are transferred into newly set up isolators, and kept as the only genotype in said isolator for 4 weeks, and monitored weekly for germ-free status.     

Dedicated gnotobiotic barrier access suite: For this proposal, we will undertake bone fracture studies in germ-free and gnotobiotic conditions. GF and gnotobiotic mice used in manipulations will be housed within our cutting edge Tecniplast ISOcageP Bioexclusion system. GF and gnotobiotic mice will be transferred within the hermetically sealed ISO cage to a dedicated axenic Biological Safety Cabinet where fracture procedures will be undertaken.

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES...

Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC) Users

 

EMORY GNOTOBIOTIC ANIMAL CORE (EGAC)

The Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core (EGAC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides services that include experiments using germ-free mice and mice with defined microbiota. Major equipment in the EGAC includes:

Gnotobiotic semi-rigid isolators (Parkbio): The EGAC contains sixteen 3’ foot wide rigid isolators (Parkbio), each with the capacity to house 12 mice cages each. Each cage has a maximum capacity of 5 mice per cage. The chamber of the gnotobiotic isolator is constructed of polypropylene on five sides. The front panel or window can be either flexible PVC. The chamber of the isolator is 3’ foot wide rigid each with the capacity to house 12 mice cages each. The isolators are versatile and can be used for containment, germ-free and exclusion applications. The isolators have high quality cartridge type HEPA filters on both intake and exhaust air systems that provide top axenic security. The glove sleeve design is very spacious especially in the shoulder area allowing greater freedom of movement making the semi-rigid isolators highly ergonomic. The isolators are durable and made of impact resistant polypropylene construction which doesn't corrode from sterilants.

Tecniplast ISOcageP Bioexclusion system: These are airtight individual mouse cages with high positive pressure that are specifically designed for germ-free, gnotobiotic and bioexclusion studies. The ISO cage system is the latest design for gontobiotics and germ-free animals because it allows researchers to undertake up to 36 simultaneous gnotobiotic studies, compared to only one study at a time in conventional multi-cage gnotobiotic isolators. Features include strong bioexclusion for animal protection through cage level HEPA filter, combining the protection of an isolator with the ergonomics and density of an IVC cage for maximum animal safety, and saves space and costs with multiple studies on the same rack.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT...

Emory Integrated Computational Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated September 1, 2020

 

Specific Fields Relevant for Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) Users

 

EMORY INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL CORE (EICC)

The Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), offers comprehensive computational services and bioinformatics pipelines for the analysis of -omics data. The EICC has 1000 sq ft of dedicated office space on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building that provides for meeting customers, weekly meetings with the members of the Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC), and for monthly meetings of computational service providers from other cores within the EICF.

The EICC operates a small HPC system for short computational jobs. The cluster serves multiple functions related to core projects, including running NGS analysis pipelines, high-performance and parallel computing for disciplines such as proteomics, metabolomics, and imaging. The cluster is composed of 1 head node, 5 high-memory compute nodes, and one GPU node with 4x Tesla V100 GPUs. The cluster has a 2PB local storage array and offers access to Emory Isilon storage (1PB research-grade storage, 500TB of HIPAA compliant storage). A 10 Gbps ethernet switch provides a high-speed Storage Area Network (SAN) fabric. All storage arrays and compute nodes utilize the SAN for data transfer and are configured to connect via the 10 Gbps high-speed network. The cluster is connected to the Internet2 high-speed network for large data transfers to and from external systems. The cluster runs Scientific Linux 7 64-bit operating system on all nodes and utilizes Slurm for job submission and management. Configuration: One head node: 2 x 3.3 GHz 8-core CPUs, 64 GB RAM. Five compute nodes: 4 x 2.2 GHz 16-core CPUs, 512 GB RAM, 10 Gbps ethernet. One GPU node: 2 x 2.3 GHz 16-core CPUs, 384 GB RAM, 4 x nVidia Tesla V-100 GPU with 32 GB RAM.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) is an on-demand delivery of IT resources in the cloud with pay-as-you-go pricing. The AWS infrastructure is highly durable, available, elastic and scalable.  The Emory AWS environment is an AWS environment that is established according to the Emory business, security and compliance practices. Access to the Emory AWS Console must be authenticated with Emory Single sign-on. The virtual private cloud within the environment is protected by the Emory firewall. Secured connection (SSH or RDP) to an EC2 instance must be made from a workstation already located on the Emory Core network or via a VPN tunnel that is authenticated by 2-factor authentication. All AWS services have been reviewed by the Emory Security Team, and specific guidelines about utilizing these services for HIPAA or identifiable health information will be published. Emory University provides access to the Emory AWS environment to researchers as part of the overall IT support for research. AWS computing and data storage expenses, however, are not covered by the university, and must be budgeted for in grant applications. The EICC works with LITS to provide guidance on AWS usage and optimization.

The EICC also provides comprehensive computational services. We divide computational services into two main categories. The first enables expert users to access existing pipelines or develop their own custom analyses. The second category provides investigators the ability to have analyses performed by an EICC computational/bioinformatics expert for a set fee per project. Galaxy provides a wide variety of bioinformatic tools that allow the analysis, manipulation and visualization of large genome-wide datasets from a wide variety of platforms, including microarrays and next-generation sequencing instruments. The EICC also supports an enterprise HIPAA compliant LabKey server for Emory investigators. Collaborators outside Emory can also access this LabKey server infrastructure when collaborating with Emory investigators.

 

Standard analysis pipelines using other open-source software packages are implemented for DNA/RNA-seq/ChIP-seq/16S microbiome sequencing projects for human, animal, and microbial genomes. We have implemented the QIIME 2 pipeline for microbiome data analyses. Custom tools or other pipelines (such as mothur) are also available. For the analysis of RNA-seq data, we have implemented the Star and HTseq-count pipeline. Custom tools and pipelines can be developed for specialized projects such as fusion transcript detection. For targeted sequencing, exome sequencing, and whole genome sequencing, we use a custom PEMapper and PECaller pipeline. For variant annotation, we use the bystro.io software package. We have also implemented and analyze data sets with other mapping and variant identification pipelines (BWA, GATK). Substantial capacity exists for these integrated computing resources to support computational/bioinformatic analyses for EICC users. As part of our comprehensive bioinformatics services, we facilitate collaborations with existing biostatistics/bioinformatics service centers at Emory. These include the Winship Biostatistics and Bioinformatics Shared Resource headed by Dr. Jeffrey Switchenko, the Bioinformatics and Systems Biology Shared Resource headed by Dr. Manoj Bhasin, and the Biostatistics Consulting Core (BCC) headed by Dr. Renee Moore.

 

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated September 1, 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Computational Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) Users

 

EMORY INTEGRATED COMPUTATIONAL CORE (EICC)

The Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides computational and bioinformatics services to Emory investigators and is the “digital hub” for the EICF. The EICC has 1000 sq ft of dedicated office space on the 7th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building which provides for meeting customers, weekly meetings with the members of the Emory Integrated Genomics Core (EIGC), and for monthly meetings of computational service providers from other cores within the EICF. Servers and storage are located on the Emory campus in a climate controlled and secure data center. The EICC infrastructure and services include:

Computational Resources:

EICC Cluster: The EICC offers comprehensive computational services and bioinformatics pipelines for the analysis of -omics data. The EICC operates a small HPC system for short computational jobs. The cluster serves multiple functions related to core projects, including running NGS analysis pipelines, high-performance and parallel computing for disciplines such as proteomics, metabolomics, and imaging, hosting personal data analysis platforms such as Galaxy. The cluster is composed of 1 head node, 5 high-memory compute nodes, and 1 GPU node. The cluster has a 2PB local storage array and offers access to Emory Isilon storage (1PB research-grade storage, 500TB of HIPAA compliant storage). A 10 Gbps ethernet switch provides a high-speed Storage Area Network (SAN) fabric. All storage arrays and compute nodes utilize the SAN for data transfer, and are configured to connect via the 10 Gbps high-speed network. The cluster is connected to the Internet2 high-speed network for large data transfers to and from external systems. The cluster runs Scientific Linux 7 64-bit operating system on all nodes and utilizes Slurm for job submission and management. Configuration: One head node: 2 x 3.3 GHz 8-core CPUs, 64 GB RAM. Five compute nodes: 4 x 2.2 GHz 16-core CPUs, 512 GB RAM, 10 Gbps ethernet. One GPU node: 2 x 2.3 Ghz 16-core CPUs, 384 GB RAM, 4 x nVidia Tesla V-100 GPUs with 32 GB RAM, 10 Gbps ethernet.

Amazon Web Services (AWS) Cloud Computing: Amazon Web Services (AWS) is an on-demand delivery of IT resources in the cloud with pay-as-you-go pricing. The AWS infrastructure is highly durable, available, elastic and scalable.  The Emory AWS environment is an AWS environment that is established according to the Emory business, security and compliance practices. Access to the Emory AWS Console must be authenticated with Emory Single sign-on. The virtual private cloud within the environment is protected by the Emory firewall. Secured connection (SSH or RDP) to an EC2 instance must be made from a workstation already located on the Emory network or via a VPN tunnel that is authenticated by 2-factor authentication. All AWS services have been reviewed by the Emory Security Team, and specific guidelines about utilizing these services for HIPAA or identifiable health information will be published. Emory University provides access to the Emory AWS environment to researchers as part of the overall IT support for research. AWS computing and data storage expenses, however, are not covered by the university, and must be budgeted for in grant applications. The EICC works with LITS to provide guidance on AWS usage and optimization.

Computational Services: We divide computational services into two main categories. The first enables expert users to access existing pipelines or develop their own custom analyses. The second category provides investigators the ability to have analyses performed by an EICC computational/bioinformatics expert for a set fee per project. Galaxy provides a wide variety of bioinformatic tools that allow the analysis, manipulation and visualization of large genome-wide datasets from a wide variety of platforms, including microarrays and next-generation sequencing instruments. The EICC also supports an enterprise HIPAA compliant LabKey server for Emory investigators. Collaborators outside Emory can also access this LabKey server infrastructure when collaborating with Emory investigators. PBNAS is a low-cost data storage service offered by EICC.

Standard analysis pipelines using other open-source software packages are implemented for DNA/RNA-seq/ChIP-seq/16S microbiome sequencing projects for human, animal, and microbial genomes. We have implemented the QIIME 2 pipeline for microbiome data analyses. Custom tools or other pipelines (such as mothur) are also available. For the analysis of RNA-seq data, we have implemented the Star and HTseq-count pipeline. Custom tools and pipelines can be developed for specialized projects such as fusion transcript detection. For targeted sequencing, exome sequencing, and whole genome sequencing, we use a custom PEMapper and PECaller pipeline. For variant annotation, we use the bystro.io software package. We have also implemented and analyze data sets with other mapping and variant identification pipelines (BWA, GATK). Substantial capacity exists for these integrated computing resources to support computational/bioinformatic analyses for EICC users.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EIMLC)

 

The Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EIMLC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) performs quantitative metabolomics and lipidomics analyses on samples from a wide variety of biological matrices (e.g. blood, serum, plasma, solid tissues, cell extracts, etc.) to support both clinical and basic research efforts on campus and in the broader research community. These analyses provide insights into lipids and lipid precursors whose abundance can be monitored as biomarkers to predict and follow progression of a wide range of diseases, such as metabolic disorders (e.g. obesity, type II diabetes, and NAFLD), neurodegenerative diseases (e.g. Alzheimer’s Disease and Parkinson’s Disease), and cancer (e.g. prostate and breast cancer). In addition to lipidomics assays, EILMC capabilities also include targeted and untargeted metabolomics as well as quantitative, plate-based metabolomics, Biocrates Quant500.

 

The EIMLC is located in Rms. 4075, 4071, G240 and G241 in O. Wayne Rollins Research Center and has 1125 square feet of dedicated wet-lab space. The EIMLC also has a 240 sq ft dedicated office adjacent to the laboratory space on the 4th floor of the O. Wayne Rollins Research Center, which provides space for computational services and customer consultations.

 

The EIMLC lab houses a Sciex QTrap5500 enhanced high performance hybrid triple quadrupole/linear ion trap LC/MS/MS mass spectrometer with mass range of m/z 5 to 1250 in triple quadrupole mode, and 5-1000 in LIT mode. For high resolution mass spectrometry, the EIMLC utilizes a Thermo ID-X tribrid mass spectrometer that boasts resolution up to 500,000 FWHM and scan speeds up to 30Hz.  Both mass spectrometers feature linear ion traps, permitting MSn studies that aid in the unambiguous characterization of low abundance species. Each mass spectrometer is paired with a complimenting HPLC/UHPLC - the ExionLC AC HPLC/UHPLC system and Vanquish UHPLC, respectively. Data analysis is done using a 44 core Xenon workstation with 196 GB of RAM for processing large datasets. Computer workstations with lipid processing software, such as LipidView (Sciex), MultiQuant (Sciex), LipidSearch (Thermo), and Compound Discover (Thermo), are also available. Minor equipment includes -80 °C freezers, nitrogen evaporators, Biotge Extrahera; a robotic SPE instrument for fully automated specialized lipid extractions, a table top centrifuge, a fume hood, rockers, analytical balances, and multisample vortexers. The EIMLC has computers networked locally with internet-accessible ethernet lines and to a dedicated 24 Tb backup drive (Synology DiskStation). The EILC office is outfitted with three Dell OptiPlex 9020 computers with dual 24” monitors for data processing and 1TB external storage for local backup.                                                       

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

                                                                                                       MAJOR EQUIPMENT

                                                                                                Updated 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EIMLC) Users

 

EMORY INTEGRATED METABOLOMICS AND LIPIDOMICS CORE (EIMLC)

The Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core (EIMLC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), performs quantitative metabolomics and lipidomics analyses on samples from a wide variety of biological matrices (e.g. blood, serum, plasma, solid tissues, cell extracts, etc.) to support both clinical and basic research efforts on campus and in the broader research community. Major equipment available in the EIMLC includes:

Sample Preparation:

Omni BeadRuptor: Sample preparation instrument used to grind, lyse, and homogenize samples. This automated, bead mill homogenizer is able to prepare biological samples, including brain, liver, heart, skeletal muscle, adipose, as well as cell culture for lipid or metabolite extraction.

Biotage Extrahera Solid Phase Extraction Robot: This instrument is a robust and automated liquid handling instrument that performs solid phase liquid extractions in both single cassette and 96-well plate formats.

Chromatography:

Sciex Exion LC U/HPLC: Front end liquid chromatography instrument with dual pumping system capable of gradients up to 3ml/min at 6600 bar (9500 PSI).  Instrument contains a cooled autosampler that accommodates two 96 well plates or 105 vials. Used in combination with Sciex Qtrap5500.

1290 Infinity II HPLC: Powerful front end liquid chromatography system capable of 1300bar pressures at 5ml/min. Contains a binary pumping system and chilled autosampler. Used in tandem with Agilent 6495c.

Thermo Vanquish UPLC: High end UHPLC instrument capable of pressures up to 1500 bar at flow rates of 5ml/min. System contains a binary pump and refrigerated autosampler with excellent precision, accuracy, and short cycle times. For use with Thermo IDX hybrid mass spectrometer.

Mass Spectrometers:

Sciex QTrap 5500: Hybrid mass spectrometer with triple quadrupole and linear ion trap, capable of MSn experiments. Instrument has a mass range of m/z 5-1250 and a dynamic range of up to 6 orders of magnitude. Used for targeted lipidomics experiments. 

Agilent 6495c: Advanced, high sensitivity triple quadrupole mass spectrometer with jet ion source permitting 5x more ionization than traditional sources, increasing analytical sensitivity. Mass range of m/z 5-3000 and wide dynamic range. Used for MRM based targeted lipidomics experiments.

 

Thermo ID-X Tribrid: Hybrid Orbitrap mass spectrometer offering resolution up to 500,000 FWHM in mass range of m/z 50-2000. Contains a linear ion trap capable of MSn scans at 40Hz. Used for ultra high resolution untargeted, global lipidomics as well as metabolomics.

Software:

Analyst 1.5: Used for the operation of QTrap5500 mass spectrometer and collection and processing of targeted lipidomics data.

LipidView: Software used for the identification of lipids in biological samples by searching parent and fragment ion masses to a proprietary database containing over 25,000 lipids in a wide variety of lipid classes.

MultiQuant: Modular software used for processing MRM based datasets. Uses algorithms optimized for the automated integration of peaks with low signal to noise ratios.

MassHunter: Software used for the operation and analysis of mass spectrometry data collected on the Agilent 6495c.

Excalibur: Used for the operation of Thermo IDX mass spectrometer. Contains modules for the processing and analysis of mass spectrometry data.

LipidSearch: Lipid identification software that searching fragment ion data against a proprietary database to streamline identification of lipid species and visualization of data.

Compound Discoverer: Software that streamlines identification of small molecules by searching full scan and MSn data with known compounds and molecular pathways.

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Emory Integrated Proteomics Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: September 1, 2020

 

Fields Relevant for Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC) Users

 

EMORY INTEGRATED PROTEOMICS CORE (EIPC)

The Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides protein analytical services by cutting-edge mass spectrometry (MS). The EIPC has 200 sq ft of dedicated office adjacent to the 1500sq ft laboratory space on the 5th floor of the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building, which provides for computational services, meeting customers, and weekly EIPC team meetings.

The EIPC houses several mass spectrometers—hybrid quadrupole-orbitrap including a Q-Exactive, and a Q-Exactive HF-X; tribrid mass spectrometers including two Orbitrap Fusion, and an Orbitrap Fusion Lumos; and a TSQ Altis triple-stage quadrupole (see major equipment). Each instrument is coupled with an autosampler and HPLC system. The system allows automated capillary LC-MS/MS runs for top-down, middle-down and bottom-up analyses with high resolution. These mass spectrometers are capable of detecting peptides at subfemtomolar level, identifying hundreds to thousands of proteins in complex mixtures, mapping posttranslational modification sites, and quantifying proteins based on label-free methods or different labeling strategies (e.g. TMT and SILAC). The nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LC System is designed for nanoscale, capillary, and narrow-bore separations to attain the highest chromatographic resolution, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Both qualitative and quantitative projects benefit from the added pressure capacity (up to 10,000 psi); sensitivity is increased several folds with the use of sub-2 µm chromatographic resins and retention time reproducibility enables label-free quantitative approaches. The core has also established the electrostatic repulsion hydrophilic interaction chromatography (ERLIC) that uses both hydrophilic interaction and electrostatic forces on an Agilent 1100 HPLC.

 

The computational platform is capable of performing sophisticated data analyses, including database search (i.e. matching MS/MS spectra to peptide sequences), data filtering (i.e. removing false positive matches), statistical inference, as well as data storage, presentation and distribution. EIPC has multiple search engine platforms including Sequest, Mascot, and Byonics. A Sage-N Sorcerer2 IDA is located in-house and currently runs Sorcerer Sequest and Scaffold. The Mascot, Proteome Discoverer 2.0, and Byonic platforms are licensed on a computing cluster in collaboration with the Emory Integrated Computing Core. Numerous computational tools have also been developed for high throughput data processing. All personnel have access to high-end workstations capable of processing both raw and post-analyzed data.                                                                                      

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: September 1, 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Proteomics Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: September 1, 2020

 

Major Equipment for Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC) Users

 

EMORY INTEGRATED PROTEOMICS CORE (EIPC)

Q Exactive Plus Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap Mass Spectrometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific): The Q Exactive Plus Orbitrap is coupled to an autosampler and nanoAcquity UPLC system. This instrument features high ion currents because of an S-lens, and fast high-energy collision-induced dissociation (HCD) peptide fragmentation because of parallel filling and detection modes. The image current from the detector is processed by an “enhanced Fourier Transformation” algorithm, enabling high mass spectrometric resolution (up to 140,000 FWHM). With almost instantaneous isolation and fragmentation, the instrument can sequence 10 peptides per second. This instrument is also capable of proteomics approach termed parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), which is a targeted proteomics strategy wherein all product ions of a peptide are simultaneously co-detected under conditions that offer high resolution and high mass accuracy.

Q Exactive HF-X Hybrid Quadrupole-Orbitrap mass spectrometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific): The Q Exactive HF-X mass spectrometer harbors a high-field (HF) Orbitrap mass analyzer and an Advanced Quadrupole Technology (AQT) resulting in higher resolution (240,000 at m/z 200) and scan speed (up to 40 Hz). A High Capacity Transfer Tube (HCTT) and electrodynamic ion funnel also contributes towards the improved sensitivity of the instrument. This mass spectrometer enables fast identification and analysis of peptides, label-free and TMT quantitation. An EASY-nLC™ 1200 system is connected with the mass spectrometer for peptide separation.

Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid Mass Spectrometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific): The fusion is an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer and is coupled to an UltiMate 3000 RSLCnano system. The Fusion is equipped with a mass filter, a collision cell, a high-field Orbitrap analyzer, and, finally, a dual cell linear ion trap analyzer (Q-OT-qIT). This system offers high MS/MS acquisition speed of 20 Hz and detects up to 19 peptides sequences within a single second of operation. The Fusion also has resolution in excess of 450,000 allowing for separation of isobaric interferences.

Orbitrap Fusion Tribrid Mass Spectrometer with Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) (Thermo Fisher Scientific): The fusion is an Orbitrap hybrid mass spectrometer, which is coupled to an UltiMate 3000 RSLCnano system. The Fusion is equipped with a mass filter, a collision cell, a high-field Orbitrap analyzer, and, finally, a dual cell linear ion trap analyzer (Q-OT-qIT). This system offers high MS/MS acquisition speed of 20 Hz and detects up to 19 peptides sequences within a single second of operation. The Fusion also has resolution in excess of 450,000 allowing for separation of isobaric interferences. This Fusion is also equipped with Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD), which is an orthogonal fragmentation technique to HCD and collision induced dissociation (CID), which will enhance peptide identification and localization of labile post-translational modifications (PTMs), such as glycosylation and phosphorylation.

Orbitrap Fusion Lumos Mass Spectrometer with Electron Transfer Dissociation (ETD) (Thermo Fisher Scientific): The Fusion Lumos mass spectrometer has three mass analyzers— quadrupole, orbitrap, and linear ion trap— as in the fusion tribrid system. The instrument houses an upgraded ion optics (High Capacity Transfer Tube and Electrodynamic Ion Funnel), an Advanced Quadrupole Technology (AQT), and a new ETD-HD feature. The MS/MS acquisition rates of Lumos is up to 20 Hz for both Orbitrap and linear ion trap measurements. Ultra-high-field Orbitrap mass analyzer increases the resolving power up to 500,000 FWHM at m/z 200. Synchronous Precursor Selection (SPS) feature significantly augments the number of peptides and proteins identified and improves quantitative accuracy in TMT experiments. This feature is also available in other Fusion instruments. Lumos offers several fragmentation modes, like CID, HCD, ETD, and EThcD, that are helpful for PTM analysis. Lumos is connected to an EASY-nLC™ 1200 system for UHPLC.

TSQ Altis triple-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer (Thermo Fisher Scientific): The TSQ Altis is a triple-stage quadrupole mass spectrometer fitted with segmented quadrupoles with hyperbolic faces provides ultra-high sensitivity (0.2 Da FWHM) for high resolution selected reaction monitoring (H-SRM). Additionally, the active collision cell with axial DC field facilitates fast selected reaction monitoring (up to 600 SRMs/sec). This instrument is suitable for the quantitation of low-level compounds in complex biological matrices. The mass spectrometer is coupled to a Waters nanoAcquity UPLC system.

UltiMate 3000 RSLCnano (Thermo Fisher Scientific): UltiMate 3000 RSLCnano system can be operated with nano-, capillary-, and micro-flow options. ProFlow technology in this system improves nano flow rate control resulting in high retention time precision that is crucial for LC-MS based proteomics methodology. The pressure capacity of this UHPLC is up to 860 bar (12473 psi).

nanoAcquity UPLC (Waters Corporation): The nanoACQUITY UltraPerformance LC System is designed for nano-scale, capillary, and narrow-bore separations to attain the highest chromatographic resolution, sensitivity, and reproducibility. Both qualitative and quantitative projects benefit from the added pressure capacity (up to 10, 000 psi); sensitivity is increased several folds with the use of sub-2 μm chromatographic resins and retention time reproducibility enables label-free quantitative approaches.

EASY-nLC 1200 System (Thermo Fisher Scientific): EASY-nLC 1200 System is a capillary UHPLC system that allows for a maximum backpressure up to 1200 bar (17,404 psi). This higher pressure allowance increases the peak capacity resulting in better peptide separation and increased throughput.

Liquid Handling Station (LHS): The BRAND Liquid Handling Station handles routine pipetting tasks (e.g., BCA assay, protein digestion, aliquoting, etc.) at high speed and with the highest precision.

Off-line Liquid Chromatography systems (Agilent Technologies): An Agilent 1100 series system comprising of a degasser, binary pump, autosampler, UV-detector and a fraction collector is available for offline fractionation of samples. The system is capable to handling all current fractionation methods including high-pH reverse phase, SCX and ERLIC.

Computing: The Emory Integrated Proteomics Core (EIPC) has multiple search engine platforms including Sequest, Mascot, and Byonics. A Sage-N Sorcerer2 IDA is located in-house and currently runs SorcererSequest and Scaffold.  The Mascot, Proteome Discoverer 2.0, and Byonic platforms are licensed on a computing cluster in collaboration with the Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC). Core facility personnel have access to high-end workstations capable of processing both raw and post-analyzed data.

Shared equipment: Includes gel imagers for chemiluminescence and fluorescence, equipment for protein, a LiCor fluorescent system for quantitative immunoblotting. Fluorescence and standard microplate readers are available for protein quantification. High-speed and ultra-centrifuges are available as core equipment. There are sliding microtomes, standard and dual beam spectrophotometers, cryostats, pH meters, balances, oven, refrigerators, hot plates, stirrers, -70C freezers, and other standard equipment.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: September 1, 2020...

Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

Facilities and Resources

Updated: September 1, 2020

 

Fields Relevant for Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC) Users

 

EMORY MULTIPLEXED IMMUNOASSAY CORE (EMIC)

The Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF) uses the multiplexed immunoassays to bring a powerful research platform to help investigators from Emory University and external researchers. The EMIC is located in a laboratory 665E on the 6th floor of the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building. The EMIC performs and analyzes multiplex immunoassays to measure the levels of single or multiple targets within a single, small volume sample on the Meso Scale Discovery (MSD) platform.  EMIC houses two high-sensitive imaging detection system Meso Scale Discovery SECTOR2400 and Quickplex SQ120. MSD uses electrochemiluminescence via a cooled scientific-grade CCD camera to detect binding events with a broad dynamic range and exceptional sensitivity(pg/ml). MSD supports a wide variety of assays from different research area: immunology, neurobiology, oncology, toxicology, cardiovascular, metabolic etc. MSD measures protein levels in many biological matrices (plasma, serum, CSF, urine, stool tissues, etc).

The EMIC houses two plate readers (SECTOR2400 and QuickPlex SQ120) to meet the needs of its users. These instruments require no customer calibration or maintenance, no complicated fluidics, and no between-read cleaning. The combination of rapid read times (90 seconds per plate) and the ability to perform multiple, simultaneous tests on a single sample increases productivity, conserves sample, and delivers results quickly. The MSD platform has a wide variety of commercially available assay kits and a full line of components and reagents for developing customized assays.

Facilities and Resources...

Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated September 1, 2020

 

Major Equipment for Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC) Users

 

EMORY MULTIPLEXED IMMUNOASSAY CORE (EMIC)

The Emory Multiplexed Immunoassay Core (EMIC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), houses two plate readers (SECTOR2400 and QuickPlex SQ120) to meet the needs of its users. These instruments require no customer calibration or maintenance, no complicated fluidics, and no between-read cleaning. The combination of rapid read times (90 seconds per plate) and the ability to perform multiple, simultaneous tests on a single sample increases productivity, conserves sample, and delivers results quickly. The MSD platform has a wide variety of commercially available assay kits and a full line of components and reagents for developing customized assays.

One high sensitivity imaging detection system SECTOR2400: provide unparalleled sensitivity and dynamic range, simple protocols, rapid and continuous reads, and fast, well-organized results via DISCOVERY WORKBENCH assay analysis software.

One high sensitivity imaging detection system MESO QuickPlex SQ 120: provide unparalleled sensitivity and dynamic range, simple protocols, rapid and continuous reads, and fast, well-organized results via DISCOVERY WORKBENCH assay analysis software.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT...

Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core (ExCITE) - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: September 1, 2020

 

Specific Fields Relevant for Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core (ExCITE) Users

 

EMORY CELLULAR AND IMMUNOTHERAPY CORE (ExCITE)

The Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core (ExCITE), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is a clinical cell manufacturing facility that prepares cell and immunotherapy products for transplantation and GMP-grade cells and reagents. The central mission of the  is to provide GMP-compliant cell manufacturing and consulting for the translational of Emory-based research into early phase clinical trials. The types of products routinely handled in ExCITE include autologous and allogeneic bone marrow, peripheral blood hematopoietic cell products from mobilized donors, non-mobilized apheresis products, expired platelet units for the preparation of GMP-grade platelet lysate and cellular products from external companies. Standard processes performed by EPIC include isolation, expansion, cryopreservation and thaw of Mesenchymal stem/stromal cells, dendritic cells and other cellular products from FDA-approved studies. EPIC is also responsible for CD34+ enrichment and specific cell depletion using CliniMACS technology regulated by the FDA under Investigational New Drugs/Investigational Device Exemptions (IND/IDE).

The ExCITE is accredited by the Foundation for the Accreditation of Cellular Therapy (FACT) for more than minimally manipulated cellular therapy products. Two laminar flow hoods (Nuaire) and 6 CO2 incubators are also located within the space. The infrastructure includes equipment necessary for cell processing including a Cobe 2991 cell washer, a centrifuge, a light microscope and phase microscope, rocking platforms, digital vortex mixer and sealers. The ExCITE has a computer for operations inside the clean room. Individual members of the ExCITE also have personal workstations that support their core activities. The ExCITE has dedicated office on the same floor to the laboratory space on the 6th floor of the University Hospital, which provides for computational services, meeting customers, and weekly EPIC team meetings.

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: September 1, 2020

 ...

Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core (ExCITE) - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020

 

Specific Fields Relevant for Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core (ExCITE) Users

 

EMORY CELLULAR AND IMMUNOTHERAPY CORE (ExCITE)

The Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core (ExCITE), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is a 300 square feet ISO7 clean room located on the 5th floor of the Emory University Hospital with dedicated space for GMP compliant cell processing. Two laminar flow hoods (Nuaire) and 6 CO2 incubators are also located within the space. The infrastructure includes equipment necessary for cell processing including a Cobe 2991 cell washer, a centrifuge, a light microscope and phase microscope, rocking platforms, digital vortex mixer and sealers. Other specific equipment include:

Sysmex XE-2100L: The Sysmex XE-2100L Analyzer is a quantitative automated hematology analyzer for in vitro diagnostic use in clinical laboratory for determining hematological parameters such as WBC, RBC’s, nucleated RBC’s, HCT, HG, immature cells scattergram, pattern data of cell size distribution curves for platelet, 23 analysis parameters, and research data of 4 parameters.

Aero Trak-9510: Aero Trak-9510 Airborne Particle Counter is an instrument that detects and counts physical particles present in the air. Aerosol particle counters are used to determine the air quality by counting and sizing the number of particles in the air. This information is useful in determining the amount of particles inside a building or in the ambient air. It is also useful in understanding the cleaning level in a controlled environment such as a cleanroom.

CliniMACS Plus: CliniMACS Plus instrument is an automated cell separation system based on MACS technology. It enables the operator to perform clinical scale magnetic enrichment of target cells or depletion of unwanted cells in a closed and sterile system.

Cellometer Auto2000: A digital cell counter and viability instrument.

Equipment located outside the GMP space:

Flow Cytometry: The ExCITE has a dedicated 8-color FACS Canto II Flow Cytometer that have automated loading racks to facilitate high through-put analyses of samples.

Additional ExCITE equipment include: 1 biologic safety cabinet, -20 and -80 C freezers, ELISA plate washer and reader.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Stem Cell Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

Facilities and Resources

Fields Relevant for the Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC)

 

The Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), brings a powerful research platform of generating patient specific stem cells and neural progenitor cells in support of Emory investigators. The ESCC’s focus and technical expertise is to derive and characterize human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from terminally differentiated somatic cells using non-integrating methods. IPSCs generated from patients with a genetic defect allows for a unique opportunity to study the mechanisms of disease in an in vitro model. Other applications for these cells include CRISPR gene editing the cell lines, developing a reporter line, drug screening and discovery, and potentially regenerative therapies. Additionally, the core will provide training and educational resources to support investigators with interest in human stem cells. The ESCC interfaces with other members of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities as a pipeline to analyze patient cells that will inform drug discovery and personalized medicine.

The ESCC uses human cells, whole blood and skin samples, as provided by investigators with IRB approval, as source material for the derivation of an induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS) line. The ESCC is able to isolate primary fibroblasts from skin tissue and acquire a variety subtypes of blood cells from whole blood. Patient LCLs and iPS-derived neural progenitor cells can also be generated by the core. Additionally, established human iPS, embryonic stem cell lines, LCLs, HEK293T cells and other various established cell lines are cultured in the lab.

The ESCC located in a laboratory located on the 4th floor of the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building, with approximately 200 square feet of dedicated cell culture and wet-lab space. The ESCC’s cell culture room includes two biosafety cabinets, four carbon-dioxide incubators, two EVOS microscopes, a Countess cell counter, a Neon transfection system and a PCR machine. The ESCC also houses its own LS6000 liquid nitrogen dewar with a CS100 controller for automatic level control for storage of cryopreserved cells during active projects. The ESCC has additional access to a Nikon Eclipse TI Fluorescence Microscope, a Nikon Biostation IM Microscope, a Keyence Fluorescence Microscope, an Applied Biosystems QuantiStudio 6 Flex Real Time PCR machine, a Biorad ChemiDoc MP Imaging system and a Synergy H1 Multi-mode Plate Reader.

Facilities and Resources

Fields Relevant for the Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC)

 ...

Emory Stem Cell Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT 

Major Equipment for ESCC Users

 

Emory Stem Cell Core (ESCC) is located in a laboratory located on the 4th floor of the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building, with approximately 200 square feet of dedicated cell culture and wet-lab space and 200 square feet of office space. The ESCC infrastructure includes:

Two ThermoFisher 1300 Series Class II biosafety hoods. The 4 feet safety cabinets provide superior protection for daily culturing of cells with SmartFlow design with digital airflow verification and adjust airflow as filter resistance changes. The installed UV light works as an effective germicide and viricide for daily use.

Four HERACELL VIOS 160I CO2 incubators. These CO2 incubators support a range of culturing needs for optimal cell growth. In-chamber fan gently distributes clean, humidified air throughout the chamber ensuring homogeneous conditions and fast recovery of all parameters in 10 minutes or less for stable culturing conditions. The In-chamber HEPA continuously filters the entire chamber air volume every 60 seconds and the steri-run sterilization feature ensures elimination of all biological contaminants.

Two EVOS XL Core microscopes. The EVOS®XL Core Imaging System is a digital, transmitted light, inverted imaging system for cell and tissue culture applications and routine cell maintenance. These compact systems are kept inside the biosafety cabinets and allow for routine imaging of cells without the worry of contamination from exposure to the environment outside the cabinet. The large LCD screens allow for multiple user viewing and are excellent for training and teaching.

Worthington LS6000 liquid nitrogen dewar with CS100 Automatic Controller. A liquid nitrogen refrigeration system that holds nearly 5000 2 ml cryovials for cryogenic storage of cells. The CS100 controller is a sophisticated automatic level controller that provides standard alarms and stores more than 500,000 events.

ThermoFisher Sovall ST16 centrifuge. A benchtop machine to perform cell culture and blood processing applications with a variety of rotors for 15 ml tubes, 50 ml tubes and microcentrifuge tubes.

Fisher ISOtemo waterbath. A water bath that allows for consistent temperatures and reliability for routine culturing purposes.

Applied Biosystems Countess II FL. A benchtop cell counter equipped with state-of-the-art optics, full autofocus, and image analysis software for rapid assessment of cells in suspension. It comes with three-channel flexibility (brightfield and two optional fluorescence channels) to count cells, monitor fluorescent protein expression, evaluate apoptosis, and measure cell viability.

Invitrogen Qubit Fluorometer. A fluorometer designed to accurately measure DNA, RNA, and protein quantity in less than 3 seconds per sample with high levels of accuracy using only 1-20 ul of sample.

Applied Biosystems SimpliAmp Thermal Cycler. A compact 96 well thermal cycler for essential PCR flow and a veriflex temperature control for 3 zones  with accurate optimization.

Invitrogen E-gel iBase and Safe Imager Electrophoresis system. A electrophoresis system allows for the separation of DNA in 7 minutes and the  transilluminator that allows real-time visualization of the migration of  the DNA in the e-gels. This system replaces the need for staining with ethidium bromide and visualization using UV making it a much safer and more effective way to visualize DNA.

Invitrogen Neon Transfection System. A transfection machine that enables fast and efficient delivery of nucleic acids into all mammalian cell types including primary and stem cells. Unlike standard cuvette-based electroporation chambers, the neon uses biologically compatible pipette tip chamber that generates a more uniform electric field in 10 or 100 ul reactions.

Additional Equipment Access to:

Nikon Eclipse TI Fluorescence Microscope. An inverted motorized microscope for fluorescence imaging of live or fixed cells on slides.

Nikon Biostation IM Microscope. A live cell imaging system that incorporates a microscope, an incubator and CCD camera to provide a stable environment for live cells imaging and simple long term time lapse data acquisition.

Keyence Fluorescence Microscope. A benchtop microscope that captures high-resolution publication quality images without the necessity of a dark room. It accommodates brightfield, fluorescence, and phase contrast observation with a single unit. It supports slides, cell-plates, dishes, and flasks for imaging different samples.

Applied Biosystems QuantiStudio 6 Flex Real Time PCR system. A real time PCR machine with a 96 well block for assays for gene expression, genetic variation, gene regulation, or protein expression experiments.

Biorad  ChemiDoc MP Imaging System. A full feature instrument for imaging and analyzing gels and western blots. It is designed for multiplex fluorescent western blotting, chemiluminescence detection, general gel documentation and stain-free imaging.

Synergy H1 Hybrid Multi-Mode Reader. Synergy™ H1 is a configurable multi-mode microplate reader, with monochromator-based optics for flexibility, filter-based optics for sensitivity, or both. BioTek’s patented Hybrid Technology™ offers applications versatility and excellent performance in a modular platform to expand as your laboratory’s needs change. Synergy H1 now offers continuously variable bandwidth monochromators for fluorescence excitation and emission wavelength selection; the fluorescence bandwidth can be set between 9 nm and 50 nm, in 1 nm increments, allowing users to fully optimize reader settings to drive the best assay performance compared to fixed bandwidth systems.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT 

Major Equipment for ESCC Users...

Integrated Cellular Imaging Core - FACILITIES AND RESOURCES
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICI) Users

 

INTEGRATED CELLULAR IMAGING CORE (ICI)

The Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICI), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is housed in four main locations within the central research and clinical area of Emory’s campus (Fig 1 a&b), the ICI hosts 19 microscopes and 4 workstations in approx. 1800 sq ft of scope room, wet space and bench space (Fig 1 c). Each location requires either keycard or physical key entry to ensure only ICI trained users have access to the equipment. Each location has available wet space for basic preparations, in addition to being located within close proximity to multiple lab spaces, allowing for easy access to researchers own preparation areas. We house 19 different microscopes ranging from basic widefield setups to the more advanced, cutting edge, and custom built. These include confocal, spinning disk, multiphoton, super-resolution (SIM and STED), and light sheet (including a 3i lattice light sheet and in house OpenSPIM), with 10 systems (including at least from each modality) equipped for live cell conditions.

Service: The ICI team assists researchers with fluorescence experiments from an extremely broad range of scientific areas, from physics and chemistry to basic biology and translational research. Services range from experimental education and consultations, assisting and advising on sample prep, to optimizing data acquisition and subsequent analyses. The ICI supports investigators from start to finish, from bench to publication, at any point that assistance is needed. While using the microscope is the central part of our process, we are keenly aware that pre- and post-acquisition are equally important and are strongly emphasized during consultations. We help mold scientific questions to the right microscope, data set and analysis, and ultimately to researchers’ answers.

Data Collection, Management, and Analysis: All microscope acquisition data is automatically synced each night to an Emory Library and Information Technology Services (LITS) server to ensure redundancy. Data analysis can then be performed on either user located machines or ICI workstation locations. We advise, assist, and train users with data access and quantitative analyses as required. In addition to standard analysis and 3D visualizations, we provide custom Fiji macros and plugins, Imaris XTensions, and video sequencing (see NoPhotonLeftBehind YouTube channel).

Education: ICI holds periodic educational seminars and journal clubs. To advance our educational mission beyond the walls, we have a range of bite-sized YouTube tutorials on simple data analyses for Fiji, CellProfiler and Imaris, viewed by over 150k views and approaching 600 subscribers.

ICI Technical Support Team:

Adam Marcus, PhD – ICI Scientific Director

Dr. Marcus is an Associate Professor in the Department of Hematology and Medical Oncology and Georgia Cancer Coalition Scholar. He also serves as the Associate Director for Basic Science and Shared Resources for the Winship Cancer Institute, Director of Graduate Studies for the Cancer Biology PhD program, and Scientific Director of the Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICI). His laboratory has been focused on the cell and molecular biology of lung cancer invasion for the last 14 years. In particular, investigating how cells invade into 3-D microenvironments using a combination of live cell imaging approaches, 3D models, and standard molecular biology. Dr. Marcus developed and applies an image-guided genomics technique termed spatiotemporal genomic and cellular analysis (SaGA), utilizing photoactivated cell-specific selection for probing the biology of phenotypically heterogenous cells within a larger cancer cell population. In addition, Dr. Marcus’ lab is focused on STEM based learning in Georgia schools. In this role, he co-directs a 5-year NIH-funded, K-12 STEM outreach program (citizensciencehd.com) to promote diversity in STEM. This establishes a unique Citizen Science based curriculum in Georgia schools and has a full evaluation and outcomes component.

Neil Anthony, PhD – ICI Core Director

Dr. Anthony is an Associate Scientist with the School of Medicine and reports directly to the Assistant Dean of Research and the oversight committee for the ICI. He has 14 years of experience with advanced fluorescence techniques, including a biophysics PhD focused on fluorescence fluctuation spectroscopy (FFS), time-correlated single photon counting (TCSPC), coupled with multiphoton microscopy. He has built hardware setups including optical tweezers, laser scanned two-photon microscopy, and selective plane illumination microscopy, in addition to programming hardware control and analysis interfaces. He has experience with multiple imaging specific software analysis packages (including Imaris, Volocity, CellProfiler, and Fiji) in addition to general programming and analysis software and languages (Matlab, IgorPro, Java, C, Python). During his time with the ICI core (starting as an imaging specialist in 2013) he has developed existing 2D and 3D media skills for educational, reporting, and advertising core elements (Photoshop, Illustrator, and Blender). In addition, he has spearheaded a YouTube channel specifically for training users in bitesized sections. This ‘flipped classroom’ approach allows users to digest concepts prior to trainings. This channel has successfully been applied to data analyses, with microscopy concepts and acquisition software control in progress. Dr. Anthony provides outreach to the local community in seminars on microscopy techniques and data acquisition/analysis, in addition to teaching introduction classes for cancer biology and neuroscience graduate students.

Laura Fox-Goharioon – ICI Director of Research Projects

Ms. Fox-Goharioon is the Associate Director of Research Projects and experienced microscopist with over 34 years of cell biology and imaging experience at Emory University at the Whitehead location. She has over 13 publications focused on cell biology and imaging and has taken courses in super-resolution imaging and advanced image analysis, including the Analytical and Quantitative Light Microscopy course in Woods Hole, MA. She joined ICI at its inception and directly oversees the day-to-day operations of six microscopes including live cell, confocal, super resolution and multiphoton imaging.

April Reedy, PhD – ICI Research Specialist

Dr. Reedy is an Assistant Scientist with the School of Medicine with 15 years of applied microscopy experience in genetics and molecular biology, developmental biology and model systems. In her PhD in genetics and molecular biology she made numerous discoveries into the pathophysiology of Duchenne’s Muscular Dystrophy (DMD) in C. elegans. She has advanced confocal experience applied to C. elegans and Drosophila, including electrophysiology-based calcium imaging and ratiometric ROS imaging. Dr. Reedy also has immunofluorescence, pathology-based immunohistochemistry, and immuno-EM and cryo-sectioning experience. In addition to her extensive applied microscopy experience, Dr. Reedy has become a huge resource to investigators regarding experimental design.

William Giang – ICI Research Specialist

Mr. Giang is an imaging scientist with extensive data analysis, Python programming, and IT skillsets who holds a B.S. in Physics. He has two astroparticle physics publications from his time with IceCube, a South Pole Neutrino Observatory, where he utilized high performance computing clusters. After moving to Atlanta, he transitioned into a bioimage analyst to develop reproducible workflows for an Emory Cell Biology lab. Since joining ICI in 2018, he’s used his intimate knowledge of photodetectors to optimize acquisition settings and plan imaging experiments, especially in the context of high-resolution live cell microscopy. He applies classical and machine/deep learning strategies for image processing and analysis. Currently, his main roles include operating the lattice light sheet microscope and image analysis while also helping with confocal and super-res microscopy.

Gaurav Joshi, PhD – ICI Research Specialist

Dr. Joshi is an Assistant Scientist with the School of Medicine with 15 years of applied microscopy experience in cell biology and immunology.  His graduate work was focused on studying the mechanism of silica toxicity to alveolar macrophages to understand the development of the lung disease silicosis. This work demonstrated the mechanism of phagolysosomal leakage, ROS generation and cell death in alveolar macrophages using various fluorescent probes. He has led various microscopy-based projects and mentored undergraduate students in advanced cell biology laboratory course. In his postdoctoral work at UConn and Harvard School of Public Health, he showed the conditions under which silica nanoparticles are not toxic, a finding important for using them for drug delivery, and regulation of apoptosis in the lungs during development. Dr. Joshi has used various imaging systems such as laser point scanning and spinning disk confocal, live cell imaging, and high content imaging systems for his research on cells and tissues derived from animals and patients leading to nine publications. In his current role at ICI, he operates, trains and helps users from various disciplines with SIM super-resolution microscopy, laser scanning confocal and two-photon microscopy to address questions pertaining to basic and translational biology as well as make meaning out of their data. He keeps up with the current literature and his interest in new and upcoming technologies has enabled him to help groups with spatial transcriptomics.

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES...

Integrated Cellular Imaging Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICI) Users

 

INTEGRATED CELLULAR IMAGING CORE (ICI)

The Integrated Cellular Imaging Core (ICI), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides state-of-the-art light microscopy and image analysis platforms. ICI offers confocal, spinning disk confocal and live cell imaging, multi-photon animal and tissue imaging, widefield with deconvolution, super resolution, light sheet and image analysis. To effectively implement these technologies, ICI provides consultations, expert training, and support for all our systems. We assist our users from bench to publication, starting with designing experiments tailored to the specific microscope, through training and data acquisition, to data analysis and interpretation.

Confocal Imaging:

Leica SP8 (Winship): The Leica SP8 confocal laser scanning unit, attached to the latest Leica inverted DMi8 body, comprises an infinitely flexible prism based spectral detector system and multiple excitation laser lines (405, 488, 514, 561 and 633nm) for a vast variety of experimental and labeling options. Four channel detection, via two PMTs and two extremely sensitive Leica HyD detectors (GaAsP based), together with 8 kHz resonant scanning provides high speed imaging. A transmitted light detector allows for simultaneous laser scanned DIC or phase imaging. A stage and objective warmer facilitates numerous live cell imaging approaches such as FRET, FRAP, and photoconversion. High speed automated tiling/stitching and multipoint location acquisitions are also possible in combination with the above.

Olympus FV1000 (HSRB): This FV1000 confocal laser scanning microscope is mounted on an inverted Olympus IX81 microscope with a motorized x-y-z stage. It has a three channel PMT detection system with grating based spectral detectors on channels 1 and 2 (allowing for spectral unmixing). In addition, a transmitted light detector provides laser scanned DIC for label free imaging. These coupled with 6 excitation laser lines (405, 458, 488, 515, 559, and 635nm) facilitate highly flexible imaging combinations.

Olympus FV1000 (Whitehead): This FV1000 laser scanning microscope is identical to the HSRB FV above, except it’s filter based detection on all channels and a different combination of excitation laser lines (405, 488, 515, 543, 635). Having near identical systems in two locations provides easy secondary options without additional trainings during maintenance and repairs.

Olympus FV1000 Upright (Whitehead): This FV1000 laser scanning microscope is mounted on an upright Olympus BX61 microscope, with the same 3 channel filter based setup as above. Slightly different laser lines (405, 488, 514, 543, and 635nm) provide different experimental options, again without additional training. A large area stage and water dipping objective lenses allow for larger and aqueous based sample mounting options.

Live cell confocal imaging:

Nikon A1R HD25 (Whitehead): This live cell confocal laser scanning microscope is optimized for imaging cellular dynamics at high speed and a large view of view (25mm). A hybrid dual scanning confocal system with both galvanometric and resonant scanners, together with a piezo z controller, can acquire 1024x1024 images at 15 fps, 512x512 images at 30 fps, or with a reduced size up to 720 fps. A stage top environmental chamber at 37° C and 5% CO2 required for live cell imaging, coupled with a Perfect Focus system, provides extremely stable long-term imaging without drift. Flexible laser scanning control for photokinetics experiments can be conducted in multiple user-defined regions of interest. Six laser lines (405, 440, 488, 514, 561, & 640nm) and four channel PMT (2x GaAsP, 2x Multi-Alkali) detectors, in addition to a transmitted light channel for laser scanned DIC provide flexible live cell experimental options. A DUVB-2 GaAsP spectral detector unit provides arbitrary 10 – 320 nm wide spectral windows between 400 and 720 nm for complete spectral flexibility. NIS Elements packaged with analysis options coupled to JOBS tailorable data-based control system.

Nikon Ti2-E – Crest X-Light Spinning Disc Confocal (Winship): A Nikon controlled Eclipse Ti2-E with a CrestOptics X-Light V2 L-FOV ultrafast spinning disk confocal provides a 18mm FOV utilizing a sensitive high speed sCMOS camera (~100fps or more for cropped ROI). A stage top environmental chamber at 37° C and 5% CO2 required for live cell imaging, coupled with a Perfect Focus system, provides extremely stable long-term imaging without drift. A fast z-piezo and motorized xy stage provides high speed automated multi-location and tiling/stitching acquisitions. Seven laser lines (408, 445, 473, 518, 545, 635, & 750nm), DIC, and phase acquisitions are available. NIS-Elements packaged with analysis options coupled to JOBS enable tailorable data-driven acquisitions.

Super-resolution imaging:

Nikon N-SIM (Whitehead): The Nikon Structured Illumination Microscope (SIM) doubles the resolution of widefield microscopy in all three dimensions (down to 120 nm x-y and 300 nm z resolution), and can image samples prepared with conventional techniques (same as confocal or widefield). A sensitive iXon EMCCD camera and three laser line system (488, 514, and 561nm) provides high speed multi-color acquisitions. A SIM-TIRF mode is also available. The system also includes a 37°C 5% CO2 and humidity-controlled stage insert, together with heated objectives for the option of live cell super resolution acquisitions.

Deltavision OMX BLAZE (HSRB): The DeltaVision OMX imaging platform is an advanced multi-mode, super-resolution microscope system. DeltaVision OMX provides 4 color super-resolution imaging using 3D structured illumination (3D-SIM) as well as ultra-fast widefield-deconvolution acquisition (3x sCMOS cameras for 300 fps imaging). The OMX Blaze also has Ring-TIRF capabilities to image biological processes at the cell surface-coverslip interface. The laser scanning optics of the TIRF beam path allow for fast switching of photoactivation and photokinetics in combination with live cell widefield-deconvolution, 3D-SIM imaging or TIRF. The system also includes 37°C 5% CO2 and humidity-controlled stage inserts, along with heated objectives for the option of live cell super resolution acquisitions.

3i Lattice Light Sheet (Winship): The Intelligent Imaging Innovations (3i) lattice light sheet microscope (LLSM) is state-of-the-art for rapid high-resolution live cell imaging with low phototoxicity stemming from efficient lightsheet excitation/collection. Compared to a spinning disk confocal, the LLSM features 100x less phototoxicity/photobleaching in dithered mode. The collection objective, a Nikon 25X/1.1NA, is matched with a tube lens for an overall 62.5X magnification with better axial resolution than achievable through confocal microscopes. A one-channel 40x40x40um region can typically be imaged in 1 second. For super-resolution in x and z, a SIM mode is available at the expense of temporal resolution, and super-resolution may also be achieved through Super Resolution Radial Fluctuations (SRRF). The system has four lasers (405, 488, 561, and 642nm) for sequential acquisition with a quad-band bandpass filter. Samples are loaded onto 5mm glass coverslips and immersed in a 3- or 12-mL media bath between the inclined objective lenses.

Abberior Facility Line easy3D STED & Picoquant TCSPC: Abberior Instruments FACILITY LINE easy3D STED microscope with 4 excitation lines (405nm, 485nm, 561nm, 640nm), two pulsed STED lasers (595nm, 775nm). Includes adaptive illumination package (DyMIN, RESCue, and MINFIELD) for highest resolution and live cell super-resolution imaging at ultra-low light levels. Adaptive optics (OA) compensates for aberrations to improve STED in standard samples, and allow STED deep within tissues etc. Variable spectral detection and avalanche photodiodes (APDs) provide ultra-sensitive flexible detection. Picoquant time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) provides additional time resolved techniques such as fluorescence lifetime imaging microscopy (FLIM) and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS). Includes steady focus during all STED modes to circumvent drift. Water, silicone, and oil lenses available to match sample refractive index for increased signal and resolution. Live cell chamber for time lapse images (utilizing adaptive illumination decreases photodamage and extends imaging speeds and durations).

Multiphoton:

Zeiss 710 NLO (Clinic B): This multiphoton allows for intravital (live animal) imaging with high magnification and resolution. This microscope is equipped with a Chameleon Vision S tunable multiphoton laser (680 nm to 1050 nm) that can penetrate farther into tissue than a traditional confocal laser. This system is mounted on an upright Zeiss Axioexaminer microscope, together with a flexible large area stage for imaging live mouse single cells, thick tissue sections, and cell lines. The confocal optics of the 710 house spectral detectors coupled with six lasers lines (405, 458, 488, 514, 543, and 633nm) for flexible acquisitions. Two non-descanned detectors (NDDs) provide ultrasensitive detection of multiphoton signals. Oil, air and water immersion objective lenses are available.

Leica SP8 (Whitehead): The Leica SP8 is an upright confocal and multiphoton microscope with a Coherent Chameleon Vision II laser tunable from 680 to 1080nm. Two highly sensitive non-descanned GaAsP based HyD detectors provide imaging of multiphoton processes. The confocal unit houses an infinitely flexible prism based spectral detector system and multiple excitation laser lines (458, 476, 488, 496, 514, 561, 594nm) for a vast variety of experimental and labeling options (coupled with LASX unmixing software for experiments with potentially 10 or more colors). Four channel detection, via two PMTs and two extremely sensitive Leica HyD detectors (GaAsP based), together with resonant scanning provides high speed imaging. A CCD camera allows– for brightfield and Dodt Gradient Contrast (DGC) for label free imaging and sample navigation. A stage and objective warmer facilitates numerous live cell imaging approaches such as FRET, FRAP, and photoconversion. A 12 kHz resonant scanner provides high speed scanning at up to 428 fps, and there is automated tiling and image stitching. Oil, air, and water immersion objective lenses are available.

Widefield fluorescence:

Zeiss Axioplan 2 (Winship): The motorized Zeiss Axioplan 2 is equipped for routine widefield epifluorescence and transmitted light applications (DIC, phase, and brightfield) using a range of high-end Zeiss Plan-Apo objectives. A Zeiss Axiocam color camera allows for histology imaging or fluorescence imaging via multiple filter sets.

Olympus IX71 (HSRB): The inverted IX71 can perform epifluorescence and transmitted light microscopy. It contains long working distance objectives that allow for visualization through plastic culture dishes or glass. A sensitive color QImaging CCD camera and multiple filter cube sets provides fluorescence imaging in monochrome mode, and histology images in color mode.

Olympus IX51 (Winship): The inverted IX51 can perform epifluorescence and transmitted light microscopy. It contains long working distance objectives that allow for visualization through plastic culture dishes or glass. An Infinity CCD monochrome camera allows for sensitive acquisitions from multiple filter set options.

BioTek Lionheart FX (Whitehead): The compact Lionheart FX widefield microscope provides flexible automated acquisitions in fluorescence, brightfield, and color imaging modes, together with multiple lenses and 37°C and 5% CO2 control allowing live cell multiple plate reading, to IHC, and widefield-deconvolution.

Keyence BX81 (Clinic B): The Keyence BTX is a bench top epifluorescence microscope with flexible stage adaptors allowing imaging of up to 3 slides and different types of multi-well plates in both fluorescence and color imaging modes. Multiple field of views can be acquired, with a flexibility to stitch these images.

Image Analysis:

Four image analysis workstations are available, ranging from Dell workstations to custom built towers designed to handle 500GB sized data sets. Users can analyze their data using a full suite of image analysis options. These include Bitplane Imaris, Volocity 6.2, Fiji Is Just ImageJ (FIJI), and CellProfiler. Deconvolution is available via Microvolution. Custom Fiji macros and java plugins can be tailored to individual needs and are available to download. Video analysis tutorials are also publicly available on YouTube via the channel NoPhotonLeftBehind. MATLAB/Python code can be designed for stand-alone usage or for direct interface within Imaris.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020...

Emory Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

 

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

 

 

Specific Fields Relevant for Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF) Users

 

 

MOUSE TRANSGENIC AND GENE TARGETING CORE (TMF)

The Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides state of the art equipment and expertise for making genetically engineered mouse models, moving alleles on or off campus, or cryopreserving existing strains of mice. The TMF is located on the ground floor of Emory Health Sciences Research Building and occupies laboratories EG41 and EG42. The EG42 space includes a fully equipped tissue culture suite dedicated to embryonic stem (ES) cell culture, and microinjection/embryo manipulation space, and surgical suite. The EG41 space includes molecular biology space, and cryopreserved embryo/sperm archival space. The TMF has 100 sq ft of dedicated office on the 1st floor of the Health Sciences Research Building, which provides for meeting customers, and TMF team meetings. Dedicated workspace for TMF staff is also located in HSRB animal facility.

The animal holding/breeding room is located in EG57 is part of the animal facility and is operated by the Division of Animal Resources (DAR) as detailed below. All the mice used by the core for the production of gene edited mice are housed in this facility. It is managed by the Emory University Division of Animal Resources (DAR) in strict compliance with the standards and policies of the Public Health Service. Mice are housed in ventilated auto-water caging system and are changed under laminar flow hoods. The DAR staff is responsible for daily care of the animals as well as health monitoring and surveillance. The DAR also maintains vigorous quarantine and sentinel programs.

The core facility is fully equipped to perform all experimental procedures associated with the production of gene edited mice. In addition, the core facility has research space and equipment to assist laboratories with auxiliary procedures for the production and analysis of transgenic and gene targeted mice. These include rederivation and cryopreservation services, and custom mouse needs.

FACILITIES & OTHER...

Emory Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: September 1, 2020

 

Major Equipment relevant for Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF) Users

 

MOUSE TRANSGENIC AND GENE TARGETING CORE (TMF)

The Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core (TMF), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides state of the art equipment and expertise for making genetically engineered mouse models, moving alleles on or off campus, or cryopreserving existing strains of mice. With laboratories and animal facilities located on the ground floor of the Health Sciences Research Building (HSRB), the TMF provides mouse-related services that are supported by the following infrastructure:

Microinjection/Gene Editing (EG42):

Microinjection Station #1:

·         Leica DMi8 Inverted microscope with Phase contrast and DIC optics

·         Narishige manual micromanipulators

·         Eppendorf microinjectors

·         Eppendorf FemtoJet 4i transjector

·         Prime Tech PMM4G Piezo Impact Drive

·         Brook Industries heating/cooling Thermal Stage System

Microinjection Station #2:

·         Leica DMi8 Inverted microscope with Phase contrast and DIC optics

·         Narishige manual micromanipulators

·         Eppendorf microinjectors

·         Eppendorf FemtoJet 4i transjector

·         Brook Industries heating/cooling Thermal Stage System

Microinjection Station #1                  Microinjection Station #2

 

Embryo collection, manipulation, and rederivation (EG42)

            Leica M80 Binocular Stereo Microscope with heating stage (x2)

                        Leica M60 Binocular Stereo Microscope

                        Panasonic CO2 Incubator (x2)

                        Sutter P-87 Micropipette puller

            

ES Cell Culture (EG42)

Nuaire Class II Biological Safety Cabinet

ThermoScientific centrifuge

Eppendorf Centrifuge

                        Panasonic CO2 Incubator

Leica DMi1 Inverted Microscope

BioRad Electroporation Unit

                       

Sperm/Embryo Cryopreservation (EG41)

                        FTS Systems Bio-Cool IV

                        Locator 4 Liquid Nitrogen Dewar

MVE Liquid Nitrogen Dewars (x7)

 

Molecular Biology (EG41)

                        Ohaus Explorer Analytical Balance

                        Beckman-Coulter Allegra 64R high-speed Centrifuge

                        ABI 9700 thermal cycler (x2)

                        Thermo Scientific NanoDrop Spectrophotometer     

                        Nuaire Class II Biological Safety Cabinet

                        Fisher Marathon 16KM Centrifuge

                        AnalytikJena VisionWorks gel imaging system

 

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: September 1, 2020

 ...

Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core- FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

                                                                                       FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

                                                                                           Updated: September 1, 2020

 

ROBERT P. APKARIAN INTEGRATED ELECTRON MICROSCOPY CORE (IEMC)

The Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core (IEMC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides services and training on conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM), single particle cryo-electron microscopy (SP-Cryo-EM), cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET), conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cryo-high resolution scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-HRSEM). The IEMC supports academic, clinical, and industry users at two sites on Emory’s campus. Its focus and technical expertise aim to generate structural data from biological and non-biological specimens to support research in basic, biomedical, and material sciences and engineering.

The facility has recently incorporated micro-electron diffraction (micro-ED), cryo correlated light and electron microscopy (cryo-CLEM), and cryo electron microscopy of vitrified sections (CEMOVIS). Additionally, the acquisition of a Gatan K2 direct electron detector complements the existing DE20 direct electron detector for our cryo-EM and cryo-ET applications. The IEMC is supported by a qualified, supportive staff who not only contribute to research with their expertise but also with their commitment to training investigators (students, technicians and postdocs) on the various EM workflows. Users can utilize IEMC services autonomously or request IEMC staff to either assist or carry out entire workflows for them.

The Biochemistry Connector Site (ground floor of Rollins Research Center) hosts a state of the art Talos Arctica (200 kV) microscope for high-throughput acquisition of high-resolution SP-Cryo-EM data, equipped with a Gatan K3 direct electron detector and a Gatan Image Filter (GIF). For TEM and cryo-TEM sample imaging and screening, users have access to the Talos L120C (120 kV) instrument. In addition, this site includes a wet-lab space for room temperature sample preparation and a dedicated cryo-EM sample preparation area with a Gatan CP3 and a Vitrobot Mark IV plunge freezers.

The Emerson Site (ground floor of Cherry Logan Emerson Hall) includes dedicated wet-lab space for TEM preparation and processing, and immunocytochemistry. It hosts a Hitachi HT7700 (120 kV) for TEM, a JEOL JEM1400 (120 kV) for TEM, tomography of sectioned materials, and cryo-TEM, and a JEOL JEM2200FS (200kV) equipped with direct electron detectors for SP-Cryo-EM, Cryo-ET, and micro-ED. The IEMC is also equipped with Topcon SEMs for imaging and elemental analysis, as well as cryo-HRSEM of frozen-hydrated samples. Users also have access to a Vitrobot Mark IV for cryo-EM samples, microtomes and cryo-ultramicrotomes for semithin and ultrathin microtomy, high pressure freezing and cryo-substitution equipment for CEMOVIS or sample embedding, and sputter coaters for ultrathin metal film coating for room temperature and cryo-preserved specimens.

Together with the Emory Integrated Computational Core (EICC) and Emory’s Library & Information Technology Services, the IEMC also supports High Performance Computing with our Glacier Computation Cluster. Our staff also offers support for image analysis and processing for grants and publications.

                                                                            &n...

Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core- MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core (IEMC) Users

 

ROBERT P. APKARIAN INTEGRATED ELECTRON MICROSCOPY CORE (IEMC)

The Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core (IEMC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides services and training on conventional transmission electron microscopy (TEM), cryo-transmission electron microscopy (Cryo-TEM), single particle cryo-electron microscopy (SP-Cryo-EM), cryo-electron tomography (Cryo-ET), conventional scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and cryo-high resolution scanning electron microscopy (Cryo-HRSEM). The IEMC supports academic, clinical, and industry users. Its focus and technical expertise aim to generate structural data from biological and non-biological specimens to support research in basic, biomedical, and material sciences and engineering.

Emerson Site:

Three Transmission Electron Microscopes: The Emerson site houses TEMs suitable for imaging biological and non-biological specimens prepared using a number of methods both at room temperature and under cryo-conditions.

JEOL JEM-2200FS, 200 kV with in-column Omega filter and phase plates (Zernike and hole-free): This field emission TEM is set up for the semi-automated data acquisition of both single particle cryo-TEM data and tilt series for cryo-electron tomography. It is equipped with two direct electron detection devices (Direct Electron DE20 and Gatan K2) for high resolution imaging and a Gatan US4000 CCD camera for screening.

JEOL JEM-1400 120 kV LaB6 TEM with a Gatan US1000 CCD camera: Capable of all modes of TEM, including tomography of sectioned materials, cryo-TEM and conventional TEM. Semi-automated data acquisition is available for testing cryo-TEM grids and a Minimum Dose System (MDS) allows for imaging of beam-sensitive samples. The beam blocker allows for electron diffraction experiments.

Hitachi HT-7700 120 kV TEM with Tungsten filament and AMT CCD camera: Capable of all modes of TEM, including tilt imaging and electron diffraction. A motorized goniometer allows +/- 70° sample tilting.

Holders for Cryo-EM image acquisition: Two Gatan 626 holders for untilted data collection and 2 Gatan 914 holders for acquisition of tilt series (tilted data).

Two Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEMs): Topcon DS-130F and Topcon DS-150F Field Emission SEM/STEM with BSE (back-scattered electron detection), capable of in-lens and below-lens conventional SEM, and in-lens cryo-HRSEM. The Topcon DS-130F is fitted with an Oxford Instruments, INCAx-sight x-ray detector to carry out Energy-Dispersive Spectroscopy (EDS) for elemental analysis. Capable of accelerating voltages from 0.5 kV - 30 kV, with Schottky field emission sources and Gatan CT-3500 cold stages.

Coating systems: For the application of metal films on support surfaces and samples.

Denton DV-602 Turbo Magnetron Sputter System with a chromium target: For metal film coating of specimens in preparation of SEM and cryo-SEM data acquisition.

Denton Benchtop Turbo Carbon/Gold Evaporator: For applying thin layers of carbon or gold on surfaces, SEM samples, or specimen support grids.

 

Four Ultramicrotomes: For producing semithin and ultrathin sections from embedded tissues or prepared materials at room temperature or under cryo conditions. Three ultramicrotomes for room temperature ultrathin and semithin sectioning of resin embedded samples (Leica UC6, Leica Ultracut S, and RMC Power-Tome PC). One cryo-ultramicrotome (Leica UC6i/FC6) for sectioning under cryo conditions.

BALTEC HPM 010 High Pressure Freezing Machine:  for preparing frozen specimens including thick samples and monolayer cell cultures.

Leica AFS Cryo-Substitution: Apparatus designed for dehydration and fixation of cryo preserved specimens followed by gradual temperature increase and resin embedding.

ThermoFisher Vitrobot Mark IV: For plunge freezing aqueous solutions and cell suspensions in liquid ethane or propane for cryo-TEM or cryo-ET data acquisition.

Quorum GloQube Plasma Cleaner: To prepare support films by glow discharging for conventional and cryo electron microscopy. This instrument hosts a separate chamber for special treatment of support films under various gas environments

Imaging Data Processing and Analysis: 3 iMac workstations with Microsoft, Adobe, ImageJ, and IMOD software packages. Other image processing software packages installed as needed.

Biochemistry Connector Site:

Two Transmission Electron Microscopes: The IEMC – Biochemistry Connector site houses TEMs suitable for imaging biological and non-biological specimens at room temperature and under cryo-conditions.

FEI Talos Arctica (200 kV) with Bio-Quantum/K3 direct electron detector and Autoloader system: This instrument is suitable for cryo-grid screening and automated high throughput collection of high-resolution single particle cryo-EM data.

FEI Talos L120C (120 kV) with LaB6 and 4k CETA detector: For negative stain and cryo-grid screening.

Holders for Cryo-EM Image Acquisition: One Gatan 626 cryo-transfer holder

ThermoFisher Vitrobot Mark IV and CP3 Plunger- Gentle blot (Model 930): For plunge freezing aqueous solutions and cell suspensions in liquid ethane or propane for cryo-TEM or cryo-ET data acquisition.

Denton Benchtop Turbo Carbon Evaporator: For Carbon coating of grids.

Plasma cleaning systems: To prepare support films by glow discharging for conventional and cryo electron microscopy. These systems include a Solarus Plasma Cleaning System (Model 950) for cleaning of grids and sample holders and a Pelco Easy glow for glow discharge.

Imaging Data Processing and Analysis: Glacier (Computation Cluster: 2 GPU nodes and 4 CPU nodes) with all image processing software, such as Relion, CisTEM, and EMAN2/Sphire.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT...

Rodent Behavioral Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for the Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC)

 

RODENT BEHAVIORAL CORE (RBC)

The Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides rodent behavioral analysis services. Dr. David Weinshenker is the Scientific Director and Dr. Jason Schroeder is the Core Director who runs the day to day operations and provides services for investigators. The core facility has approximately 1300 sq. ft. of space dedicated to this core within the larger Division of Animal Resources (DAR) facility in the Whitehead Biomedical Research Building. The core space includes three mouse and/or rat testing rooms, and isolated cubicles for particularly sensitive tests. At present, the following items and tests have been developed and validated by the Core and/or the Weinshenker lab:

Locomotor activity

1. Novelty-induced locomotor activity

2. Circadian rhythm

Arousal and attention

1. Behavioral sleep latency

2. Latent inhibition

Coordinated movement

1. Rotarod

2. Grid performance test

3. Automated gait analysis

4. Beam traversal

5. Pole test

6. Abnormal involuntary movements (AIMs) scoring

Learning and memory

1. Morris water maze

2. Radial arm maze

3. Y-maze

4. Social memory/discrimination test paradigm

5. Novel Object Recognition

6. Fear Conditioning

Anxiety/Stress

1. Elevated plus maze

2. Light/dark box

3. Open field

4. Social defeat

Depression

1. Forced swim test

2. Tail suspension test

3. Novelty-suppressed feeding

4. Chronic unpredictable stress

5. Sucrose consumption/preference

6. Social defeat

Seizure susceptibility

1. Flurothyl seizure chamber

2. Kanic acid seizures

3. Pentylenetetrazole seizures

4. Bicuculline seizures

5. Audiogenic seizures

6. Electrical kindling

7. Increasing current electroshock seizures

8. Pilocarpine seizures

Reward/Reinforcement

1. Drug-induced locomotor activity

2. Drug-induced stereotypy

3. Sensitization

4. Conditioned place preference

5. Oral self-administration

6. Operant drug self-administration and reinstatement

7. Operant drug discrimination

8. Operant cocaine vs. food choice

Aggression

1. Resident-intruder aggression

2. Social defeat

Sensorimotor Gating

1. Acoustic startle

2. Prepulse inhibition

General hardware/software

1. 24 rat operant self-administration chambers (Med Associates) (6 of these are equipped with laser systems for optogenetics – see next line below)

2. 6 OEM 150mW 473nm Laser systems for optogenetics

3. 4 shock generators

4. 24 SDI automated locomotor activity chambers

5. 2 SDI automated conditioned place preference chambers

6. Clever Systems automated MazeScan software

7. Video-EEG electrical seizure apparatus (two Grass S44 stimulators, two Grass SIU5 stimulus isolators, two Grass CCU1 constant current units, oscilloscope)

8. 6 rat cages equipped with running wheels

9. 8 rat cages equipped with removable wire mesh enclosure for social defeat paradigm
10. 6 video cameras

11. 1 IntelliCage system

12. 4 Coulbourn Fear Conditioning Chambers

13. 4 SDI SRI-LAB chambers

FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES...

Rodent Behavioral Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC) Users

 

RODENT BEHAVIORAL CORE (RBC)

The Rodent Behavioral Core (RBC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), provides rodent behavioral analysis services. Major equipment includes:

1. Clever Systems automated MazeScan software (2). This tracking software is used in combination with our multiple mazes and apparatuses. It allows for digital recording and unbiased scoring of behavior. One system is used for tracking mouse behavior and the second is used for tracking rat behavior.

2. Stand-alone rodent enclosures used in combination with the Clever Systems tracking system for animal testing. We have 2 water mazes (1 for mice and 1 for rats), 2 Elevated Plus Mazes (1 for mice and 1 for rats), 2 forced swim test enclosures (1 for mice and 1 for rats), 2 mouse social investigation enclosures, 2 mouse open fields, 1 rat open field, 1 mouse light/dark box, 1 mouse zero maze, 2 rat CPP chambers, 2 mouse Novel Object Recognition enclosures, and 1 mouse Y-maze.

3. Eight Coulbourn Fear Conditioning Chambers (4 for mice and 4 for rats). These systems are equipped with cameras and software for analyzing fear behavior as evidenced by contextual or cued freezing.

4. Six OEM 150mW 473nm Laser systems for optogenetics. These systems can be used in combination with six of our operant chambers or on their own for optogenetic stimulation.

5. Twelve rat operant self-administration chambers (Med Associates) Six of the operant chambers are compatible with laser systems for optogenetics. These chambers allow for investigating a variety of operant behavior including and not limited to food and drug taking and relapse, drug discrimination, as well as responding for optogenetic manipulations.

6. Six mouse operant self-administration chambers (Med Associates). These chambers allow for investigating a variety of operant behavior including and not limited to food and drug taking and relapse, and drug discrimination.

7. 32 SDI automated locomotor activity chambers. These systems measure ambulation and general circadian activity in mice and rats.

8. 4 SDI automated conditioned place preference chambers. These chambers assess conditioned place preference/aversion.

9. 6 rat cages equipped with running wheels.

10. Six video cameras for use in combination with our tracking software or on their own.

11. One IntelliCage system. Up to ten mice can be implanted with transponders to monitor their fluid intake behavior with minimal handling. Multiple measures of operant behavior and fluid intake can be analyzed using this system.

12. Four SDI SRI-LAB chambers. Each unit measures startle behavior as well as pre-pulse inhibition, an animal model of schizophrenia-like behavior.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT...

Emory High Performance Liquid Chromatography Bioanalytical Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: September 22, 2020

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Fields Relevant for HPLC Bioanalytical Core (HPLC) Users

 

HPLC BIOANALYTICAL CORE

The HPLC Bioanalytical Core (HPLC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is supported by the Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology and the Emory University School of Medicine. The HPLC Bioanalytical Core measures monoamines, purines, and amino acids using HPLC methods in biological matrices including tissue extract, cell lysate, plasma, serum, CSF, urine, microdialysate. In addition, we provide expertise to develop and validate HPLC method to measure some drugs, endogenous compounds, peptides, and proteins.

The HPLC is located at the Woodruff Memorial Building Room 6306 and occupies 400 sq.ft of space. The core is equipped with three HPLC systems, which include two ESA CoulArray detection systems and one Waters HPLC system. The Core also has access to additional equipment for sample preparation including a SpectraMax M5e spectrophotometer (Molecular Devices, Sunnyvale CA) which is a UV/Vis variable wavelength microtiter plate reader with Softmax Pro software used for performing colorimetric spectrophotometrical protein assays, and Branson sonifier 450 which is used for tissue homogenization. Also available are a Millipore Water system, centrifuges, sonicator, pH meters, balances, oven, refrigerators, hot plates, stirrers, -70C freezers, and other standard equipment.

FACILITIES AND RESOURCES

Updated: 1 September 2020...

Emory High Performance Liquid Chromatography Bioanalytical Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for HPLC Bioanalytical Core (HPLC) Users

 

HPLC BIOANALYTICAL CORE (HPLC)

The HPLC Bioanalytical Core (HPLC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is supported by the Department of Pharmacology and Chemical Biology and the Emory University School of Medicine. The HPLC is located at the Woodruff Memorial Building Room 6306 and occupies 400 sq.ft of space. The core is equipped with three HPLC systems, which include two ESA CoulArray systems and one Waters HPLC system.

Two ESA CoulArray Systems: Each of the ESA 5600A CoulArray systems is equipped with ESA model 584 pump, PEEK Pulse damper, ESA 542 refrigerated autosampler injector, temperature controller, model 5020 guard cell, and model 6210 coulometric array cell. The system is controlled and chromatograms are analyzed by a Dell personal computer using the ESA CoulArray V3.10 software.

Waters HPLC System: Waters HPLC system consists of model 717-plus autosampler, model 1525 binary pump, model 2996 photodiode array detector, fraction collector and 2465 electrochemical detector. The system is controlled and chromatograms are analyzed by Waters Empower 2.0 software.

Additional Equipment Access to:

SpectraMax M5e spectrophotometer: A UV/Vis variable wavelength microtiter plate reader with Softmax Pro software used for performing colorimetric spectrophotometrical protein assays.

Branson sonifier 450: A sonicator used for tissue homogenization.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

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Translational Neuroscience Core - FACILITIES & OTHER RESOURCES
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

Facilities & Other Resources

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE CORE (TNC)

The Translational Neuroscience Core (TNC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is supported by the Department of Neurosurgery and the Emory University School of Medicine. The TNC supports investigators interested in translation of new therapies at an accelerated pace, providing the necessary tools for clinical translation. In addition to specialized neurosurgical services, the TNC also provides investigators and customers with consulting services in the field, as well as preparation of Animal Protocols and Final Reports. The TNC performs its surgical activities at Emory’s Division of Animal Resources (DAR) or at Yerkes National Primate Research Center. The TNC surgeons also perform its surgical activities at Contract Research Organizations – CROs, at the discretion of its customers. Individual members of the Translational Neuroscience Core have personal workstations to support their core activities and share office / laboratory space on the 6th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building. The Translational Neuroscience Core is available for users in the Georgia Core Facilities Partnership (Emory, Yerkes, GA Tech, Morehouse, GSU, UGA, Mercer University, Morehouse School of Medicine, Clark Atlanta, Augusta University), as well as external users from industry.

Facilities & Other Resources

Updated: 1 September 2020

 ...

Translational Neuroscience Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: September 09, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Specific Fields Relevant for Translational Neuroscience Core (TNC) Users

 

TRANSLATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE CORE (TNC)

The Translational Neuroscience Core (TNC), one of the Emory Integrated Core Facilities (EICF), is supported by the Department of Neurosurgery and the Emory University School of Medicne. The TNC is located on the 6th floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building. The TNC laboratory area includes dedicated office space for administration and management of its resources. It also includes adjacent storage space for its equipment. For procedures performed at Emory University, Emory Division of Animal Resources - DAR - provides facilities, personnel and equipment for animal care.

TNC equipment includes:

OmniPlus/OSM200 Surgical Microscope: Microscope includes integrated 4K Streaming video and 19" Exor Vision LCD Monitor.

Midas Rex™ Legend Stylus® High-Speed Neurosurgical Drill

Sterrad NX Sterilization System: A next-generation low-temperature hydrogen peroxide gas plasma system that offers fast terminal sterilization with a standard 28-minute cycle time and an advanced 38-minute cycle time.  The system can sterilize a wide range of instruments, including single-channel flexible endoscopes, semi-rigid ureteroscopes, power drills, batteries, cameras, light cords, rigid scopes, general surgical instruments, and more. The system provides the flexibility of having dry, packaged, sterile instruments ready when needed.

State-of-the-art Neurosurgical Equipment and Instruments for Spinal Cord Procedures

·         4 complete sets of neurosurgical tools specific for performing laminectomies

·         4 complete sets of spinal platforms designed for spinal cord injections

·         3 microinjector pumps for therapeutics delivery

·         4 external spinal immobilization apparatus

·         Customized injection cannulas for therapeutics delivery

Specialized Neurosurgical Equipment for Brain Procedures

·         Stealth hardware equipment

·         Head frames

·         Manthis catheters and pumps

·         Customized injection cannulas

State-of-the-art Neurosurgical Instruments for Nerve Repair Procedures

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

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Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences - Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program (TARP) has been providing primarily cognitive behavioral therapy within clinical and clinical research contexts at Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences since 1990. TARP is located on the third floor of the EP12 building next to MAP. TARP operates out of a suite of 12 offices, plus additional rooms for psychophysiological assessment, file storage, and conference room. The program is fully equipped with modern desktop computers, printers, fax machines, photocopier, supplies, and video-taping equipment. The personnel have extensive clinical experience and all have been trained to conduct high-quality clinical research.

The Trauma and Anxiety Recovery Program (TARP) has been providing primarily cognitive behavioral therapy within clinical and clinical research contexts at Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences since 1990. TARP...

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences - Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program (MAP) is the largest clinical research program in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and will be the primary clinical site for this project. MAP has been conducting NIH- and industry-funded outpatient research trials of major depression, PTSD, social phobia, generalized anxiety disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder and panic disorder for 15 years. Trials conducted by MAP include industry- and federally sponsored studies, including the recently completed PReDICT study with a recruitment target of 400 treatment-naïve MDD patients willing to be randomized to medication or psychotherapy. MAP personnel conduct telephone screening of approximately 1200 people per year for depressive or anxiety disorders, resulting in in-person evaluations of approximately 150-200 people per year who are interested in participating in clinical research. Potential research subjects contact MAP either through our telephone number or complete application forms located on the website (www.emoryclinicaltrials.com).

 

MAP is located on the third floor of the Executive Park 12 (EP12) building. MAP operates out of a suite of 12 offices, plus additional rooms for physical exams, phlebotomy, EKG, centrifugation, storage (including dry- ice storage equipment, and -20ºC and -80ºC freezers), massage and a conference room. There are two sound attenuated, light controlled massage therapy rooms equipped with massage tables, white noise machines, and linens.

The program is fully equipped with modern desktop computers, printers, fax machines, photocopier, supplies, and video-taping equipment. The personnel have extensive clinical experience and all have been trained to conduct high-quality clinical research. There is plentiful free parking directly in front of the EP12 building, and a public transit bus stop directly in front of the EP12 building.

The Mood and Anxiety Disorders Program (MAP) is the largest clinical research program in the Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and will be the primary clinical site for this project. MAP has been conducting NI...

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences: The department is an innovative global leader in discovery, training, and clinical care of psychiatric patients.  The department has interdisciplinary programs that span the entirety of the human life cycle, from work with neonatal children to the care of geriatric patients.  The program provides comprehensive psychiatric services for all of Emory Healthcare Systems, Inc., as well as our affiliate hospitals: Grady Healthcare and the Atlanta VA Medical Center and is one of the top federally funded departments of psychiatry in the country, having extensive research expertise across a wide spectrum of psychiatric inquiry. The program is internationally known for research in prenatal exposures, stress neurobiology and the pathogenesis and treatment of mood and anxiety disorders. The department is able to provide a variety of different types of training experiences for undergraduate students, medical students, pre- and postdoctoral graduate students, psychiatric residents and fellows in a variety of psychiatry subspecialties. Facilities for drawing and processing of biological samples are located in Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences on the 3rd floor of the Brain Health Center. This lab has phlebotomy supplies, laboratory processing and storage, and other equipment for human studies. This site is supported by certified personnel and coordinators.

Emory Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

Department of Psychiatry & Behavioral Sciences - TMS Suite
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

TMS Suite: The TMS clinic is located on the ground floor of the Emory Brain Health Center. The suite consists of two spacious treatment rooms, designed for the simultaneous use of two TMS machines. Patients in both rooms can be observed from the Clinical Coordinators’ post. Televisions are installed in both rooms to keep the patient occupied during the 40 minutes of rTMS treatments as patients are required to remain awake throughout the treatment session. The suite is equipped with dedicated power supplies to meet the requirement of the TMS machines. The TMS clinic has installed the MagVenture TMS Device which is capable of doing both rTMS and theta burst treatments. The new Neuronavigation equipment will be installed shortly for greater precision with stimulation localization. The suite also uses the Cool-B65 A/P, butterfly (figure 8) coil with active cooling that can be used to administer rTMS treatment as well as operate as a sham/placebo coil. There is no difference in appearance between the active and placebo sides, thus allowing double blinding of research studies. There is also an adjustable output for current stimulation of the patient’s skin synchronously with the magnetic stimulation pulses.

TMS Suite: The TMS clinic is located on the ground floor of the Emory Brain Health Center. The suite consists of two spacious treatment rooms, designed for the simultaneous use...

Emory Healthcare Addiction Services
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Emory Healthcare Addiction Services is located at the Brain Health Center at the Executive Park site of Emory Healthcare. As a part of the Emory Healthcare Network, the Brain Health Center brings together more than 400 researchers and clinicians specializing in neurology, psychiatry and behavioral sciences, neurosurgery, rehabilitation medicine, and sleep medicine to more rapidly predict, prevent, treat, and cure devastating diseases and disorders of the brain. The building also holds more than 20 centers and programs including the Child and Adolescent Mood Program, Epilepsy Center, Pituitary Center, Stroke Center, Treatment Resistant Depression Program, and Veterans Program. The facility has fully equipped clinical laboratories and ancillary services, as well as a transcranial magnetic stimulation machine (model MagVenture MagPro X100 with sham coil). The facility is capable of running transcranial magnetic stimulation and urine drug screens on site. The Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences will provide administrative and computer support.

The Emory Healthcare Addiction Services is located at the Brain Health Center at the Executive Park site of Emory Healthcare. As a part of the Emory Healthcare Network, the Brain Health Center brings together more than 400 researchers a...

Emory Brain Health Center
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

Emory Brain Health Center: Unlike any other healthcare system in the country, Emory Healthcare combines neurology, psychiatry and behavioral sciences, neurosurgery, rehabilitation medicine, and sleep medicine to offer complete, coordinated care for disorders of the brain. Bringing these specialties together, allows more than 400 researchers and clinicians from different areas to work in collaboration to more rapidly predict, prevent, treat, or cure devastating diseases or disorders of the brain. These unique collaborations are demonstrated in some of the more than 20 centers and programs with in the Brain Health Center.

 

The Emory Brain Health Center building is 2 miles from the Emory Hospital, just off campus with highway access and free parking for patients. The facility houses the Departments of Neurology, Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, and Rehabilitation Medicine, and the Sleep Center. Most of the outpatient and clinical research programs for these departments are carried out here. The building has five floors (25,000 square feet each) and each floor houses multiple departments with integration of the faculty offices, clinic space and research facilities. An educational suite for all learners (i.e. residents, fellows, medical students, graduate students, etc.) where the residents from all departments train in didactics, and where there are meeting rooms for case conferences and journal clubs is located on the first floor. The first floor also houses an auditorium for departmental grand rounds, conferences, workshops and meetings, and a cafeteria for patients and staff. The building additionally includes an infusion center, physical/occupation/speech therapy space, and a clinical/research MRI scanner.  Directly adjacent to the primary location, the Emory Brain Health Center has an additional 27,200 sq ft of newly renovated clinical, office and laboratory space for the aging programs.

Emory Brain Health Center: Unlike any other healthcare system in the country, Emory Healthcare combines neurology,...

Department of Anesthesiology
Last Updated: January 28, 2020

The Emory Department of Anesthesiology, led by Andrew J. Patterson MD, PhD, includes more than 150 faculty members. In addition to providing comprehensive anesthesia care, they are involved in conducting basic, clinical, and transitional research in areas such as critical care, obstetric anesthesia, cardiac surgery, and pain medicine, generating $ 1.7 million in extramural research funding, which has been steadily increasing over the past 3 years. The Anesthesiology department has a dedicated Emory Research Hemostasis and Coagulation Core laboratory (ERHCCL) under the direction of Vice Chair for Research, Roman Sniecinski, MD, MSc, which is fully equipped to measure various coagulation proteins, thrombin generation and viscoelastic properties of clotting blood. The department also has a dedicated staff of research nurses and coordinators to help with conducting clinical trials in partnership with government agencies, industry, and other academic partners.

The Emory Department of Anesthesiology, led by Andrew J. Patterson MD, PhD, includes more than 150 faculty members. In addition to providing comprehensive anesthesia care, they are involved in conducting basic, clinical, and transitional research in areas such as critical...

NUCLEAR CARDIOLOGY FACILITIES
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

Nuclear cardiology facilities are located on Tunnel Level of Clinic A. They include two imaging suites dedicated to nuclear cardiology, including treadmill and patient preparation rooms. 

Imaging systems include:
1. GE Discovery 570c SPECT System (2010, upgraded to SPECT/CT in 2016). Ultra-fast solid state SPECT/CT.

2. Siemens Biograph 40 PET/CT (40 slice CT) with Rubidium 82 Generator for myocardial perfusion PET/CT.  Note that an exercise lab is also available for use with F-18 based myocardial perfusion tracers.

 

Nuclear cardiology facilities are located on Tunnel Level of Clinic A. They include two imaging suites dedicated to nuclear cardiology, including treadmill and patient preparation ...

NUCLEAR MEDICINE RESEARCH SPACE - WOODRUFF MEMORIAL BUILDING
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

Nuclear medicine research space is located on the first floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building, which is attached to Emory University Hospital.  There are 642 sq. ft. of laboratory research space which contains all necessary equipment standard for synthetic chemistry, radiolabeling and production of radiotracers. It includes two six-foot fume hoods, one three-foot fume hood, and one biological safety cabinet, two refrigerators and two freezers (-53C), two Buchi rotary evaporators, gravity convection oven, vacuum oven, microscope, melting point apparatus, four infusion pumps and Endosafe PTS system for bacterial endotoxin testing.  An additional 320 sq. ft. are available for animal research is devoted 100% to this project.  

Major equipment in our laboratory includes the Perkin Elmer 1480 WIZARD2 gamma counter designed for superior counting performance with all types of samples. It can accommodate both I-131 and Tc-99m (or F-18) simultaneously, two Beckman HPLC systems which are each dedicated to radiochemical separations and equipped with model 170 radiometric detectors, 166 UV/VIS detectors and a C-18 RP Beckman Ultrasphere ODS 5 mm column (4.6 mm x 250 mm); both use 32 Karat chromatography software.  Additional equipment items include a Waters HPLC system, which is only capable of non-radioactive chemical characterization and separation, and a dose calibrator (Capintec CRC-5). 

Two desktop computers (Dell and Lenovo) and two HP laser printers for lab use.

 

Nuclear medicine research space is located on the first floor of the Woodruff Memorial Research Building, which is attached to Emory University Hospital.

IMAGING POLICY ANALYSTICS FOR CLINICAL TRANSFORMATION (IMPACT) RESEARCH CENTER, EUH
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

 

Founded in 2019 and supported with a 5-year $1.9 million grant from the American College of Radiology’s Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, the IMPACT Research Center is the only imaging-focused health policy research group embedded within an academic radiology department. Dr. Richard Duszak (an interventional radiologist and nationally recognized health policy thought leader) and Dr. Michal Horný (a health economist and nationally recognized imaging-focused health services researcher) lead a team of faculty, trainees, and analysts.  

The IMPACT Research Center has partnered with other health services researchers at Emory University to obtain access to multi-year IBM Watson MarketScan files. These datasets include longitudinal healthcare claims for over 20 million Americans covered by employer sponsored health insurance. In addition, the IMPACT Research Center has recently obtained multi-year Nationwide Inpatient Sample (NIS) and multi-year Nationwide Emergency Department Sample (NEDS) files from the Healthcare Cost and Utilization Project made possible through a Federal-State-Industry partnership sponsored by the Agency for Healthcare Research and Quality (AHRQ). These files represent the largest available weighted sample datasets for inpatient and emergency department encounters across the United States. Additionally, the IMPACT Research Center has recently obtained access to the National Trauma Data Bank (NTDB) which is the largest aggregation of United States trauma registry data ever assembled. All of these datasets are housed on secure Emory University servers in a manner that permits access to the entire research team.

As one of the primary cores of the multi-core Harvey L. Neiman Health Policy Institute, the IMPACT Research Center investigators partner with collaborator cores at the Neiman Institute’s national office and Health Economics and Analytics Laboratory (HEAL) at the nearby Georgia Institute of Technology. The Neiman Institute has over 20 years of aggregated Medicare claims data and nearly 15 years of encounter-level Medicare claims data for a 5% sample of all Medicare beneficiaries. HEAL recently obtained access to Optum Real-World Data (claims data from United Healthcare for over 50 million covered United States lives).

 

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NUCLEAR MEDICINE AND MOLECULAR IMAGING FACILITIES, MIDTOWN
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging is located on the ground floor of Emory University Hospital Midtown and houses advanced imaging equipment for SPECT and SPECT/CT. A second facility on the 8th Floor of the Medical Office Tower houses PET/CT imaging. The nuclear medicine area includes radiopharmacy, a patient preparation room, and three scan rooms. The PET/CT suite includes two patient preparation rooms.

Image processing workstations include:

3 dual-detector SPECT cameras equipped with Low Energy High Resolution, Medium Energy and High Energy collimation:

1. GE Infinia (~2006, also has pinhole collimation for high-resolution planar imaging)

2. GE/SMV DST (prior to 2014, planar only – no SPECT is performed on this unit)

3. GE Discovery NM/CT 670c SPECT/CT (2011, 16 slice CT).

 

 1 PET/CT System

 

1. GE Discovery 600 PET/CT (~2009, 16 slice CT) with respiratory gating capability.

 

Image processing workstations include:

1. GE Xeleris Workstations (2 systems)

2. 3 MIM Software Workstations with advanced processing capabilities for oncologic and neurologic imaging.

 

Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging is located on the ground floor of Emory University Hospital Midtown and houses advanced imaging equipment for SPECT and SPECT/CT. A second fa...

MEDICAL IMAGE PERCEPTION AND PSYCHOPHYSICS LABORATORY
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

 

           i.      Key to the psychophysics lab is a Series 6000SU Eye-Tracker (Applied Science Laboratories, Bedford, MA) with a magnetic head-tracking device. This system is an advanced eye-tracker that accurately and unobtrusively measures point of gaze and gaze duration information. The 6000SU is ideal for use in a clinical radiology setting because it provides for an unlimited field of view with free head and body motion. The 6000SU is capable of measuring point of gaze with a precision of less than one-half a degree and accuracy of less than one degree. The system comes with an extensive software library to collect and analyze data.

 

          ii.      There is also a Tobii eye-tracker available for research studies. This system has the eye-tracking tools integrated into a dedicated monitor and can be used for studies where scan patterns are of more interest than precise accuracy.

 

         iii.      A number of software packages are available for use in the psychophysics applications. The main statistical software that Dr. Krupinski uses for analyzing general data is StatView (SAS Institute). It is used for general descriptive statistics as well as comparative tests (ANOVA, Chi-Squared etc.). In addition Dr. Krupinski has the software to run a variety of Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analyses including: CLABROC, CORROC2, INDROC, LABMRMC, LABROC1, LROC, MRMC, PLOTROC, ROCFIT, ROCKIT, RSCORE and ROCPWRPC. Dr. Krupinski maintains the website for the Medical Image Perception Society (http://www.radiology.arizona.edu/krupinski/mips/rocprog.html) that provides links to all of the programs from the various sites that developed them. As new programs become available they are added to the site.

 

         iv.      We also have customized software for image display and analysis developed by Dr. William Dallas from the University of Arizona (IMPROCRad). This software takes any type of image (e.g., DICOM, .tif, .img) and displays it on any monitor. There are various navigation functions available (e.g., next image, zoom, pan) as well as image analysis functions (e.g., image statistics such as noise calculations for a given region of interest).

 

          v.      A variety of high-performance medical-grade display monitors are available in the lab, including a Barco Coronis Uniti (MDMC-12133) 12 Megapixel.

 

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RADIOPHARMACEUTICAL DISCOVERY LAB
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

 

In addition to the radiochemistry and cyclotron facilities, Dr. Goodman's research group occupies 1500 square feet consisting of one four-man laboratory and two two-man laboratories in the Emory Center for Systems Imaging in the Wesley Woods Health Center Building. The laboratories are fully equipped with standard facilities that include three Waters analytical HPLC units that are configured with UV/Vis, Bioscan Radiometric and Advion mass spec detectors, one GE Tracerlab FXN 2 unit, one CEM Discovery SP, one CEM PETwave, four Mettler electronic balances, seven rotary evaporators, one UV/Visible spectrophotometer, A Packard Cobra auto-gamma counter, one LabConco laminar flow hood for cell culture operations., two cell incubators for cell growth functions, one inverted microscope for cell counting, one portable cryogenic container for cell storage, 3 refrigerators, one freezer, three centrifuges, glassware, etc.

 

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Atlanta VA Core Equipment: Microscopy and Imaging
Last Updated: January 31, 2020
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Atlanta VA Core Equipment: Basic and Cell Biological Tools
Last Updated: January 31, 2020
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Atlanta VA Core Equipment: Rodent Physiology Tools
Last Updated: January 31, 2020
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AWS at Emory Cloud Computing and Storage
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

This research proposes to utilize AWS at Emory, which is an Emory customized implementation of the Amazon Web Services computing infrastructure. AWS at Emory  provides investigators with access to many of the key research computing services offered by AWS and provides additional security and technical controls to help ensure the data are protected from unauthorized use. Within this environment, investigators and their team are able to take advantage of the scalability and elasticity of the cloud while leveraging best practices in cloud computing.

Some highlights of the service include:

  • When using AWS at Emory from on campus, the traffic flows through the Emory core network to the AWS environment. Throughout the Emory network, the network devices are redundant to ensure a high standard of availability. In addition, wherever appropriate, the network traffic will flow over the Internet2 pathways to take advantage of the high speed, restricted academic network.
  • As part of the account creation process, the service provisions a set of virtual private cloud environments that provide geographic redundancy for the data and services. Through this automated process, the environments are set to an approved configuration with minimal risk of variations. With all steps automated, there is a greater level of assurance around firewall rules, network configurations, and environment set ups.
  • All AWS services enabled in AWS at Emory have been assessed by the Emory Information Security team for potential risks. Where applicable, the teams have built out monitoring and remediation controls to check to ensure the accounts do not implement configurations that may have unintended consequences or move them to a state of non-compliance. For example, all storage must be encrypted. If the storage is configured to be not encrypted, the monitor will notify the account owner and dismount the storage.

In addition to these Emory-specific customizations, the Emory research team benefits from: (a) Amazon’s elasticity, providing investigators with the opportunity to scale up or scale down their infrastructure based on needs. As such, the team is not paying for unused or idle infrastructure; (b) ability to tap into Amazon’s technology optimized for specific research workloads, such as high memory computing cores and high speed solid state drives (SSD); and (c) quickly spin up computing resources within minutes to increase the time for investigators and their team to conduct their science.

In support of this service, Emory has dedicated technical resources to help researchers and their teams. Emory has purchased AWS Enterprise support to provide 24x7 support for the service, and is also sponsoring training and leading a cloud community of practice, which includes participation from investigators, IT organizations, and scientific cores. 

To help investigators utilize AWS, Emory IT offers free consultation on designs and cost estimations. More information can be found at: aws.emory.edu

This research proposes to utilize AWS at Emory, whi...

Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS)
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

Emory’s Libraries and Information Technology Services (LITS) LIMS team supports the Emory Research Laboratory Information Management System (LIMS) application. LIMS is a secure, internally hosted application designed to support workflow automation and information tracking related to biospecimen sample management and processing as part of Emory’s Bio-Banking infrastructure. 

Key features and benefits of the system include: 

  • Study management including the Study Design Module (SDM), which provides an easy to use graphical user interface for study design including visits, time points and draws.
  • Participant/subject management
  • Sample management throughout the entire sample lifecycle
  • Location management – used to track sample boxes and freezer locations
  • Instrument integration
  • Reagent tracking
  • Tests and Results
  • Electronic shipments
  • Reports and label creation
  • Provides API integration with other bio-banking applications such as Emory Research Subject Registry (ERSR), Clinical Research Assistant (CR-Assist), Research Electronic Data Capture (RedCap).
  • Easy sharing/collaboration between PI studies and samples if desired.
  • HIPPA compliant
  • Servers are hosted in climate controlled, physically secure server operations center with 24 x 7 monitoring and environmental sensors and controls.
  • Network segmentation and firewalls to restrict access to the database
  • Complex passwords required for system access
  • Nightly backups - All backups are encrypted and with a rotating cycle of media stored off-site in case of a disaster
  • All servers are patched on a regular basis and have anti-virus software scanning

More information available at: https://it.emory.edu/catalog/data-and-reporting/lims.html

Emory’s Libraries...

Research Electronic Data Capture (REDCap)
Last Updated: February 04, 2020

REDCap is a secure, internally hosted web-based application designed specifically to support data capture for research studies. REDCap is an open source software program supported through a consortium led by Vanderbilt University. REDCap is a metadata driven electronic data capture system available for investigators to use for form-based data collection. The system is supported by Emory Libraries and Information Technology Services (LITS) and hosted on a LITS virtual machine (VM) environment with nightly backup and full redundancy for high application availability and reliability. REDCap is a web-based system with the Apache/PHP web server located in the DMZ and the MySQL database backend hosted in a HIPAA compliant secure data zone. Access to the system requires an Emory University or Emory Healthcare user account with external users supported using Emory University sponsored accounts.

Key features and benefits of REDCap include: 

  • An intuitive interface for data entry (with data validation)
  • Audit trails for tracking data manipulation and export procedures
  • Automated export procedures for seamless data downloads to common statistical packages (SPSS, SAS, Stata, R)
  • Procedures for importing data from external sources
  • Facilitates compliancy with Emory’s HIPAA policies and procedures
  • Advanced features, such as branching logic and calculated fields

More information available at: https://it.emory.edu/catalog/data-and-reporting/redcap.html

Division of Cardiology Common Equipment
Last Updated: February 11, 2020
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Center for AIDS Research (CFAR)
Last Updated: February 11, 2020
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Division of Cardiology Facilities & Other Resources
Last Updated: February 11, 2020
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Health Services Research Center
Last Updated: February 17, 2020
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Division of Pulmonary Biobank
Last Updated: February 19, 2020
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Division of Cardiology Biobank
Last Updated: February 19, 2020
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Division of Digestive Diseases Equipment
Last Updated: February 19, 2020
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Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta: Clinical Research Staff
Last Updated: May 12, 2020

The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Clinical Research Staff Support Model was developed more than 15 years ago to provide the research operational needs for Principal Investigators conducting research within Children’s. The core of highly qualified and trained clinical research coordinators, nurses, assistants, and interns are managed by 5 Clinical Research Managers located on each campus: Egleston, Scottish Rite/Hughes Spalding, Center for Advanced Pediatrics, Marcus Autism Center, and within our AFLAC Cancer Center’s CRO. These managers oversee a team of more than 100 clinical research professionals who partner with more than 150 Principal Investigators across our many subspecialties. While several have set study teams, there is also opportunity for Investigators to utilize the experienced pool of research coordinators on an as-needed basis. To facilitate acute access to research staff, Children’s implemented an expedited position approval process for extramurally funded positions in 2019. Research projects can be serviced immediately by clinical research campus managers while permanent staff is hired and onboarded, if needed. Research staff are specifically trained by the Children’s Clinical Research Department’s dedicated Research Educator in collaboration with their campus Manager to conduct all research activities according to federal regulations, institutional policies and procedures, and ICH/GCP guidelines. Study specific training is completed by sponsor resources or the Principal Investigator and documented accordingly in the study’s education log.

Clinical Research Support Training and Development: Children’s Clinical Research Department provides consistent, cross-campus onboarding, training, and on-going development to all our clinical research staff.  Research relevant training and career development activities include but not limited to:

  • For Emory-IRB approved studies:  Mandatory, two-day, in-person course--“Introduction to Clinical Research at Emory for Coordinators and Nurses”.
  • Mandatory Children’s computer-based training--“Children’s Research Process Training” completed at hire and annually.
  • Completion of Children’s Research Department’s Orientation Checklist within 90 days of hire with Manager confirmation signature.
  • CITI Program human subject’s protection training every 3 years, including GCP.
  • Mandatory in-person Children’s Research Administration Orientation within first month of hire.  Presenters include representatives from the IRB, Research Compliance, and Research Finance.
  • Individualized coordinator/nurse training with the Research Educator on items such as informed consent training and review of internal audit findings identified by Children’s Compliance Department during routine reviews.
  • Children’s Research Mentorship Program with annual mentor/mentee pairings.
  • Quarterly clinical research department staff meetings where new policies, procedures, or regulation changes are reviewed.
  • Monthly research educational seminars offered on campus, such as:  Pediatric Research “K-Cub” Meeting Series, Research Resources 101, Pediatric Education Research Lunch Series, Emory Department of Pediatrics’ Grand Rounds and Pediatric Research Seminars.
  • Study-specific research conferences, SoCRA and/or ACRP Research Conferences, and the Southeastern Pediatric Research Conference held annually.

Clinical Research Support Resources: The clinical research support team has access to all Children’s subject matter experts in the following areas: IRB, Research Compliance, Research Education, OSP, ORA, Research Leadership, and any Children’s Clinical ancillary or professional partners for queries and on-going training needs.  All Children’s and Emory Institutional policies and procedures are readily accessible via Children’s and Emory intranets.  Additionally, helpful tools such as study start-up, close-out, and project transfer checklists, forms and templates for regulatory documents, and past research training sessions and webinars are also posted for easy access.

 

 

The Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta Clinical Research Staff Support Model

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta: Clinical Research Staff Development
Last Updated: May 12, 2020

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta employs a full time Research Educator who works specifically with the clinical research staff. The educator collaborates with our institutional partners at Emory University and others to plan, develop, train and implement research priorities across the enterprise.  

All research staff working on Emory IRB approved projects are required to complete a two day, in-person course- “Introduction to Clinical Research at Emory for Coordinators and Nurses”. This course is designed to provide a basic framework of the roles and responsibilities for clinical research staff to equip them with the tools to assist them in successfully performing in their job. The course introduces the new and existing clinical research staff to the federal regulations governing the conduct of clinical research including relevant institutional policies and procedures. The course also provides an integrated and practical overview of the operational procedures to facilitate compliance in clinical research. 

Employees are also required to complete the online training titled “Children’s Research Process Training” at hire and annually. This course is divided into three segments; Study Start-up, Study Conduct, and Study Closeout, and is designed to educate the research coordinator or nurse about the entire life cycle of a research project at Children’s. 

In addition, Children’s hosts quarterly staff meetings. These meetings cover a wide array of topics and are frequently used to introduce significant changes to policies/procedures, roll out new system initiatives, introduce changes to processes or federal and regulatory rules.

New Children’s employees are required to attend an in-person Research Administration Orientation (RAO) within the first month of employment. During the RAO, representatives from the IRB, Research Compliance, and Research Finance discuss their specific areas and how they will interface with the coordinator or nurse. Research specific SOP’s are also reviewed during the RAO. Children’s policies, SOP’s and guidelines are housed on our internal website, Careforce Connection, and can be accessed by all Children’s staff or those with sponsored accounts from other institutions.

Individualized coordinator/nurse training with the Research Educator is available as well. Mock consent training is the most commonly used service provided by the educator; however, other ad hoc training is also available. The educator partners with the research compliance team to address items identified by their audit program and ensure proper adherence to federal regulations, institutional policies and procedures, and ICH/GCP guidelines. Children’s research managers also complete an orientation checklist with each employee to verify mastery of key concepts related to their role as a research coordinator or nurse.

We believe that continuing education beyond what is offered here at Children’s is important and provide funds for four staff members per year to attend national conferences via a scholarship program. Our primary focus is on the conferences hosted by the two main research professional associations (Association of Clinical Research Professionals and The Society of Clinical Research Associates), but other conference attendance is supported as well.  

The Pediatric Education Research Lunch Series (PEARLS) is a monthly panel discussion that covers a variety of research topics from federal regulations to specific operational issues. The PEARLS session topics are chosen and organized by a committee of research staff volunteers and the panels are manned by subject matter experts in the particular field of discussion. The sessions are teleconferenced to reach a broader audience.

Lastly, Children’s requires human subjects’ protection training every three years via the CITI program. The CITI GCP module is required every three years for federally funded studies but is recommended as best practice regardless of the funding source.  

Children’s Healthcare of Atlanta employs a full time Research Educator who works specifically with the clinical research staff. The educator collaborates with our institutional partners at Emory ...

Biostatistics Collaboration Core - MAJOR EQUIPMENT
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 

Major Equipment for Biostatistics and Collaboration Core (BCC) Users

 

BIOSTATISTICS AND COLLABORATION CORE (BCC)

RSPH High Performance Computing Services (HPC):

RSPH HPC Cluster Systems: RSPH is host to a Beowulf-style HPC cluster. In total, this cluster has 664 cores (providing over 1,300 threads) with over 4TB of aggregated system memory. Users of the cluster access Emory Isilon high-speed storage partitions over direct-connected fiber links. The cluster runs on 64-bit Red Hat Enterprise Linux and utilizes the Grid Engine distributed resource manager for allocating runtime and memory consumption on the system. Licensed software such as SAS and MATLAB are installed for general use on the cluster, as well as a large number of open-source software packages and programming environments, including R, Python, Fortran, and C/C++. Environment autonomy for specific and reproducible execution on nodes is supported through Anaconda. Shared code interaction is supported through Jupiter Notebook.

RSPH Server Services:

Virtual Server Services: RSPH server platforms are provided by both standalone systems and virtual servers through a VMware system. The RSPH VM platforms provide over 100 virtual servers that are used for administrative, teaching, database, and research needs. RSPH IT deploys both Windows and UNIX environments. Cloud server services are growing as part of the infrastructure as well, spanning SAAS, PAAS, and IAAS systems hybridized back to the campus and local systems. These servers are divided to be open or highly secure to comply with HIPAA and FISMA Moderate-defined controls. Some specific physical server platforms are deployed for performance and compatibility requirements for some application systems.  An example is our database platform.

Internet/Web Services: RSPH uses a central IT services resource, Microsoft Office365, for our email and is a secured, sensitive data system. RSPH uses the Cascade content management system to update and generate content for our main school website.  All Rollins web content is served up through local RSPH web servers, which also support center, program, administrative, and personal faculty research websites.  RSPH IT offers a number of application environments to support administrative and research endeavors such as Cold Fusion development and support for JAVA-based applications. RSPH has an intranet system that focuses on providing online information and access to the various services at RSPH. This is done through a dedicated platform using the product Noodle.

Data Storage: Data storage is provided across a number of layers and services that use local network accessed systems, central IT network storage systems, and cloud-based storage. We provide over a petabyte of central IT storage for research needs and back-up services. Additional on-demand storage for research or server systems support can be acquired through central IT. All storage services are HIPAA secure. Collaborative storage areas for file sharing are provided through products like Box and OneDrive. These storage areas are HIPAA secure and can be set up for external collaborations.

Database Services: RSPH IT provides primary secure database services utilizing Microsoft SQL Server. These databases are used for application systems across our administrative and research needs. Database accounts are available to faculty members upon request.

Network Environments:

RSPH Network: The RSPH network is connected to the Emory Campus backbone via a 10 Gigabit Ethernet connection, making campus services and wide area network services readily available.  RSPH also has an extensive wireless network providing “N” class connections and speeds that cover all of the school’s buildings and nearby external areas.  This network offers guest services as well as secure services for students, faculty and staff.  All of the secured services inside the school’s firewalls—including network storage and other services—can be access through the Emory VPN using two-factor authentication. Integrated printing, faxing, and scanning services are provided throughout RSPH buildings and are integrated with our network storage systems.

Applications, Informatics, and Application Development Systems:

Over 40 applications, statistical platforms (SAS, R, STATA, SPSS), and various programming and research analytics (quantitative and qualitative) applications are provided to integrate full lifecycle research informatics needs.  Examples of these are survey instruments such as Redcap and Qualtrics and various form-based data entry systems. Laboratory informatics support is available through a Thermo Laboratory Information Management system and specimen tracking system, Open Specimen. Integration with external mail and CRM systems such as Mailchimp and Salesforce are provided. Cloud-based services for potential student interaction are provided through systems such as Slate.  HIPAA secured data visualization and dimensional manipulation platforms include Tableau, PowerBI, and Business Objects. GIS application platforms such as ARCGIS are supplied on an enterprise license. Application development platforms provided include: Rstudio, Cold Fusion, database management tools, and others. Many of these general application systems are centrally funded through RSPH IT and supported. Specific applications that a researcher may need are supported and installed upon request. The Central IT Research IT group provides a number of tools such as the data warehouse I2B2 which lets you query Emory Healthcare electronic health record data for patient counts and aggregate information.

End-Node Computing:

Desktop Computing: RSPH provides a set of standard laptop and desktop systems to choose from for our faculty and staff. Recommendations for standard computing configurations for student computing success is provided. The higher-end analytic systems have at least a I7 CPU configuration with a minimum of 16GB of RAM memory, 21 inches or higher flat panel monitors standard with 500 gigs local disk space, and 64 bit Windows. RSPH’s Apple environments are generally iMac configurations or MacBook laptops with at least 16 gigs of memory. In many cases, multiple monitors are deployed well. A number of our researchers have expanded the computational desktop resources for their systems to drive high performance computation with extensive memory, specialty CPU/GPUs, and extended local storage.

Many RSPH staff and faculty have multiple systems that include docking laptops and other mobile devices such as tablets. All of our desktop and laptop systems are connected to our network storage that provides both highly secure and access controlled, sharable folders. RSPH provides support for all types of mobile devices such as tablets and smartphones. These mobile devices are often used in RSPH research as field data collection devices.

Virtual Desktop Computing: Our virtual computing environments for students, staff, and faculty are provided through our RSPH Citrix environment. This virtual desktop environment provides more than 40 applications and is accessible from any place one can get on a network and open a browser. The Citrix environment is also set up to be a highly secure environment where data does not leave the Emory systems. These virtual desktops are integrated into all the other services such as the shared storage systems. The current platform is designed to extend the on-premise capacity through virtual desktop provisions on cloud services such as AWS.

Student Kiosk Computing: Students have access to 62 additional computers in an open lab area so they can get to their email, the RSPHCitrix system, Microsoft Office products, and other campus computing resources. These computers and the lab computers are all connected to a student printing system that they can use for printing their documents. The printers are business hubs providing scanning, copying, and printing and are located across various floors and in both buildings and through the wireless network.

Information Security:

RSPH’s IT environment is a HIPAA-covered entity and complies with HIPAA and Emory information security and privacy policies and practices. In compliance with these policies and practices, RSPH aligns with the National Institute of Standards and Technology special publications (800 series) for identifying, assessing, and managing information security risk within a technology environment. Drawing on federal and industry best practices, RSPH has implemented a series of multi-layered security controls to protect the integrity, reliability, and confidentiality of data. All systems that access our infrastructure are scanned for vulnerabilities and any identified vulnerabilities are assessed and managed. Security policies are created and reviewed through the Woodruff Health Sciences Center HIPAA committee, the Emory University Technology Infrastructure and Policy committee, and local policies through the Rollins Information Technology Advisory committee.

MAJOR EQUIPMENT

Updated: 1 September 2020

 ...

Emory Integrated Core Facilities - Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment
Last Updated: October 14, 2020

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the the Biostatistics Collaboration Core is available at the BCC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Center for System Imaging Core is available at the CSI Website 

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Glycomics and Molecular Interactions Core at the EGMIC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Flow Cytometry Core is available at the FCC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Gnotobiotic Animal Core is available at the EGAC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the the Emory Integrated Computation Core is available at the EICC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Integrated Genomics Core is available at the EIGC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Integrated Metabolomics and Lipidomics Core is available at the EIMLC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Integrated Proteomics Core is available at the EIPC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Mutliplexed Immunoassay Core is available at the EMIC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Cellular and Immunotherapy Core is available at the ExCITE Website 

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Emory Stem Cell Core is available at the ESCC Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Integrated Cellular Core is available at the ICI Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Investigational Drug Core is available at the IDS Website

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Mouse Transgenic and Gene Targeting Core is available at the TMF Core

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Robert P. Apkarian Integrated Electron Microscopy Core is available at the IEMC Core

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the Rodent Behavior Core is available at the RBC Core

 

The latest Facilities and Resources and Major Equipment information for the the Biostatistic...

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